Our webpages must be accessible so we have our documents in printable/downloadable PDF version first, then we have the document in a webpage version. You may need to scroll through the page to find the document you are looking for.

Documents on this page:

  1. President and Vice President Handbook
  2. Treasurer's Record Book
  3. Secretary's Book
  4. Reporter's Book
  5. Parliamentary Practices

Flathead 4-H Clubs are officated by our youth members. The club offices are held by our 4-H youth members. On this page are resources for our youth member club Club Officers.

Montana 4-H President and Vice President's Handbook

Printable version of Montana 4-H President and Vice President's Handbook (PDF)

Montana 4-HPresident andVice President’s Handbook

4-H 5244Revised September 2012

County _______________________________________________

Name of Club _________________________________________

Name of Club President _________________________________

Name of Club Vice-President ________ ____________________

Year _________________________________________________

Montana 4-H is a part of Montana State University Extension which is a part of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and your local county government. 4-H members are youth who chose to participate in Extension sponsored educational programs which are open to all youth.

The goal of Montana 4-H is to develop life skills, and educate youth and adults for living in a global and changing world by using the resources of the Land-Grant Universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Montana 4-H Educational programs include 4-H Clubs, after-school programs, 4-H camps, school enrichment, community service, and other events and activities for young people and adults as they work towards attaining life skills such as:

  • Fostering positive self-concept
  • Learning decision-making skills and taking responsibility for choices
  • Developing an inquiring mind
  • Relating to self and others
  • Acquiring a concern for communities – bothlocal and global

The emblem of the 4-H program is a green four-leaf clover with a white H in each leaf. The four H ’s stand for Head, Heart, Hands, and Health and represent development of life skills.

HEAD: Learning to think, making decisions, understanding ‘why’, gaining new and valuable insights and acquiring knowledge.

HEART: Being concerned with the welfare of others, determining values and attitudes by which to live, and learning how to work with others.

HANDS: Learning new skills, improving skills already developed, instilling pride in work, and earning respect for work accomplished.

HEALTH: Practicing healthful living, protecting the well-being of self and others, and making constructive use of leisure time.

This four-fold development is vital to every individual. Each of the H’s should be an important part of the goals youth identify as they participate in 4-H sponsored programs and educational activities.

Material adapted by:

Lea Ann LarsonMontana State University

Adapted from materials shared by:

Ohio State Extension

Texas Cooperative Extension

Kansas State University

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

Designed by:Montana State University Extension

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Montana State University and the Montana State University Extension prohibit discrimination in all of their programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital and family status. Issued in furtherance of cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics, acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Jill Martz, Director of Extension, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717

Table of Contents

Montana 4-H is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

Learning to Lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Duties and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Club Goals and Program Planning . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Running a Meeting and Parliamentary Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

APPENDIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Learning to Lead

You have been elected President or Vice President of your 4-H club. This is both an honor and a responsibility. As you fulfill your duties you will be representing 4-H in your club, county and community. Youth and adults will look to you for leadership and to set an example for others to follow. Your fellow members expect you to accept the responsibility of leadership, but the cooperation of club members depends on your leadership skills.

To lead means a variety of things to different people. When you state the 4-H Pledge at the beginning of each meeting, you pledge to help your environment by doing your personal best. Your club chose you to be the President, and you accepted an important role in helping your fellow club members fulfill their pledge. You are also using your head, heart, hands and health to lead the next generation of 4-H’ers “to make the best better.”

It is the President’s responsibility to maintain order at meetings and other club activities and to insure that all members are given a chance to be an active member of the club. It is the Vice President’s job to chair the education/activities committee and to make 4-H an enjoyable experience as members participate and learn.

This book is designed to assist you with your role as President or Vice President of your club. It outlines duties and responsibilities and is a resource for setting club goals, program planning, and running a meeting.

At the end of the year be sure to fill out the “Reflection on Leadership” report found at the end of this book. It will help you evaluate your year as an officer and help you become a better leader.

4-H CLUB OFFICERS

Club officers are an important part of the leadership team in the local 4-H club. Being an officer helps members develop leadership skills as they perform their required duties. Electing officers serves the following purposes:

  • Members learn about and participate in elections
  • Those elected learn leadership responsibility to their organization, and parliamentary procedures
  • Members feel ownership in club activities

Club officers are elected annually near the beginning of the 4-H program year. A leader should explain the duties of each officer to potential candidates and provide leadership to the election process so candidates are elected for their ability to do the job rather than for their popularity. To ensure better success, the organizational leader, an assistant leader or parent-volunteer should help each officer carry out his/her responsibilities.

One goal of 4-H is to develop leadership skills through opportunities to lead others. The existing officer team can help develop future leaders among all members by involving them in meaningful committee work. It is also a good idea to pass jobs around so members gain different experiences and perspectives; this means the same member doesn’t hold the same office in successive years or serve on the same committee over an extended period of time. A variety of experiences help members develop new skills and appreciation for the leadership roles that others play.

Following is a basic list of club officers, but clubs may elect additional officers. For example, some clubs elect a Historian who is responsible for the scrapbook. In other clubs, the offices of Secretary and Treasurer may be combined while some clubs elect several members to work on recreation as a committee. The club’s size and the age of members will determine the number and roles of elected offices.

Officers Usually Elected

The President prepares an agenda with the assistance of the other officers and volunteer leader(s). He/she presides at all business meetings, coordinates club business, appoints committees and establishes a sense of teamwork and unity for the club.

The Vice President coordinates committees and is responsible for educational programs at club meetings. He/she would also fulfill the President’s responsibilities in his/her absence.

The Secretary keeps written minutes of all meetings and records the attendance and participation in the 4-H Club Secretary’s Handbook. The Secretary also writes correspondence and assists with the club scrapbook, monthly reports and activity reports. He/she annually submits the Secretary’s Handbook to the county Extension office. Officers should check with local county Extension offices for deadlines.

The Treasurer handles club finances. He/she keeps an accurate record of the club funds, writes receipts and checks, and makes deposits. The Treasurer also prepares and submits the annual Year-end Financial Summary Report and other required documents to the county Extension office.

The Reporter/Historian writes and submits interesting and accurate reports about club meetings and club activities to the local newspaper and county Extension office and maintains the club scrapbook. Other responsibilities may include managing a club website and assisting with end-of-year reports.

The Recreational Leader promotes enthusiasm and inclusivity or belonging through games and songs at 4-H club meetings and other activities.

Remember all club members can have a leadership role through the use of functioning committees. Committees should get everyone involved in some meaningful way.

Duties and Responsibilities

3 DUTIES OF PRESIDENT

  • Meet with organizational leader to plan the agenda for the club business meeting.
  • Conduct the 4-H meeting while maintaining order and control.
  • Resolve disagreements.
  • Guide the meeting in a tactful and courteous way. The President is the guide or pilot for the meeting. Avoid giving opinions during the meeting.
  • Work with other club officers as a team to plan and follow through with programs and events.
  • Appoint committees as needed by the club and define the responsibility of the committees.
  • Delegate and make sure that everyone gets to serve on a committee or have responsibility in the club at some time during the year.
  • Check frequently with officers and committees to make sure they are doing their jobs and periodically ask them to give a report.
  • Cast the deciding vote in case of a tie.
  • Be prompt and enthusiastic and attend as many 4-H meetings and activities as possible.
  • Let the leader know well in advance if you cannot attend a meeting so the Vice President will have time to prepare to take over the role of President and preside over the meeting.
  • At the beginning of the year, the President should record his/her personal goals in “Reflections on Leadership” found on page 19 of the Appendix.

DUTIES OF VICE PRESIDENT

  • In charge of the club’s educational program.
  • Serve as Chair of the Program/Education Committee.
  • Assure that all members and advisors receive a complete club program, outline or booklet.
  • Work with all standing and special committees.
  • Assure that the club has a well-rounded program, including social activities, community service, demonstrations, project work, recreation, and education.
  • Check with those putting on a program to see if they are ready or need any help.
  • Work with the club at the beginning of the year to set club goals.
  • Assure that a program or presenter is properly introduced and thanked.
  • Assume the duties of the President in his/her absence.
  • Serve as President if the President resigns, quits the club, or is removed from office.
  • At the beginning of the year, the Vice President should record his/her personal goals in “Reflections on Leadership” found on page 20 of the Appendix.
  • Progress always involves risk; you can’t steal second base with your foot on first.
  • - Frederick Wilcox

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT

PLAN

  • Plan the business meeting with the leader(s) and other officers before the meeting.
  • Keep in close touch with local leaders, and the county Extension office. Be sure to read the newsletter each month for announcements and news that applies to the group.
  • Help plan the yearly program and record in the Montana 4-H Secretary’s Handbook (4-H 5327).

PRESIDE

  • The President presides at regular meetings. The Vice President takes the President’s place in the event that he/she resigns or is not present at the meeting. For this reason, it is important that the Vice President know all the duties of the President.
  • The President should use a pre-arranged agenda. It’s helpful to provide a copy of the agenda for each officer before the meeting so that everyone can effectively do his or her part in the meeting.
  • The Vice President serves as the chairperson of the program committee and may serve as chairperson on several committees. He/she may also serve as Secretary or Treasurer in his/her absence.

PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE

  • Parliamentary procedure is essential to conducting an orderly meeting. The parliamentarian, if your club has one, should help the President use correct procedures during meetings.
  • The Vice President usually votes on club matters. The President does not vote unless there is a tie.

DELEGATE

  • The President delegates responsibilities fairly so every member has a club responsibility at some time. The Vice President helps the President accomplish this.
  • The President and Vice President are involved with the planning of programs for the meeting. Examples include scheduling demonstrations and other special presentations.
  • The Vice President notifies and reminds people of their involvement in the next meeting.

BE OBSERVANT

  • Officers should make substantial efforts to know each member of the club.
  • Officers should make new members feel welcome and invite them to be on committees and voice their opinions.
  • Officers serve as a role model to younger members and their actions should reflect the high standards of the 4-H program.
  • Officers must be courteous to guests and properly introduce them to the club.
  • Attitudes should always be positive, so others become enthusiastic about the program as well.

WORKING WITH COMMITTEES

  • According to Webster’s Dictionary, a committee is “a group of people chosen to consider, investigate, and report or act on some matter or cause.” With this definition in mind, the Vice President works with all standing and special committees. The President confers with the Vice President on committee work, but it is the Vice President’s responsibility to keep track of what each committee is planning and to make sure there is no duplication of programs or overlap of dates and times. The Vice President also monitors discussions to assure that plans being made support the club goals for the year and are not in conflict with the approved club program.

Accept the challenges, so that you may feel the exhilaration of victory.

  • - -General George Patton

Committee Membership

Committees are appointed by the President or named from volunteers. Committee chairs may be named by the President or by the committee. The Vice President coordinates the work of all committees, and should not serve as the chairman of every committee. The number of members needed on a committee depends on the tasks assigned. Too few members and the workload may be too great – too many members make it difficult to get anything accomplished.

INTRODUCING A PROGRAM OR PRESENTER

One of the duties of the Vice President is to introduce programs and presenters. Introductions should include the program or presenter’s name, background about the program or presenter, and the title or subject matter of the presentation. Members giving demonstrations should also be introduced before their presentation.

Sample Introductions: “Lynn Oakland is our club’s guest speaker this evening. He is President of the county Audubon Society. Tonight he will speak to us about purple martins. Please join me in welcoming Mr. Oakland to our club.” (Start applause – it fills the time while the speaker comes forward.)

“Anna Green is a second-year 4-H member. She is enrolled in the breeding rabbit project. Her demonstration will teach us how to properly show a rabbit.”

Thanking a Presenter

  • Thank-you speeches should be 30 seconds to one minute in length. Listen to the speech for worthwhile qualities and express thanks for one or two of the following: the speaker’s thought, preparation, useful information, special news to the group, or time taken for a long journey to your meeting.

Sample thank you: “We would like to thank Mr. Oakland for the interesting program about purple martins. It has been especially intriguing to learn about the community these birds develop. We are glad that you could take the time out of your busy schedule to come to our meeting.”

The Vice President should shake hands with the presenter as part of the thank-you.

It is also a good practice to follow up a verbal thank-you with a written one. The club Secretary (or corresponding Secretary) should be given the contact information and instructed to send a thank-you.

TIPS FOR IMPROVING LEADERSHIP

As the President or Vice President of your club, it is your responsibility to lead the club and set an example for other members to follow. Remember that the other members are a big part of the club and they want to feel like they belong. To accomplish this, members need to be a part of planning the club activities, setting goals, and making club rules. As a leader, involving each member of the club in decision-making and activities is very important.

All members and their parents want to know what is expected from them and what their responsibilities are so they are comfortable in the club. Members also want to see that club goals are being accomplished. As a leader in your club, your year will be more successful if you gain your club’s trust. To do that:

  • Accept others for who they are
  • Only speak for yourself
  • Avoid put-downs at all times
  • Be responsible with all your tasks
  • Expect unfinished business and deal with it positively
  • Don’t judge anyone for what he or she may or may not do

If you wish to know what a man is, place him in authority.

  • - Yugoslav proverb

Avoid behaviors that block club development such as not listening, being discouraging or showing impatience with members and leaders. Not setting goals and/or a meeting agenda can block club success. Using words that some group members may not understand or by using offensive or sarcastic humor will create hostile environments where youth do not thrive or want to participate.

Research has shown that youth see a meeting as successful or unsuccessful according to how often they speak during the meeting. To encourage youth interactions have members sit in a circle.

If your club is large, try breaking into small groups of three to five at some time during the meeting to share ideas and allow everyone a chance to talk.

If your club has one person talking all the time, give the group a ball or some other object. Allow only the person with the ball or object permission to speak. Make sure the ball gets passed around to all members who want it.

It is a good idea for some kind of group-building activity to occur at the beginning of each meeting to make members feel comfortable.

  • - Walker, K., Phillips, M., McAdoo, S., et al (1999). LEADS Curriculum Notebook. Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.

NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS

At the end of your term as President you will oversee the nominations and elections for the next year. Nominations can come from the floor at a meeting. Ask members to suggest someone for an office during the election meeting. The member says, “I nominate (name) for (office).” A nomination does not need a second, although a second can be made to show support.

The President can appoint a nominating committee. The committee chooses candidates for each office and asks them to run for office. The committee then presents its nominations as a report at the meeting. Other nominations can be made from the floor by the members. When there are no more nominations, a member says, “I move to close the nominations.” If the motion is carried, the members vote on the candidates.

Voting for officers is usually by ballot, this allows members to vote for themselves or others and not be influenced by peers. It takes a majority (one vote over half) to be elected.

Nominations and elections are important club business. Tell the members about the election ahead of time so they can think about the kinds of officers they want to have. Also, make sure everyone knows the duties of each office.

  • Good luck in your new role as President!

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of this life,

that no man can sincerely try to help another first without first helping himself.

  • - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Setting CLub Goals and Program Planning

Clubs need to set group goals similar to the way individual members set project goals. Working as a group toward a goal can teach cooperation and service to others. How many goals a club has is up to the club. Consider your club program last year and identify areas that could be improved. Also think about new things your club might want to try. Goals should be specific, measurable and have a time frame. Goals should also encourage participation while meeting the needs and interests of club members. The club calendar/program starts with the club setting goals and planning activities.

  • The information below outlines some processes for setting club goals and finding activities for club meetings. For more information on developing a club’s yearly plan see the Secretary’s Handbook (4-H 5327).

CLUB GOALS

One idea is to pick a goal that goes with each of the H’s in the clover.

HEAD - A general goal the whole club can accomplish. For example, all members participate in an activity such as the county demonstration day.

HEART - Accepting the responsibilities and showing concern for the welfare of others. Plan a service project that the whole club does together such as visiting a nursing home.

HANDS - Learning new skills. Plan an educational program that teaches the 4-H club members something new.

  • HEALTH - Practicing healthy living. Host a year end

Club Goals

Accomplished

A general goal where the whole club can participate (Head)

Sample goal: 100 percent of members will give a demonstration to the club by March when the county contest is held and 80 percent will participate in the county contest.

A project that gets the club members involved in the community (Heart)

Learn a new skill (Hands)

Practice healthy living (Health)

PLANNING ACTIVITIES FOR MEETINGS

  1. Surveying Member Interests

Try a few of these methods to help your club generate ideas:

Brainstorming: Give members a topic, such as community service. Allow members to offer ideas and suggestions. Record ideas generated on a board or large piece of paper. Do not allow comments or evaluate ideas at this stage. After brainstorming, discuss the ideas and decide which the club wants to pursue.

Survey: Ask members to answer written, open-ended survey questions. Questions can be placed on posters around the room for members to add their suggestions or on paper for them to work on individually or in small groups. Examples of survey statements include: “We could help our community by . . .” and “Just for fun we could . . .”

Roll Call: Ask members to answer roll call with an idea or suggestion for a club activity, such as something new to try this year, or ideas for a family activity. Encourage creative ideas by asking each member to suggest a new idea.

  1. Selecting the Program/Education Committee
  • The Program/Education Committee should consist of three to ten people, representing club members, leaders and parents. Youth members should include different ages, genders, officers and interests. Adult members should include leaders and parents. If your club is small, the program planning committee might be the entire group. If the club is large, the President can appoint representatives or ask for volunteers.
  1. Planning the Program

Yearly club programs should include:

Balance of Activities: Community service, education, social/recreation, business and member recognition.

Who, What, Where and When: Include the person responsible, what is planned, and the location, date, and time.

Member Assignments: Who is hosting, doing demonstrations, providing refreshments, program responsibilities, etc.

County-wide Activities: These may be camp dates, judging dates, quality assurance training dates, fair dates, etc.

Contact Information: Leaders, officers, other members, county Extension Office.

  1. Approving the Plan

The Program/Education Committee presents the proposed program to the club for approval. After their presentation, the committee should be willing to make changes based on membership input. Seek club adoption and then develop a club calendar or program booklet to share with families.

Informed 4-H members and families will participate more, miss fewer meetings, meet deadlines, take part in programs, and be happier and more productive. Members with a club program or calendar will be more likely to have a positive 4-H experience.

  1. Evaluating the Plan
  • Evaluation gives members the chance to look at the strengths and weaknesses of the plan. After some discus­sion you can determine what went well and what could be done differently. Keep tabs on progress throughout the year by asking for suggestions and comments about your club’s programs. Good communication is essential to improving the programs your club offers in the future.

We should be patient with everyone, but above all, with ourselves.

  • - Saint Francis de Sales
  • Running a Meeting and Parliamentary Procedure

RUNNING AN EFFECTIVE 4-H MEETING

It is the responsibility of the President to preside over the meeting, protect the rights of all members, and keep the meeting on track. Here are some tips:

  • Arrive 15 to 20 minutes early to organize the room and meet with the hosts and leaders. Arrange chairs and/or tables in a circle or rectangle so members are facing each other. Whenever possible, avoid back rows.
  • Start the meeting on time and proceed in a businesslike manner. Tap the gavel twice to begin the meeting, whether or not everyone is present. If the President is late, the Vice President should start the meeting. Remember, when a meeting drags on or is conducted without order, members lose interest in the organization and forget the importance of attending meetings.
  • Prepare a written agenda prior to the meeting and have a copy for each member or post it where all can see.
  • Display the American and the 4-H flags properly.
  • Vary the response to roll call rather than having members say “here.” Encourage the use of roll call questions. This gives the members a chance to talk about themselves and lets other members get to know them. Include leaders on the roll call list.
  • Know and follow the simple rules of Parliamentary Procedure to keep the meeting running smoothly. (See Parliamentary Practice for 4-H, 4-H 5303, for a member-friendly overview of Parliamentary Procedures.)
  • Do not allow a discussion to drag on too long. If it does, call for the vote.
  • Do not discuss controversial issues while you are in the chair. If you wish to take part in the discussion of a motion, ask the Vice President or another member

to take the chair. Take your place in the group and participate in the discussion like any other member.

  • Encourage as many members as possible to participate. Don’t be afraid to call on quieter members in a non-threatening way.
  • While presiding over a meeting, the President should stand to:

- Open the meeting;

- Take action on a motion and announce the vote;

- Address the meeting participants; and

- Introduce a speaker.

  • Communicate upcoming events, dates, and responsibilities.
  • Set behavior standards early in the year and remind members of standards when necessary.
  • Set goals with the club and work diligently to reach them.
  • Vary traditional activities or try something new. Ask other members for ideas to make the meetings and programs more fun.
  • End on time. If your meeting has a specific ending time, make sure you adjourn the business meeting in time for the program and recreation/refreshment components.
  • Straighten up the room after your meeting. The meeting room should be as neat and clean as it was when your club arrived. Check with the host after the meeting to make sure the room is put back in order.
  • Encourage family participation in club activities, educational trips, fundraisers, etc.
  • Be courteous and attentive to leaders and appreciative of their help.
  • Seek advice from adults but make sure members, not adults, are running the club.

Remember, the President sets the example and will be watched by other members

  • who will follow that

COMPONENTS OF A 4-H MEETING

OPENING AND BUSINESS MEETING 15 to 20 mins.

The opening of a meeting sets the tone of the meeting. This is the time to get members focused on business and to get to know each other. The President calls the meeting to order with two taps of the gavel. Have the Secretary ask a question for roll call. It gives members a chance to talk and tell something about themselves.

In the business meeting members share ideas and plan activities. They also learn how to use basic principles of parliamentary procedure, make decisions as a group, and insure a smooth and effective meeting.

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 30 to 40 mins.

  • The second part of the meeting is the educational program. It may be a speaker, video, field trip, clinic, tour, member demonstrations, or project work session. This is an important component of the meeting and should take up about 50 percent of the time. Well-organized educational programs make learning fun and can really help the members of the club bond as a group. This portion of the meeting is the responsibility of the Vice President and committees.

RECREATION AND REFRESHMENTS 15 to 20 mins.

Recreation and social time provides members the opportunity to talk, get to know other members, catch up on personal happenings, and have fun. It is usually held at the end of the meeting. However, a recreational activity can be useful at the beginning of the meeting as an icebreaker. If it is an icebreaker there needs to be an end point that is strictly followed so that the business meeting starts on time. The recreation officer leads this program.

  • Traditionally, refreshments are served at the end of the meeting, giving more time for visiting and for members and parents to get to know each other. Once again, the group should be flexible. If a group is meeting right after school, you may want to start with a snack; although some clubs may decide not to provide snacks. Refreshments should be a shared responsibility of all club members, as it is a good way to get more people involved in the running of the club. Consider healthy snacks like fruits and vegetables as alternatives to traditional cookies and punch.
  • A 4-H MEETING HAS 3 MAIN PARTS:

Opening & Business

15 to 20 minutes

Project Activity

30 to 40 minutes

Recreation & Refreshments

  • 15 to 20 minutes

BASIC PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE

Parliamentary procedure is a systematic and democratic way to develop policies and carry out action in a group. Parliamentary procedure has four main objectives: to discuss only one item at a time, show courtesy to everyone, abide by the rule of the majority, and respect the rights of the minority.

A Main Motion is used to get group approval for an action item.

  1. A member wanting the club to make a decision raises his/her hand.
  2. The chair calls on the member.
  3. The member presents the motion by saying, “I move . . .” (NOTE: It is improper to present a motion by saying, “I make a motion . . .” or “I motion . . .”)
  4. Another member seconds the motion (a second is required to assure that more than one person is interested in the motion).
  5. The chair restates the motion and calls for discussion (discussion allows members to express their opinions and helps members consider all aspects of the motion).
  6. Following discussion, the chair calls for a vote (voting assures that more than half the members voting want a motion approved).
  • If the chair is unsure of the voting results, he or she may call for another vote with a show of hands or by having the members rise to vote.

An Amendment is used to change the wording of a main motion.

The wording may be changed by adding words, striking out words, or inserting words.

  1. During discussion of a main motion, a member who thinks the wording of the motion needs to be changed raises his or her hand.
  2. The chair calls on the member.
  3. The member presents the amendment by saying, “I move we amend the motion by inserting the words . . .” or “I move we amend the motion by striking out the words . . .” etc.
  4. Another member seconds the amendment.
  5. The president restates the amendment and calls for discussion. Discussion is based on the merits of the amendment, not the original motion.
  6. Following discussion, the chair calls for a vote.
  7. If the amendment passes, the chair calls for discussion on the motion as amended.
  8. If the amendment fails, the chair calls for further discussion on the original motion.
  9. The chair then calls for a vote on the motion as amended or the original motion (if the amendment failed).

Example of a Main Motion

  1. The chair says, “Is there any further new business?”
  2. Susan has an item she wants to discuss, so she raises her hand and sits quietly until the chair calls on her.
  3. Susan then says, “I move that the club donate five dollars per member to the Extension office from the club treasury.”
  4. Bill says, “I second the motion.” (The person seconding the motion may do so without being called on by the chair.)
  5. The chair says, “It has been moved and seconded that the club donate five dollars per member to the Extension office from the club treasury. Is there any discussion?”
  6. Members raise their hands and wait to be called on by the chair to discuss the motion.
  7. Following discussion, the chair repeats the motion and calls for a vote, “We shall now vote on the motion that the club donates five dollars per member to the Extension office from the club treasury. All those in favor say, ‘aye.’ All those opposed say, ‘nay.’ ”Motion passes (or fails).

Amendment Example

  1. During discussion on the main motion to donate five dollars to the Extension office from the club treasury, Kathy raises her hand and is called on by the chair.
  2. Kathy says, “I move to amend the motion by striking out the words, ‘from the club treasury’ and adding the words, ‘with profits from the bulb sale.’ ”
  3. Ted says, “I second the amendment.”
  4. The chair says, “It has been moved and seconded that we amend the motion by striking out ‘from the club treasury’ and adding ‘with profits from the bulb sale.’ Is there any discussion on the amendment?”
  5. Following discussion on the amendment, the chair repeats the amendment and calls for a vote, “We shall now vote on the amendment to strike out ‘from the club treasury’ and add ‘with profits from the bulb sale.’ All in favor say ‘aye.’ All opposed say ‘nay.’ ”Amendment passes (or fails).
  6. If the amendment passes, the chair says, “Is there any discussion on the motion as amended that the club donates five dollars per member to the Extension office with profits from the bulb sale?” The motion as amended would be voted on after discussion.
  7. If the amendment fails, the chair says, “The amendment fails. Is there any further discussion on the motion that the club donates five dollars per member to the Extension office from the club treasury?” The original motion would be voted on after discussion.

Referring to a Committee is used to give an item of business to a smaller group from the club for the purpose of gathering more information or to work out details.

  • The motion should include how many members should be on the committee, how the members are selected, when they report back, if they have the power to act, or if the club must vote on their recommendations.

Adjournment is used to end a meeting. If no motion is on the floor, a member may be recognized and say, “I move we adjourn the meeting.” A second is required. The chair repeats the motion and then takes the vote.

  • If a motion is on the floor and a member moves to adjourn, the motion still requires a second, but whether or not to adjourn must be discussed before the vote.

Example of Referring to a Committee

  1. During discussion on a motion to go on a field trip, Jim raises his hand and the chair calls on him.
  2. Jim says, “I move to refer the motion to go on a field trip to a committee of five volunteers to report back at the next meeting.”
  3. Amy says, “I second the motion.”
  4. The chair says, “It has been moved and seconded that the motion to go on a field trip be referred to a committee of five volunteers to report back at the next meeting. Is there any discussion on referring the motion to a committee?”
  5. Following discussion on referring the motion to a committee (NOT on the main motion), the chair repeats the motion and calls for a vote, “We shall now vote on referring the motion to go on a field trip to a committee of five volunteers to report back at the next meeting. All those in favor say ‘aye.’ All those opposed say ‘nay.’ Motion passes. Are there any volunteers to serve on the committee?”
  6. The chair picks five volunteers and instructs them to gather information and report to the club at the next meeting.
  7. If the motion to refer to a committee failed, the chair would say, “Motion to refer to a committee fails. Is there any further discussion on the motion to go on a field trip?” The motion would be voted on after discussion.

MORE BASIC PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE

Motion and Member Etiquette

  • Restate the motion clearly before discussing and voting.
  • Wait to confirm that a motion has a second. If it does not get a second, it dies (is not discussed further).
  • Allow the member who made the motion to discuss it first.
  • Discuss only one main motion at a time.
  • Making or seconding a motion does not necessarily mean the member favors the motion, only that he or she wants the motion on the floor for discussion.
  • When voting, the President votes only in the case of a tie. (If the President chooses not to vote in a tie, the motion fails).
  • Members do not have to vote if they choose not to. They also do not have to serve as an officer or committee member if they do not want to. Each member has the right to decline any nomination.

Use of the Gavel

The gavel symbolizes authority and the President should use it to run an orderly meeting. Club members and officers should understand the use and meaning of the gavel.

When the President taps the gavel -

One tap signals the completion of a motion and announces adjournment.

Two taps calls the meeting to order and signals officers to take their seats. If officers are seated and the gavel is rapped twice they should stand.

Three taps signals all members to stand.

  • A series of sharp, loud taps is used to restore order.

Ways to Vote

Voice Vote The president says “All in favor of the motion say ‘aye’. ”

Standing Vote Members stand so their votes can be counted.

Show of Hands Members raise their hands so the president can count their votes.

Ballot The President has one or more helpers hand out blank slips of paper so members can write their vote.

Roll Call Members vote as their name is called.

Honor System Members close their eyes and vote by raising their hands.

Order of Business

  1. Call to Order
  2. Pledge of Allegiance and 4-H Pledge
  3. Roll Call and Introduction of Visitors
  4. Reading and Approval of the Minutes from the Previous Meeting
  5. Introduction of Visitors
  6. Reading of Communications
  7. Treasurer’s Report
  8. Officer Reports
  9. Reports of Standing and Special Committees
  10. Unfinished Business
  11. New Business
  12. Leaders Report and Announcements
  13. Adjourn the Business Meeting
  14. Educational Program (speaker, demonstrations, etc.) – may be placed after roll call
  15. Recreation and/or Refreshments

The speed of the leader determines the pace of the pack.

  • - author unknown
  • NOTES
  • Appendix
  • Montana 4-H

President andVice President’s Forms

Forms also available online at www.montana4h.org/#resources

PRESIDENT’S SCRIPT FOR THE MEETING

The following guide can be used for planning and leading your 4-H club meeting. The terms/words to use for each part of the business meeting are listed in bold directly below each business meeting part. Keep this form for club records.

Agenda for (club name) ______________________________ meeting of (date) _____________

Pre-Meeting Activities ___________________________________________________________

AGENDA ITEM

  1. Call to order (President )

“This meeting will now come to order.” (tap gavel twice)

  1. Pledge of Allegiance and 4-H pledge

“Please stand for the Pledge of Allegiance led by .

“ will now lead us in the 4-H Pledge.”

  1. Roll Call (Secretary)

“The Secretary will now call the roll.”

  1. Introduction of Visitors (Vice President and Members)

“At this time would the Vice President and members please introduce their guests.”

  1. Minutes of previous meeting (Secretary)

“The secretary will now read the minutes of the previous meeting.”

Approval of minutes (President)

“Are there any additions or corrections to these minutes?” (pause.) “If not, they stand approved as read.” If there are corrections they are made by the President saying “Are there any further corrections to the minutes?” (pause.) “There being no further correction, the minutes stand approved as corrected.”

  1. Reading of Communications (Secretary)

“Are there any communications that have been sent since the last meeting?”

  1. Treasurer’s Report (Treasurer)

“May we have the Treasurer’s Report?” This report and other officer reports do not require further action.

  1. Other Officer Reports (Various Officers)

“Are there any other officers who would like to report at this time?”

  1. Committee Report from Standing and Special Committees (Various members)

“Will the chair of the committee please report.” Following the report the President says, “Does any member wish to present a motion to accept this report?” See page 13 for proper method for making a motion.

  1. Old/Unfinished Business

“Is there any old/unfinished business?”

  1. New Business

“We are now ready for new business. On the agenda is …” After items on the agenda have been addressed say, “Is there any other new business?”

  1. Organizational Leaders Report and Announcements

“Are there any further announcements?”

  1. Adjournment

“Is there a motion for adjournment?” After the motion has been made the President says, “Is there a second?” After the second has been made the President says, “It has been moved and seconded that we adjourn. All those in favor say ‘aye’, (pause for a vote) all opposed ‘nay’. The meeting is adjourned.”

  1. Educational Program (Vice President)

(Speaker demonstrations etc.) The educational program may be placed at a different time in the meeting to accommodate a speaker or program. After the speaker, the meeting would resume at the point the meeting was at before the speaker started.

“At this time I will call on to introduce tonight’s speaker” or “Present the program.”

  1. Recreation/Refreshments (Recreation Leader)

See appendix for meeting planning sheets and montana4h.org for blank and complete sheets.

19 Yearly President’s Report

As President of 4-H club I want to achieve the following things this year.

Describe your progress toward your goals and whether you achieved them.

What do you think were the accomplishments, challenges of the club/group?

In reflecting on your year as President, pick three of the quotes found throughout this book and relate them to what you have learned this year.

3.

20 Yearly Vice President’s Report

As Vice President of 4-H club I want to achieve the following things this year.

Describe your progress toward your goals and whether you achieved them.

Reflect on your year as Vice President; evaluate the club’s program plan. What things worked well?

What would you change for next year? How? Why?

Find one quote from this book and relate it to what you have learned this year.

Montana 4-H Treasurer's Record Book

Printable version of Montana 4-H Treasurer's Record Book (PDF)

Montana 4-HTreasurer’s Record Book

4-H 5242 Revised July 2015

County _______________________________________________

Name of Club __________________________________________

Name of Club Treasurer __________________________________

Year __________________________________________________

Montana 4-H Is a part of Montana State University Extension which is a part of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and your local county government. 4-H members are youth who chose to participate in Extension sponsored educational programs which are open to all youth.

The goal of Montana 4-H is to develop life skills and educate youth and adults for living in a global and changing world by using the resources of the Land-Grant Universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Montana 4-H Educational programs are 4-H Clubs, after-school programs, 4-H camps, school enrichment, community service, events and activities for young people and adults as they work towards attaining life skills such as:

  • Fostering positive self-concept
  • Learning decision-making skills and responsibility for choices
  • Developing an inquiring mind
  • Relating to self and others
  • Acquiring a concern for communities – bothlocal and global

Material adapted by:

Lea Ann LarsonMontana State University

Adapted from materials shared by:

Ohio 4-H Youth Development, Ohio State University Extension

Texas 4-H and Youth Development, Texas A&M System

Kansas 4-H, K-State Extension

Oklahoma 4-H, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

New Jersey 4-H, Rutgers Cooperative Extension

4-H Youth Development UW Extension, University of Wisconsin

Iowa 4-H, Iowa State University Extension

Designed by:Montana State University Extension

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Montana State University and the Montana State University Extension prohibit discrimination in all of their programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital and family status. Issued in furtherance of cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics, acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Jill Martz, Director of Extension, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 5971778 USC 707

The emblem of the 4-H program is a green four-leaf clover with a white H in each leaf. The four H’s stand for Head, Heart, Hands and Health and represent development of life skills.

HEAD: Learning to think, making decisions, understanding ‘why’, gaining new and valuable insights and acquiring knowledge.

HEART: Being concerned with the welfare of others, determining values and attitudes by which to live and learning how to work with others.

HANDS: Learning new skills, improving skills already developed, instilling pride in works, and earning respect for work accomplished.

HEALTH: Practicing healthful living, protecting the well-being of self and others, and making constructive use of leisure time.

This four-fold development is vital to every individual. Each of the H’s should be an important part of the goals youth identify as they participate in 4-H sponsored programs and educational activities.

Congratulations on your newly elected office. You, and all other officers of your 4-H club, represent not only your club, but the 4-H program in your county and throughout the state. Your skills and abilities, standards and ideals, grooming, speech and even attitude represent all Montana 4-H members. Representing others is one of your most important responsibilities because it exists at all times – not just while you are at 4-H events.

Being elected your 4-H club Treasurer is an honor and a responsibility. The members who elected you know that you’ll serve as a trustworthy and hard working leader. This book is designed to share suggestions and expectations for doing your job accurately and effectively. Since your position involves money, there are financial management rules that must be followed at all times so ask questions of anything you don’t understand and work with a leader who will help you process financial information correctly. This book teaches you how to manage finances – a skill that will serve you well throughout your life. You are providing your club and yourself a great service by offering your services and learning new skills.

—— Table of Contents ——

Treasurer’s Job Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Best Practices for Treasurers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Treasurer’s Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Beginning of the Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Before, During & after a meeting . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Year-end Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Appointing the Financial

Review Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Financial Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

When a Club Disbands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Handling Money Recieved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

TRAINING ACTIVITY 1

Paying Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

TRAINING ACTIVITY 2

Reconciling Bank Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

TRAINING ACTIVITY 3

Preparing a Treasurer’s Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

TRAINING ACTIVITY 4

Year-end Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

TRAINING ACTIVITY 5

For Leaders and Parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Tax-Exempt Status & IRS Requirements . . . . 34

APPENDIX - Forms and Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Understanding what is expected of you and knowing how to do it is a key to being successful in this important position. This section of the booklet guides you through your roles and responsibilities, how to do your job effectively and how to present information clearly. There are also sections which give you opportunities to learn and practice keeping financial records. Good luck as you take on this important role.

Treasurer’s Job Description

  • Handle all money matters of the club - maintaining current and accurate financial records. Keep an accurate record of all income and expenses. It is recommended that this book and all the club financial records be kept in a three ring
  • Deposit all funds in the bank as soon as possible – and ideally within a week.
  • Pay all bills promptly after approval by the club. Pay by check only, and have background paperwork for all bills paid.
  • Collect dues (if your club has them) and keep accurate records of dues paid.
  • Write receipts for all money collected and maintain a copy of receipts in your records.
  • Prepare a budget to guide the club, with the help of the Finance Committee and club leader.
  • Prepare an accurate Treasurer’s report for each meeting.
  • Complete your Treasurer’s Record Book, including the Year-end Financial Summary Report (Appendix, page 43) for review by the Financial Review Committee. They will need your completed Treasurer’s record book along with the Club budget
  • Check register
  • Bank statements
  • Cancelled checks and deposit slips
  • Receipts of all income
  • Bills for all expenses
  • List of any physical property the club owns
  • Copy of Secretary’s Minutes authorizing financial transactions
  • After the Financial Review Committee completes their review, they will turn in a signed copy of the Year-end Financial Summary Report to the county Extension office for their records.
  • Check with your county office for deadlines and what supporting documentation they would like with the report. It varies from county to county.

Best Practices for Treasurers

  • Never mix your own money with club money. Never use club money for your personal needs. Both of these practices are illegal.
  • Spend money with club approval only – a motion, second and passing vote must be included in the meeting minutes before you spend anything.
  • If an unforeseen situation comes up and money must be spent before an official business meeting can take place, get the approval of the entire Executive Committee (President, Vice-President, Secretary, as well as the Organizational Leader) in writing or by e-mail.

TREASURER’S RESPONSIBILITIES

Beginning of the Year

At the beginning of the 4-H year, obtain the club funds and records from the previous Treasurer. This will need to be done after the Financial Review Committee has finished its annual review.

  1. Check to be sure the amount of money you receive agrees with the Year-end Financial Summary Report and the previous Treasurer’s records.
  2. In the Record of Club Finances or the Check Register (depending on which form your club uses) date column, write the month you begin to serve as Treasurer. Then write on the line “Balance on hand $_____,” the amount of money in the club treasury when you received the records. The Record of Club Finances form can be found in the Appendix on page 39.
  3. Update the bank account information for the club.
  4. Make sure the bank account(s) are in the name of your 4-H club and that the club has an Employer Identification Number (EIN) on file at the bank for the club. A club treasury must never be under the name of a leader or other individual or their personal Social Security number.
  5. With the help of the Organizational Leader, go to the bank and update the signature card and address for the bank account. It is a State 4-H policy that all 4-H accounts must have two signatures on all checks.
  6. A majority of clubs list the Treasurer, President and an adult leader as signatories. The club may have guidelines or a bylaw provision for who is allowed a signature on the account.
  7. Some banks will not accept a minor as a signatory. In these cases, it may be necessary to have three leaders (from different families) as signatories.
  8. If the Treasurer is not a signatory on the bank accounts, he/she should write out the checks and then have two of the people who are signatories sign them.
    1. Monthly bank statements should be sent to a leader who is not a signatory on the account. This leader should review the statement, and then give it to the treasurer to reconcile with Record of Club Finances or the Check Register. A sample Reconciliation Form can be found in the Appendix on page 40.
    2. Work with your Finance Committee and club leader to put together a tentative budget to present to the whole club as soon as possible in the new 4-H year. The club should discuss and approve the budget. There is a sample budget sheet in the Appendix on page 38 or you can make your own.
    3. The budget is a financial guide just as the Yearly Program Plan (see the Secretaries Handbook, 4-H 5327) is a program guide for the club. When setting up the budget, looking at the historic numbers will help decide the amounts. Also look at the Yearly Program Plan to see where and when the club will be spending or making money.
    4. Receipts include dues, potential fundraising events, and estimated profit. Example: If the club has traditionally had a fundraiser that brings in about $100, then an estimate of $100 in income could be recorded on the budget.
    5. Expenses include items such as club outings, donations to worthy causes, meeting location rental fees, refreshments for parties, fair decorations, supplies for community service activities, postage, etc. Example: the club helps a local charity with sorting and giving away toys; last year the club also gave money to purchase toys for the charity. The members would like to do that again this year as their service project. The budget should reflect the anticipated donation.
    6. Keep all records up-to-date monthly and give a financial report at each club meeting.

To make record-keeping easier, this book has been designed to be put in a 3-ring binder. Pocket folders can be added to hold bills and receipts. Punch holes in your bank statements and other financial documents and include them in this notebook.

Excel spreadsheets or a simple accounting program may be helpful if you prefer to keep your records on a computer. If computerized programs are used, be sure to print out the ledger and reports and add them to the binder so that there are paper backups of the information.

Before, During and After a Meeting

  • Before each 4-H meeting update all club financial records, making sure they are correct and up-to-date, and complete a Treasurer’s report to share with the club. See Training Activity 3 to learn how to reconcile the bank account and fill out a Treasurer’s report (Appendix, page 41).
  • The report should include all transactions since the beginning of the last meeting.
  • Include all receipts turned in and any bills paid since the last meeting.
  • Make a copy of the Treasurer’s report for the secretary to include in the official meeting minutes.

As Treasurer, you will need to give the Treasurer’s report and present any current bills that need to be paid during the meeting. After the bills are presented the Treasurer may make the motion to pay the bills by stating “I move that the club pay ……….bill.” By making the motion yourself you insure that the club takes action on the bills you presented. Also be sure to write receipts for any money received during the meeting.

After the meeting, pay all bills approved by the club and deposit any money received as soon as possible. Update the Record of Club Finances or the Check Register immediately when checks are written or money deposited. See Section 2 Training Activities to learn how to fill out deposit slips and write checks as well as how to record them in the Record of Club Finances or the Check Register. Always keep copies of paid bills and receipts in the 3-ring binder with your other financial records.

Year-end Procedures

  • As the treasurer, you have been entrusted throughout the 4-H year to make timely and accurate reports to your 4-H club regarding the finances of the club. At the end of the 4-H year, you will need to complete the Year-end Financial Summary Report (Appendix, page 43) and present the Treasurers Record Book to a Financial Review Committee for their review.

Procedures for a Financial Review Committee

  1. Check each month’s reconciled bank statement and cancelled checks. Make sure the ledger (check register) postings are current and complete.
  2. Examine all voided checks. If a voided check is not on file, verify that the check has not cleared the bank.
  3. Total all funds received. Verify that cash receipts were written and that funds received were listed on the ledger reports.
  4. Total all deposits made to bank account. This total should equal the total of all funds received.
  5. Total all expenditures.

- Verify that a written bill (or store receipt) is on file for each expenditure.

- Verify that all expenditures were paid by check, not cash.

  1. The Treasurer’s total balance at the beginning of the year, plus all funds received, minus all expenditures, must equal the Treasurer’s total balance at the end of the year.
  2. Examine the Year-end Financial Summary Report that the Treasurer has filled out. Do the balances on the report match the total balances reflected in the ledger?
  3. Examine club minutes for monthly financial reports and club approval of all expenditures.
  4. If the 4-H group has accepted in-kind donations, examine the club inventory sheet and make sure that a letter or receipt is on file for each item. Document the donor and date given, along with where it is located. The group accepting the in-kind donation does not assign a value to an item, the donor is responsible for doing so.
  5. Report the committee findings.
  6. If the committee finds errors or omissions that need to be corrected, the committee should meet with the Treasurer and explain the findings, then the group makes the corrections. When the committee feels that the errors are corrected, two members of the Financial Review Committee will complete and sign the Year-end Financial Review Certificate at the bottom of the Year-end Financial Summary Report and then turn in the report to the county Extension office.
  7. If the committee finds all is correct, two members of the Financial Review Committee will complete and sign the Year-end Financial Review Certificate at the bottom of the Year-end Financial Summary Report and turn the report into county Extension office.
  • NOTE: By signing the Year-end Financial Review Certificate the committee members are stating that they have reviewed the books and to the best of their knowledge the books are correct.

The first step in preparing the books for review is to promptly pay any bills approved at the last 4-H meeting, deposit any money that is on hand, and reconcile the last bank statement for the year. This will give you a record of all checks that have cleared the bank and those that are still outstanding. Then make updates to the Record of Club Finances or the Check Register.

Next, organize all bank statements, the club’s receipts book, and all the bills for the year. Remember, each time the club received income a receipt should have been written. Also, when you paid a bill at the direction of club members you should have had a receipt verify what was purchased or why the check was written. Checks that do not have a corresponding receipt can be verified through club minutes as a backup reference. All voided checks should also be included in the records.

  • Update the list of any physical property the club owns and include in the list where the items are kept.

Prepare a Detailed Summary Report of Income and Expenses (Appendix, page 42). This report is helpful to organize the expenses and income of the club. An electronic copy can be found at montana4h.org; if the club keeps their books on a different computer bookkeeping program, generate a report that shows income and expenses for the year.

Prepare and sign a Year-end Financial Summary Report (Appendix, page 43). An electronic copy can be found at montana4h.org. When you sign the report you are stating that to the best of your knowledge all the balances on the report are correct and that all the financial information for the club is in order.

  • After you have prepared the reports and all the documentation described previously, a copy of all the club minutes and your Treasurer’s Record Book should be given to the Finance Review Committee.

4-H records to keep and maintain

Item

How long to keep original

Does the county Extension office need a copy?

Charter

permanent

Yes

Constitution and Bylaws

permanent

Yes, the most current copy. They should be dated and signed.

EIN Paperwork (if applicable)

permanent

Yes

Audit or Financial Review

7 years

Yes

Year-end Financial Summary

7 years

Yes

990 filing confirmation letter

7 years

Yes

Bank Records

3 years

As requested, check with the local county Extension office

Donor Records and Acknowledgement Letter

3 years

As requested, check with the local county Extension office

Grant paperwork

3 years after completion

As requested, check with the local county Extension office

Meeting Minutes

3 years

Yes

Correspondence

3 years

No

Yearly Program Plan

3 years

Yes

Appointing the Financial Review Committee

It is Montana 4-H Policy that all 4-H clubs and committees have their books reviewed by an independent committee at the end of each 4-H year.

The club President should appoint a Financial Review Committee of at least two people. It may be more if the club, committee or council would like, or if it is specified in the bylaws or policies of the group.

The Financial Review Committee members may be 4-H leaders, 4-H members, county staff or community member. It is encouraged that senior 4-H members be included on the committee.

Members of the Financial Review Committee may not be the Treasurer, from the Treasurer’s family or be a signatory on the checking account.

Financial Records

  • Clubs need to have a place to keep the records so they can easily be found. County offices will give clubs and other groups direction on their preferences for collecting and maintaining records. Check the table on the previous page for how long the listed documents should be kept and if a copy should be given to the county Extension office. If the 4-H Center for Youth Development requires a copy of the information, the county office is responsible for collecting it from the club or group and forwarding a copy to the center.

Check with your local county 4-H Extension office for other requirements the county may have regarding how long and where records are kept.

When a Club Disbands

As the Treasurer of a 4-H club that is disbanding, you have the responsibility to make sure all the club bank accounts are properly closed and all club assets, money and property properly distributed. Any items purchased under the name and emblem of 4-H, such as guns for shooting sports or clippers for animal projects, are considered club property. The steps to closing the books for a disbanding club are:

  • Pay all outstanding bills as approved by the club.
  • Update the record of club finances and Treasurer’s Record Book, including the list of club property and where it is located.
  • Prepare a Year-end Financial Summary Report, even if it is not the end of the year.
  • Ask the President to appoint a Financial Review Committee
  • Work with the organizational leader to formally close the account at the bank.
  • Turn money and property over to the county 4-H Council.

The balance of a club treasury may NEVER be divided among members.

  • For more information on disbanding or splitting a club, request the Montana 4-H Program Policies and Procedures from the county Extension office or find it online.

Tax Exempt Status and IRS Requirements

  • All clubs that have bank accounts must have an Employee Identification Number (EIN). See page 34 for more information.

Training Activities for Treasurers

  • As Treasurer of your club you have many responsibilities that may be new to you. This section of the Treasurer’s Record Book is for you to practice the record-keeping skills that are required to be a treasurer. This section of the book is also designed to refer back to if you have questions as you start to work on the club’s books. The correct answers follow each practice exercise.

HANDLING MONEY RECEIVED

Writing a Receipt

  • The Treasurer must write a receipt for all money received. The Treasurer, Vice President and an advisor should count all money received and the amount should equal the total amount of the receipts. The Treasurer should immediately write out a deposit ticket for that amount and make a deposit as soon as possible and definitely within a few days. This deposit may be made by a leader or the treasurer. Don’t forget to include the breakdown of money received in the Club Record of Club Finances.

Filling Out a Deposit Ticket

  • Date the deposit ticket.
  • Fill in the amount of currency (paper money) and coins you are depositing.
  • List each check separately, by number and amount. Use the back of the deposit ticket if necessary. (Total the checks on the back and put this amount in “Total from other side” blank.) Add cash and checks together and put that total in the space provided.
  • Record the deposit in the check register.
  • After making the deposit, put the deposit receipt in an envelope in your 3-ring binder.
  • You should never keep cash back from a deposit. If your club needs cash to make change for a fund-raising activity, write a check for “CASH” to the bank. Be sure to note what the cash is for in the memo line.
  • —— Training Activity 1 —— Handling Money Received

Training Scenario: Let’s see how much you have learned about taking money in.

  • You are the treasurer for the Clover Clan 4-H Club.
  • You are at your November 12 club meeting.
  • The club voted to have the Treasurer get a receipt book at their meeting on October 26. The Treasurer, Adam Green, purchased the receipt book and turned in a sales slip for $5.23. He received club check Number (No.) 100 on November 5 for $5.23.
  • Club dues are $5.00 per member.
  • Mary & Molly Newcomer give you $10.00 cash for their dues.
  • Jason Wyatt gives you a check (No. 1352), signed by his mom, Marsha Samples, for $10.00 ($5.00 for dues and $5.00 for his project book).
  • Fred and Linda Oldhouse give you a check (No. 5008), signed by their dad, Frederick Oldhouse, for $25.00 ($5.00 each for dues, $5.00 for Fred’s project book, and $10.00 for two project books for Linda).
  • Sam Jones gives you $15.00 cash for his dues and two project books.
  • Bobbie Adams turns in his dues He gives you three $1.00 bills and eight quarters.
  • Ima Clover is the organizational leader of the club and a signatory.
  • Al Doright is the Extension agent and a signatory, but will not sign checks.
  1. Write out receipts for the Newcomer & Oldhouse families.
  • RECEIPT 1001
  • Received of ______________________________________________________________________
  • Payment as indicated below:

Date

Purpose

Cash or Check No.

Amount

Signed

9 II. Fill out a deposit ticket.

DEPOSIT TICKET CASH 4

Clover Clan 4-H Club ______________ 4

4 Clover Way, Apt. H ______________ 4

Cloverville,MT 44444 ______________ 4

(or total from other side)

DATE ________________ SUBTOTAL4

DEPOSITS MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE LESS CASH RECEIVED4

FOR IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL

$

SIGN HERE FOR CASH RECEIVED (IF REQUIRED)

THE COMMUNITY BANK

|: 0 4 1 2 1 6 3 |: 44-HHHH

III. Update your Record of Club Finances.

  • Record of Club Finances Club Name_______Clover Clan 4-H Club_______________ Year___2012_____ The Financial Record allows you to keep your club treasury records up to date. Begin the record sheet with the ending balance from last year’s treasurer’s manual. Record every transaction on this record sheet and keep a running balance of money in the club treasury. Date Money Received -- Name & Purpose and Payments Made -- Name & Purpose Check Number Money Received (+) Payments Made (-) Balance Balance at the beginning of the year X XX$173.65 11/5/12 Christopher Adams - Reimburse receipt book 100 $5.23 $168.42
  • 10 Answer Key:
  1. Write out receipts for the Newcomer & Oldhouse families.
  • RECEIPT 1001
  • Received of Mary and Molly Newcomer
  • Payment as indicated below:

Date

Purpose

Cash or Check No.

Amount

11/12/2012

Mary - $5.00 dues

Molly - $5.00 dues

Cash

$10.00

Signed

Christopher Adams

         
  • 11 Update your Record of Club Finances.

Record of Club Finances

Club Name_______Clover Clan 4-H Club_______________

Year___2012_____

The Financial Record allows you to keep your club treasury records up to date. Begin the record

sheet with the ending balance from last year’s treasurer’s manual. Record every transaction on this

record sheet and keep a running balance of money in the club treasury.

Date

Money Received -- Name & Purpose

and

Payments Made -- Name & Purpose

Check

Number

Money

Received

(+)

Payments

Made

(-)

Balance

Balance at the beginning of the year

X

X

X

$173.65

11/5/12

Christopher Adams - Reimburse receipt book

100

$5.23

$168.42

11/12/12

Molly and Mary Newcomer - $10 dues

$10.00

$178.42

11/12/12

Jason Wyatt - $5 dues, $5 project book

$10.00

$188.42

11/12/12

Fred and Linda Oldhouse - $10 dues, $15 books

$25.00

$213.42

11/12/12

Sam Jones - $5 dues, $10 project book

$15.00

$228.42

11/12/12

Bobbie Adams - $5 dues

$5.00

$233.42

                           

PAYING BILLS

Writing a Check

  • Fill out the check register with the check number, date, amount, name of payee (the person or business to whom the check is written) and purpose of the payment. The check register should also show the balance before and after deducting the check amount.
  • Use ink.
  • Never erase – if you make a mistake, start a new check and write VOID on the old one. Keep voided checks in your file.
  • Be sure to date the check.
  • Enter the name of the person or business to which the check is written as close to the “Pay to the order of” as possible.
  • Do not leave a space between dollars and cents. This helps stop someone from changing a $1.00 check into a $100 or $1000 check. Correct: 10 and 34/100 Incorrect: 10 and 34/100
  • Begin at the extreme left in writing the amount. Be sure the written amount agrees with the numeric amount. Draw a line from where the writing ends to the end of the line.
  • If a check is for less than $1, write the word “Only” and then the amount.
  • Sign the check the same way you signed the signature card at the bank.
  • Obtain required signatures from other account signatories.
  • Always know where all checks, bank state­ments and deposit slips are by storing them together in a secure place. It is recommended that you keep all of your treasurer’s records together in a 3-ring binder. (Zipper envelopes like those for school pencils work well.)
  • Make sure you write what the check is paying for on the memo line.
  • Update your Record of Club Finances to reflect the check(s) written.

Checking Account Register

  • Write the number of the check and the date it was written in the correct columns.
  • In the “Transaction Description” column, write to whom the check was written.
  • Enter the check amount in the “Payment Amount” column and then subtract the amount from the remaining balance above and enter the new balance in the balance column straight across from the payment amount.
  • “ü” is a column to check off when the check or deposit appears on your bank statement.
  • “Fee” is a column to list any costs for cashing checks.
  • Remember to Subtract the check amount (and any fee) from the balance.
  • When a deposit is made, the amount is recorded in the “Deposit Amount” column.
  • Add the amount of the deposit to the balance.

Endorsing Checks

An endorsement is a signature.

  1. To be cashed, a check must be endorsed by whomever the check is made payable to.
  2. All endorsements are made on the back of the check, where designated.
  3. Endorse checks immediately, using a restrictive endorsement including the club name, the treasurer’s name, and the words “For Deposit Only.”

Example:

Clover Clan 4-H Club

Christopher Adams

  • For Deposit Only

13 —— Training Activity 2 —— Paying Bills

Training Scenario: Now it’s time to pay money out.

  • Your club voted at the last meeting, on November 12, to have officer installation at the next meeting, November 26, with the club buying pizza and pop for refreshments.
  • It is now November 26. The pizza & pop has been ordered from Pizza Land. One of the leaders is getting ready to go pick it up.
  • The total cost for the pizza and pop is $68.50.
  • The next check in the checkbook is 101.
  1. Update the club checkbook register prior to writing the check.

NUMBER OR CODE

DATE

TRANSACTION DESCRIPTION

PAYMENT

AMOUNT

ü

FEE

DEPOSIT

AMOUNT

BALANCE

$ 173.65

100

11/5/2012

Christopher Adams

5

23

168

42

Reimbursement for receipt book

11/12/2012

Deposit - Dues & Books (Newcomer,

65

00

233

42

Wyatt, Oldhouse, Adams, Jones)

                             
  • 14 Update your Record of Club Finances.

Record of Club Finances

Club Name_______Clover Clan 4-H Club_______________

Year___2012_____

The Financial Record allows you to keep your club treasury records up to date. Begin the record

sheet with the ending balance from last year’s treasurer’s manual. Record every transaction on this

record sheet and keep a running balance of money in the club treasury.

Date

Money Received -- Name & Purpose

and

Payments Made -- Name & Purpose

Check

Number

Money

Received

(+)

Payments

Made

(-)

Balance

Balance at the beginning of the year

X

X

X

$173.65

11/5/12

Christopher Adams - Reimburse receipt book

100

$5.23

$168.42

11/12/12

Molly and Mary Newcomer - $10 dues

$10.00

$178.42

11/12/12

Jason Wyatt - $5 dues, $5 project book

$10.00

$188.42

11/12/12

Fred and Linda Oldhouse - $10 dues, $15 books

$25.00

$213.42

11/12/12

Sam Jones - $5 dues, $10 project book

$15.00

$228.42

11/12/12

Bobbie Adams - $5 dues

$5.00

$233.42

                           
  • 14 Update your Record of Club Finances.

Record of Club Finances

Club Name_______Clover Clan 4-H Club_______________

Year___2012_____

The Financial Record allows you to keep your club treasury records up to date. Begin the record

sheet with the ending balance from last year’s treasurer’s manual. Record every transaction on this

record sheet and keep a running balance of money in the club treasury.

Date

Money Received -- Name & Purpose

and

Payments Made -- Name & Purpose

Check

Number

Money

Received

(+)

Payments

Made

(-)

Balance

Balance at the beginning of the year

X

X

X

$173.65

11/5/12

Christopher Adams - Reimburse receipt book

100

$5.23

$168.42

11/12/12

Molly and Mary Newcomer - $10 dues

$10.00

$178.42

11/12/12

Jason Wyatt - $5 dues, $5 project book

$10.00

$188.42

11/12/12

Fred and Linda Oldhouse - $10 dues, $15 books

$25.00

$213.42

11/12/12

Sam Jones - $5 dues, $10 project book

$15.00

$228.42

11/12/12

Bobbie Adams - $5 dues

$5.00

$233.42

                           

16 RECONCILING BANK STATEMENTS

Bank statements are usually received monthly. A bank statement includes the account balance at the beginning of the month, any deposits made, any checks written, any fees charged to the account and an ending balance.

  • Your treasury records must be reconciled to (agree with) the bank statement each month.
  • Use the Checkbook Balancing/Reconciliation Form on the back of the bank statement for your monthly reconciliation. A sample form may be found on page 18 as well as on page 3 of the Appendix.

To check the figures on the bank statement, do this:

  1. Add the amount of deposits during the month and the balance carried forward from the previous bank statement.
  2. From this total subtract the total of the service charge, if any, and the checks that are included in the bank statement.
  3. This should be the same as the new balance on the statement.
  • Cancelled checks, or a copy of them, if any, may be included with the statement. If a check you wrote is not with the other checks, list it in “Outstanding Checks” at the bottom left of the Checkbook Balancing/ Reconciliation Form.
  • If you cannot balance (amounts don’t agree), take the statement and your records to an advisor and ask them to check it.
  • If you think there is an error in the bank statement, take the statement and your treasury records to the bank and ask them to check it.

Service Charge

Some banks have a service charge for handling an account. Usually a few cents are charged for each check written and for each deposit. If your club is charged a service charge in any month, there will be a notation on the bank statement showing the amount.

  • The amount for the service charge should be shown as an expenditure on the Checkbook. Balancing/Reconciliation Form for the month.
  • The service charge must also be listed in your check register as a payment amount.

17 —— Training Activity 3 —— Reconciling a Bank Statement

Training Scenario: Making it balance is important.

  • Your monthly bank statement has arrived. You must reconcile the bank statement with your records.
  • Your bank statement:

The Community Bank Statement

Clover Clan 4-H Club Date 11/31/2012 Page 1

4 Clover Way, Apt. H Account Number 44-HHHH

Cloverville,MT 44444

- - - CHECKING ACCOUNTS - - -

Previous Balance 173.65 Statement Dates 11/01/12 thru 11/30/12

1 Deposits/Credits 65.00 Days in the statement period 30

1 Checks/Debits 68.50

Service Charge 4.00

Interest Paid 0.00

Ending Balance 166.15

Deposits and Additions

Date Description Amount

11/13 DDA REGULAR DEPOSIT 65.00

Checks in Serial Number Order

Date Check No. Amount

11/27 *101 68.50

* Indicates Skip in Check Number

Daily Balance Information

Date Balance Date Balance Date Balance Date Balance

  • 11/01 173.65 11/13 238.65 11/27 170.15 11/31 166.15

Reconcile the bank statement on the Checkbook Balancing/Reconciliation Form.

CHECKBOOK BALANCING/RECONCILIATION FORM

  • This form should be used to compare your bank statement ending balance and your checkbook register to make sure they are balanced (equal) each month.

8 OUTSTANDING DEPOSITS

STEPS TO RECONCILE/BALANCE ACCOUNT

(Not included in your statement)

1) Ending balance from your checkbook ledger

DATE

AMOUNT

2) Subtract total outstanding deposits (A)

-

3) Add total outstanding checks (B)

+

4) Subtract bank fees*

-

Total Outstanding Deposits

Total A

5) Add interest earned*

+

6) Adjusted balance (should equal bank statement)

=

OUTSTANDING CHECKS

(Not included in your statement)

Check #

Written To:

Amount

Total Outstanding Checks

Total B

* Bank fees & interest earned will show up on your bank statement and should be recorded in your checkbook ledger AFTER you balance (reconcile) your account.

           
  • 19 Update the checkbook register to reflect any changes.
  • Update the Record of Club Finances so that all records match.

NUMBER OR CODE

DATE

TRANSACTION DESCRIPTION

PAYMENT

AMOUNT

ü

FEE

DEPOSIT

AMOUNT

BALANCE

$ 173.65

100

11/5/2012

Christopher Adams

5

23

168

42

Reimbursement for receipt book

11/12/2012

Deposit - Dues & Books (Newcomer,

ü

65

00

233

42

Wyatt, Oldhouse, Adams, Jones)

101

11/26/2012

Pizza Land

68

50

ü

164

92

Pizza and pop for Installation

                                 

Answer Key:

  1. Reconcile the bank statement on the Checkbook Balancing/Reconciliation Form.

CHECKBOOK BALANCING/RECONCILIATION FORM

  • This form should be used to compare your bank statement ending balance and your checkbook register to make sure they are balanced (equal) each month.

20 OUTSTANDING DEPOSITS

STEPS TO RECONCILE/BALANCE ACCOUNT

(Not included in your statement)

1) Ending balance from

your checkbook ledger

$164.92

DATE

AMOUNT

2) Subtract total outstanding

deposits (A)

-

3) Add total outstanding

checks (B)

+

$5.23

4) Subtract bank fees*

-

$4.00

Total Outstanding Deposits

Total A

5) Add interest earned*

+

6) Adjusted balance (should

equal bank statement)

=

$166.15

OUTSTANDING CHECKS

(Not included in your statement)

Check #

Written To:

Amount

100

Christopher Adams

$5.23

Total Outstanding Checks

$5.23

Total B

  • * Bank fees & interest earned will show up on your bank statement and should be recorded in your checkbook ledger AFTER you balance (reconcile) your account.
  • 21 Update the checkbook register to reflect any changes.

NUMBER OR CODE

DATE

TRANSACTION DESCRIPTION

PAYMENT

AMOUNT

ü

FEE

DEPOSIT

AMOUNT

BALANCE

$ 173.65

100

11/5/2012

Christopher Adams

5

23

168

42

Reimbursement for receipt book

11/12/2012

Deposit - Dues & Books (Newcomer,

ü

65

00

233

42

Wyatt, Oldhouse, Adams, Jones)

101

11/26/2012

Pizza Land

68

50

ü

164

92

Pizza and pop for Installation

11/31/2012

Service Fee

ü

4.00

160

92

November 1 - November 31

                                     

22 PREPARING A TREASURER’S REPORT

  • The Treasurer needs to provide an accurate report of club finances at each meeting.
  • The report needs to reflect all activity in the treasury since the last meeting.
  • The report should follow this format:
  1. Beginning balance (closing balance from previous meeting)
  2. Money received (list each item with the dollar amount, who it was from, and the purpose)
  3. Total received (add all of the money received amounts)
  4. Expenses (list each item with the dollar amount, who was paid, and what it was for)
  5. Total expenses (add all of the expense amounts)
  6. Closing Balance (beginning balance + total received – total expenses.)
  • The closing balance is the actual balance you have in your records and in the bank. It will be the new beginning balance for the next meeting.
    • When you make your report: Begin with the previous balance (1). “The beginning balance was $______(2). Income was $______ from ________ for ________ and $______from ________ for ________, etc., for a total amount received of $___________(3). Expenses were $_______ to _______ for _______ and $_______ to _______ for _______, (4)etc., for total expenses of $ ______(5). This leaves us with a closing balance of $______(6).” • Present any outstanding bills for payment. “We have a bill from _________ (store or individual) for $_______ (amount) for ______ (what it was for).” • Expenses should be approved by the club prior to the transaction taking place.• Club members should pass a motion to approve payment before any bill is paid.• The secretary must record the motion, second and whether the motion passed or failed in the minutes.• Approved transactions should take place and be recorded as soon as possible after the meeting.

23 —— Training Activity 4 — —Preparing a Treasurer’s Report

Training Scenario: Preparing for a meeting.

  • It is November 26. Your club is meeting later today. You need to prepare a treasurer’s report for the meeting.
  • Your last meeting was November 12. (Refer to Training Activity 1 for financial transactions at that meeting.)
  • See sample report form below.
  1. Fill out a Treasurer’s Report form.

Treasurer’s Report

The Treasurer’s Report informs members of the club’s financial activity since the last meeting. Complete the Treasurer’s Report and present it to the club for each meeting.

________________________________________________________

4-H Club Name

Treasurer’s Report for ____________________________________

(Date of Meeting)

  1. Beginning account balance: $_____________________ (closing balance from previous meeting) Date of Previous Meeting: _____________________
  2. Money received:

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

Total money received $__________________________

  1. Expenses:

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

Total expenses $__________________________

  1. Closing balance: $ _______________________
    1. Submitted by: __________________

24 II. Prepare your report for the club.

  • “The beginning balance was $ . Income was $ from for , and $ from for , for a total amount received of $ . There were no expenses. This leaves us with a closing balance of $ .

25 Answer Key:

  1. Fill out a Treasurer’s Report form.

Treasurer’s Report

The treasurer’s report informs members of the club’s financial activity since the last meeting. Complete the Treasurer’s Report and present it to the club for each meeting.

Clover Clan 4-H Club

4-H Club Name

Treasurer’s Report for November 26, 2012

(Date of Meeting)

  1. Beginning account balance: $ 168.42 (closing balance from previous meeting) Date of Previous Meeting: November 12, 2012 Money received:

$ 10 from Mary and Molly Newcomer_for what purpose dues

$ 10 from Jason Wyatt__________ for what purpose dues and project book

$ 25 from Fred and Linda Oldhouse__ for what purpose dues and project book

$ 25 from Sam Jones___________ for what purpose dues and project book

$ 5 from Bobbie Adams__________ for what purpose dues

Total money received $ 65.00

  1. Expenses: None

$ _______ to ___________________ for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________ for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________ for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________ for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________ for what purpose __________________________

Total expenses $__________________________

  1. Closing balance: $ __233.42_____________________
  2. Submitted by: __Christopher Adams______________

(Treasurer)

  1. Prepare your report for the club.

“The beginning balance was $ 168.42 . Income was $ 35.00 from Mary and Molly Newcomver, Jason Wyatt, Fred and Linda Oldhouse, Sam Jones and Bobbie Adams for dues , and $ 30.00 from Jason Wyatt, Fred and Linda Oldhouse, and Sam Jones for Project books , for a total amount received of $ 65.00 . There were no expenses. This leaves us with a closing balance of $ 233.42 .

  • –– This report should be given to the secretary so that it may be recorded accurately in the minutes ––
  • YEAR-END REPORTS

The job of the Treasurer is not finished until the financial records are closed and reviewed at the end of the year. Closing the books with the simple accounting methods 4-H clubs use means that the balance the bank shows is equal to the balance of the account after the last month (September) of the 4-H year is reconciled. That amount is the closing balance.

  • After you have the closing balance, the Year-end Financial Summary Report needs to be completed. Preparing a Detailed Summary of Income and Expenses Report will help treasurers organize the income (deposits) and expenses (checks written) for the Year-end Financial Summary Report.

Then after the reports are done, gather the Treasurer’s Handbook together with all its documentation and give it to the Financial Review Committee appointed by the president. See page 6 for who can be on the review committee and the procedure for reviewing the books.

  • Following is a year’s Record of Finance; use it to fill out the Detailed Summary of Income and Expenses Report and Year-end Financial Summary Report.

Training Scenario: It’s time to do the year-end reports.

  • Page 27 has a complete year of transactions for the Clover Clan 4-H Club. Use it to fill out the Detailed Summary of Income and Expense report on page 28 and the Treasurer’s part of the Year-end Financial Summary Report on Page 29.
  • The club EIN number is 84-0000000.
  • The club had a beginning balance of $173.65.
  • Use the Detail Summary Report to figure the club’s income and expense for the year.
  • The club ending balance Setember 30 (beginning balance + total received – total expenses).
  • The club has a savings account with a beginning balance of $250.45. The club earned $2.92 in interest for the year and there was no money spent from the savings account this year.
  • Figure the one percent Assessment Fee on the ending balance by multiplying the ending balance by .01.
  • Look back to the other training exercises to find bank and signature information.
  • The club has no cash outside of the money that is held in the club bank accounts. At the end of the year all money should be accounted for in the bank.
  • The president has appointed a committee to review the books. (See page 4 for who can
  • 27 —— Training Activity 5 — —Year-End Reports

Record of Club Finances

Club Name: Clover Clan 4-H Club

Year: 2012

Date

Money Received - Name and Purpose OR

Payments Made - Name and Purpose

Check Number

Money Received (+)

Payments Made (-)

Balance

Balance at the beginning of the year

X

X

X

$173.65

11/05/12

Christopher Adams - Reimburse Reciept book

100

$5.23

$168.42

11/05/12

Molly and Mary Newcomer - $10 dues

$10.00

$178.42

11/05/12

Jason Wyatt - $5 dues, $5 Project books

$10.00

$188.42

11/05/12

Fred & Linda Oldhouse - $10 dues, $15 books

$25.00

$213.42

11/05/12

Sam Jones - $5 dues, $10 project book

$15.00

$228.42

11/05/12

Bobbie Adams - $5 dues

$5.00

$233.42

11/26/12

Pizza Land- Pizza and pop for officer training

101

$68.50

$164.92

11/26/12

MSU Publications - book order

102

$30.00

$134.92

11/31/12

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$130.92

12/06/12

Jamie Jones - $5 dues,

$5.00

$135.92

12/06/12

James family - $15 dues, $20 books

$35.00

$170.92

12/06/12

Tom Thumb - $5 dues, $10 books

$15.00

$185.92

12/06/12

Bobbie Adams - $5 books

$5.00

$190.92

12/06/12

donation to Food Bank

103

$100.00

$90.92

12/06/12

MSU Publications - book order

104

$35.00

$55.92

12/31/12

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$51.92

1/31/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$47.92

2/28/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$43.92

3/10/13

Fundraiser - Supplies for Shamrock Sales

105

$25.00

$18.92

3/31/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$14.92

4/5/13

cash donation from Mr. Brown

$25.00

$39.92

4/5/13

fundraiser - shamrock Sales

$200.00

$239.92

4/20/13

Service Project - Animal Shelter

106

$55.25

$184.67

4/30/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$180.67

5/31/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$176.67

6/30/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$172.67

7/30/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$168.67

8/10/13

Fundraiser - fair consession stand

$160.00

$328.67

8/10/13

Supplies for Recongition Night

107

$65.25

$263.42

8/31/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$259.42

9/30/13

Bank Service Charge

$4.00

$255.42

Balance at the end of the year

X

X

X

$255.42

28 Detailed Summary of Income and Expenses Report

4-H Club Name:

Beginning Balance Oct. 1,

(Year)

Income

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept.

Total

$

$

$

$

$

$

Total Income

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Expenses

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept.

Total

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Total

Detailed Summary of Income and Expenses Report

4-H Club Name:

Clover Clan 4-h Club

Beginning Balance Oct. 1,

2012 (Year)

$173.65

Income

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept.

Total

books

$30.00

$35.00

$65.00

Donations

$25.00

$25.00

Dues

$35.00

$25.00

$200.00

Fundraising - Shamrock Sales

$200

$160.00

Fundraising - fair booth

$160

$

$

Total Income

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Expenses

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept.

Total

Bank charges

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$44.00

Books

$30.00

$35.00

$65.00

Fundraising

$25.00

$25.00

Refreshments for meetings

$68.50

$65.25

$133.75

Service Projects/ Donations

$100.00

$55.25

$155.25

Misc. Treasurer’s Supplies

$5.23

$5.23

$

$

$

$

Total Expenses

$

$107.73

$139.00

$4.00

$4.00

$29.00

$59.25

$4.00

$4.00

$4.00

$69.25

$4.00

$428.23

Ending Balance Sept. 30,

2013 (Year)

$255.42

                                                                                                     

31 Clover Clan 4-H Club 10/1/11 to 09/30/12

Christopher Adams Green

Ima Clover 84-0000000

173.65 N/A

510.00

428.23

255.42 N/A

Community Bank 444 Main Street

Christopher Adams

0.00

Christopher Adams Ima Clover

Christopher Adams 10/1/2012

Marsha Samples 10/1/2012 Adam Green 10/1/2012

  • 2/10/2012
  • For Leaders and Parents
  • U nderS. Department of Agriculture and Montana State University guidelines, the MSU Extension county office is required to keep track of all transactions related to finances of 4-H clubs in their county. It is important that all 4-H clubs show the source of any money raised and how it is disbursed. The club Treasurer should use this book as a guideline to document all financial transactions and aid him/her in completing required financial reports for their club, local county Extension Office and the IRS. Parents and leaders should become familiar with the information in this section to help the club or group treasurer with documentation, required forms and financial reporting.

4-H Bank Accounts

  • If a club maintains funds for club use, it must be kept in a checking or savings account at a bank or credit union.
  • Bank accounts must not be under an individu­al’s name and social security number but rath­er the club name including the word “4-H” and an Employee Identification Number (EIN).
  • All checks must be two (2) signature checks and it is recommended that the club or group have three members as signatories. For transparency, all signatories should be from different families. All adult signatories must be certified 4-H volunteers.
  • It is recommended that an MSU Extension Agent be listed on 4-H accounts as a fourth signatory to have access to bank records.
  • The responsibility and authority of Extension Agents with regard to such 4-H funds is limited to providing oversight and ensuring that they are used to support the quality of the 4-H program.
  • An MSU Extension agent may not sign checks UNLESS there are compelling, extenuating circumstances that require this authority in unusual or extreme situations. If this is the case, the MSU Extension agent must request a waiver from this policy from the Regional Department Head and document it in writing.
  • All bank statements, receipts, cancelled checks, checkbooks, savings account books and the Montana 4-H Treasurer’s Record Book (4-H 5242), will be made available to the county Extension agent or his/her designee for a Year-end Financial Review or at any other time as requested. These documents must also be available for public inspection as per IRS regulation.
  • The Year-end Financial Summary Report and any supporting documents are due to the MSU county Extension office after the completion of the 4-H year (September 30) on a date set by the county Extension office.

Tax Exempt Status

Montana 4-H was originally granted tax-exempt status under the National 4-H Group Exemption during the 1950s. In 2011, National 4-H Headquarters decided they could no longer administer the Group Exemption for local 4-H clubs and asked State 4-H programs to assume this responsibility. Montana State University Extension, the State 4-H Center for Youth Development, and the Montana State 4-H Foundation made the decision that the Montana 4-H Foundation would apply for a new Group Exemption for all clubs, committees and councils in Montana. They also ruled that any county with the knowledge, financial assets and know-how could apply to provide Group Exemption status for all their county 4-H groups. The Montana 4-H Foundation and several counties hold their own Group Exemption status as of 2012.

  • 4-H groups under these Group Exemptions are recognized as Not-for-Profit 501(c)(3) organizations with the IRS.
  • This status allows 4-H groups to receive monetary and in-kind donations from individuals and businesses. Donors may also be able to take a tax deduction for qualifying donations. All donors should check with tax professionals for the definition of a qualifying donation.

Donations

  • Non-consumable and non-cash donations such as equipment or animals should be accepted only if the club or council is prepared to accept the long term responsibilities of ownership, including care, maintenance and insurance.
  • Clubs or groups should not feel compelled to accept non-cash gifts. The Extension agent responsible for 4-H Youth Programs should be contacted whenever the club has questions about the appropriate action with respect to accepting and managing any donation.
  • Written acknowledgment of all donations should be sent to the donor and a copy must be kept in the treasurer’s records.
  • The Internal Revenue Service requires that a specific set of written documents be completed by the donor and the donee if a cash or non-cash gift is valued at $5000 or more. A Form 990 Schedule B is required to be filed when such a gift is received. In such a case, a qualified tax attorney should be consulted.
  • Valuation of a non-cash donation is the responsibility of the donor, in consultation with his or her tax advisor and individuals qualified to appraise items of this type. It is not appropriate for a 4-H club, staff member or volunteer to place a value on items donated. Donors cannot specify the individual recipient of cash or non-cash donations.
  • A contribution earmarked by a donor for a particular individual is treated, in effect, as a gift to the designated individual and is not deductible as a charitable contribution.

Fundraising

  • 4-H clubs may choose to finance their activities through fundraising activities.
  • Soliciting funds from statewide businesses or organizations should be coordinated with the Montana 4-H Foundation.
  • Fund solicitation by clubs should be kept to a minimum and undertaken only after consultation with the county Extension agent responsible for 4-H and the county 4-H Council.

GAMES OF CHANCE, LOTTERIES, BETTING ACTIVITIES INVOLVING MONEY, AND OTHER RELATED KINDS OF ACTIVITIES DO NOT SUPPORT THE MISSION OF 4-H AND SHOULD NOT BE ENGAGED IN.

Raffles

  • 4-H clubs should be conducting raffles only where a product will be awarded to the winner. Products should be of good quality and should represent the organization well.
  • The cost of raffle tickets cannot be deducted by individuals as a charitable contribution to 4-H per IRS regulations.
  • The state of Montana does not require a non-profit organization to have a permit to conduct a raffle, but local governments may. 4-H groups wanting to hold a raffle should check with their local County Commissioners’ or Tribal Council office, where the drawing will be held, to comply with county/reservation requirements. Some officials will require an accounting of the raffles, while others will not. Be sure to ask if there are any regulations about 4-H youth (minors) selling raffle tickets.
  • Neither non-profit nor for-profit groups can solicit outside the state, but they can go across county lines.

Bingo

Bingo is considered gambling in the state of Montana and as such must be registered and approved through the State of Montana – Department of Justice: Gambling Control Division. Guidelines for this type of activity, provided by the State Gaming Office, must be followed.

FIfty-Fifty Fundraisers

  • Montana 4-H does not condone nor support 50/50 type fundraisers or raffles. These fund-raisers are not to be conducted under the auspices of 4-H nor associated with the 4-H name and emblem.
  • 4-H activities, including raffles, must have a clear educational goal or purpose and should be primarily for the benefit of 4-H members.
  • Any event sponsored for the purpose of raising funds should be limited to fundraising to support the educational mission of 4-H.
  • For any event or activity involving entry fees, raffle ticket sales, registration, etc., and where funds are collected, appropriate financial management practices should be followed. Detailed accounting for income and expenses following the steps outlined in the Montana 4-H Treasurer’s Record Book is required.
  • A financial report must be given to the county Extension agent within 60 days after the conclusion of the event. If such reports are not filed, an investigation may be conducted.
  • Funds from 4-H events may not be divided up amongst individual club members or otherwise used for personal expenses.
  • Contributions earmarked by a donor for a particular individual are treated as a gift to the designated individual and are not deductible as charitable contributions.

Employee Identification Number (EIN)

In 2006, the IRS started to require that not-for-profit groups with bank accounts have an Employer Identification Number (EIN) and file tax documentation at the end of their fiscal year. Montana 4-H policy requires all monetary assets be kept in a bank account, so any club with monetary assets will need to have an EIN.

  • When organizing, new 4-H clubs or entities need to decide on a group/club name, elect officers, and apply for a Charter through the Montana 4-H Center for Youth Development. Once a charter is granted they can decide if they will raise funds and have a bank account.
  • If a club decides that it will raise funds, it must open a checking or savings account to hold the funds.
  • To open a bank account, a 4-H group must have an Employer Identification Number (EIN) that is issued by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
  • If the club does not have a bank account and does not plan on raising funds in the name of 4-H, the club will not need an EIN.
  • Clubs must apply for an EIN through the IRS. The EIN form can either be submitted online or printed and mailed or faxed to the IRS.

Go to www.irs.gov and find the SS-4 form, “Application for Employer Identification Number.” Use the example in the Appendix on page 44 when filling out the SS-4 form. In the example, several questions have the words “leave blank” typed in the box. For those questions do not put anything in that box.

  • When filling out the SS-4 you will need to get the following information from the local county Extension office.

- The Group Exemption name and number (GEN) that the club or group will be affiliated with.

- County Extension office address.

- Date the Charter was issued

- For clubs that are reorganizing - has the group had an EIN previously, if so what is the number?

  • A group can have multiple bank accounts under the same EIN. All of the accounts under the EIN will be reported on one tax report to the IRS.

IRS Filing Requirements for 4-H Clubs and Entities

In 2006, the IRS also started requiring not-for-profit organizations, including 4-H, to file a 990 tax return. This type of return ranges from a simple 990-N (e-Postcard) to a full 990 form with back-up documentation. The form a group files is based on the group’s gross income (the amount of money raised by a group before expenses) for the year.

  • The appropriate form to file is dependent on total gross receipts. As of 2012, a 990-N (e-Postcard) is filed by groups with gross receipts of less than $50,000, with those over $50,000 filing a 990ez or 990.
  • The majority of the 4-H groups in Montana file a 990-N (e-Postcard).
  • Check with your county Extension office in October of each year for changes and directions for filing.
  • A tax professional should be consulted for advice regarding filing requirements if there are any questions.
  • A copy of evidence of filing should be kept on file in the county Extension office.

35 Handling Funds from Clubs that Disband

  • Any 4-H club or group that disbands with money left in its account must turn those funds over to the county 4-H council or county Extension office within six (6) months after disbanding. All property belonging to the club must be disbursed in the same manner.
  • Club members may request the county council use the money for a specific 4-H program. This request should be documented at the time of the disillusion of the club or group and acted on by the county 4-H Council in conjunction with the Extension Office.
  • When a 4-H unit is disbanded, the state 4-H Center must be notified by the county Extension office.

Handling Funds in Clubs That Split

  • If a club or group decides to divide, and is creating more than one recognized and properly registered club or group, the funds from the original club must be evenly disbursed, based on membership, to each club.
  • Dollars are not to be dispersed to individual members.
  • Leaving an existing club to start a new club relinquishes any claim to funds from the original club, regardless of the amount of previous fund-raising efforts provided by individual members. 4-H monies do not belong to individuals.
  • If a portion of the club membership voluntarily decides to leave an existing club and form a new club, the members of the old club may choose, by voting, to provide the new club with a portion of the funds from the original club.

Handling Complaints

  • A complaint made by 4-H members, leaders or parents of any club about the disbursement of 4-H funds must be investigated by the MSU Extension agent responsible for 4-H youth programs.
  • Issues of this nature can often be avoided if clubs have kept their books up-to-date and followed the financial policies and procedures as outlined in this document and the club Treasurer’s book.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

More specific information on 4-H financial operations and reporting requirements can be found from the following fact sheets provided by the National 4-H Headquarters.

  • The 4-H Name and Emblem
  • Tax-Exempt Status of 4-H Organizations
  • Authorized Use of the 4-H Name and Emblem
  • Livestock Sales, Auctions and Similar Events
  • IRS 4-H Livestock Sale FAQs
  • Fundraising: Private Support for the 4-H Program
  • 4-H Fundraising: Sponsorships and Promotions
  • Raffles, Lotteries, Gaming and 4-H Contests and Awards 

REFERENCES

Adapted from Ohio 4-H Treasurer’s Handbook, The Ohio State University Extension, 2003

4-H Treasurer’s Record Book, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 2005.

Treasurer’s Manual, California 4-H Youth Development program, The University of California, 2003.

Treasurer’s Handbook, Minnesota 4-H Youth Development, University of Minnesota Extension Service, 1998.

4-H Treasurer’s Records Book, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, The Texas A & M University System.

  • Treasurer’s Record Book, Mississippi 4-H Club, Mississippi State University Extension Service, Form 1019.

36 APPENDIX

Montana 4-H

Treasurer’s

Forms & Reports

4‑H CLUB ________BUDGET

(year)

A tentative budget should be set by the officers and leaders at the beginning of the 4‑H year as soon as a new club is organized. The tentative budget should be presented to the club at the first possible meeting, discussed and approved. Depending on the club’s needs, you can use this form or make your own. Remember to include a copy with your Treasurer’s Book.

Income

(List fundraising event plans, approximate date of event and estimated profit)

EVENT DATE ESTIMATED INCOME

1,_______________________________ __________ $_____________________

2._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

3._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

4._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

5._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

TOTAL INCOME $_____________________

Expenses

(Include items such as: club outings, donations to worthy causes, meeting location rental fee, recreation equipment or project materials, refreshments for parties, material for club banner, postage, Montana 4‑H Foundation donations, etc.)

NEED DATE ESTIMATED EXPENSE

1._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

2._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

3._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

4._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

5._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

6,_______________________________ __________ $_____________________

7._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

8._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

9._______________________________ __________ $_____________________

10.______________________________ __________ $_____________________

11,______________________________ __________ $_____________________

12.______________________________ __________ $_____________________

TOTAL EXPENSES $_____________________

Estimated surplus or shortfall

  • (total income minus total expenses)

Record of Club Finances

Club Name ________________________________________

Year ____________

Date

Money Received -- Name & Purpose

and

Payments Made -- Name & Purpose

Check

Number

Money

Received

(+)

Payments

Made

(-)

Balance

Balance at the beginning of the year

X

X

X

Balance at the end of the year

X

X

X

39 CHECKBOOK BALANCING/RECONCILIATION FORM

This form should be used to compare your bank statement ending balance and your checkbook ledger to make sure they are balanced (equal) each month.

OUTSTANDING DEPOSITS

STEPS TO RECONCILE/BALANCE ACCOUNT

(Not included in your statement)

1) Ending balance from your checkbook ledger

DATE

AMOUNT

2) Subtract total outstanding deposits (A)

-

3) Add total outstanding checks (B)

+

4) Subtract bank fees*

-

Total Outstanding Deposits

Total A

5) Add interest earned*

+

6) Adjusted balance (should equal bank statement)

=

OUTSTANDING CHECKS

(Not included in your statement)

Check #

Written To:

Amount

Total Outstanding Checks

Total B

* Bank fees & interest earned will show up on your bank statement and should be recorded in your checkbook ledger AFTER you balance (reconcile) your account.

                       

40 Treasurer’s Report

The Treasurer’s Report informs members of the club’s financial activity since the last meeting. Complete the Treasurer’s Report and present it to the club for each meeting.

________________________________________________________

4-H Club Name

Treasurer’s Report for ____________________________________

(Date of Meeting)

  1. Beginning account balance: $_____________________ (closing balance from previous meeting) Date of Previous Meeting: _____________________
  2. Money received:

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

$ _______ from __________________for what purpose _________________________

Total money received $__________________________

  1. Expenses:

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

$ _______ to ___________________for what purpose __________________________

Total expenses $__________________________

  1. Closing balance: $ _______________________
  2. Submitted by: _________________________________
  • (Treasurer)
  • 41 4-­‐H Fundraiser Approval Form Fill in the following information and return to the Extension Office prior to the fundraising event. This includes both club and countywide fundraisers. Please use a separate form for each fundraiser. Guidelines for 4-­‐H Fundraisers can be found on pages 33-­‐34. Club/Group Name: ____________________________ Adult Contact: Phone: (h) _________________ (c) ______________ Email: Details of Fundraising Activity: Date(s) of Activity: __________________________Location of Activity:___________________ This fundraiser plans to (check one or more of the following): o Raffle ¡ Permit needed A report must be filed within 60 days of ¡ Sample of ticket completing the fundraiser with the o Use the 4-­‐H Name Extension Office. o Use the 4-­‐H Clover/Emblem o Use 4-­‐H Facilities or Equipment Money is being raised for (be specific): Return to the Extension Office prior to the fundraiser for approval. hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh OFFICE USE ONLY hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh o The event is considered a fundraiser for the club / county. (Circle one) o The Extension Agent approves this event. Comments: __________________________________________ ________
  • 42 4-­‐H Fundraiser Report A financial report must be provided to the county Extension Agent within sixty (60) days after the conclusion of the fundraising event. If such reports are not filed, the MSU Internal Auditor will be contacted to conduct an investigation. Please use this form to report your fundraiser after the event. Has your fundraiser been approved by the County Extension Agent (circle)? YES NO If you responded NO, please attach a Fundraiser Approval Form. Club/Group Name ____________________________ Adult Contact Phone: (h) _________________ (c) ______________ Email: Details of Fundraising Activity: Date(s) of Activity: __________________________Location of Activity:___________________ Income from Fundraising Activity: (a) Expenses from Fundraising Activity: (b) Please list general expenses: Profits from Fundraising Activity: (a) minus (b) Return to the Extension Office after to the fundraiser for reporting. hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh OFFICE USE ONLY hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Date Received: Date Reviewed: Comments: __________________________________________ Extension Agent Review Signature

4-H Club Name:

Beginning Balance Oct. 1,

(Year)

Income

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept.

Total

$

$

$

$

$

$

Total Income

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Expenses

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept.

Total

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Total

                               
  • Application for Employer Identification Number Form SS-4 EIN ( Rev. January 2010) (For use by employers, corporations, partnerships, trusts, estates, churches, government agencies, Indian tribal entities, certain individuals, and others.) OMB No. 1545-0003 Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service Legal name of entity (or individual) for whom the EIN is being requested 1 Executor, administrator, trustee, “care of” name 3 Trade name of business (if different from name on line 1) 2 Mailing address (room, apt., suite no. and street, or P.O. box) 4a Street address (if different) (Do not enter a P.O. box.) 5a City, state, and ZIP code (if foreign, see instructions) 4b City, state, and ZIP code (if foreign, see instructions) 5b County and state where principal business is located 6 Name of responsible party 7a Estate (SSN of decedent) Type of entity (check only one box). If 8a is “Yes,” see the instructions for the correct box to check. 9a Partnership Plan administrator (TIN) Sole proprietor (SSN) Farmers’ cooperative Corporation (enter form number to be filed) _ Personal service corporation REMIC Church or church-controlled organization National Guard Trust (TIN of grantor) Group Exemption Number (GEN) if any _ Other nonprofit organization (specify) _ Other (specify) _ 9b If a corporation, name the state or foreign country (if applicable) where incorporated Changed type of organization (specify new type) _ Reason for applying (check only one box) 10 Purchased going business Started new business (specify type) _ Hired employees (Check the box and see line 13.) Created a trust (specify type) _ Created a pension plan (specif y type) _ Banking purpose (specify purpose) _ Other (specify) _ 12 11 Closing month of accounting year Date business started or acquired (month, day, year). See instructions. 15 First date wages or annuities were paid (month, day, year). Note. If applicant is a withholding agent, enter date income will first be paid to nonresident alien (month, day, year) _ Household Agricultural 13 Highest number of employees expected in the next 12 months (enter -0- if none). 17 Indicate principal line of merchandise sold, specific construction work done, products produced, or services provided. 18 Has the applicant entity shown on line 1 ever applied for and received an EIN? Yes No Complete this section only if you want to authorize the named individual to receive the entity’s EIN and answer questions about the completion of this form. Designee’s telephone number (include area code) Date _ Signature _ For Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notice, see separate instructions. Form SS-4 (Rev. 1-2010)

Montana 4-H Secretary's Book

Printable version of Montana 4-H Secretary's Book (PDF)

Montana 4-H Secretary’s Book

County _______________________________________________

Name of Club __________________________________________

Name of Club Secretary __________________________________

Year __________________________________________________

5327 Revised 1/2011

Montana 4-H is….

4-H is a part of the Montana State University Extension System which is a part of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and your local county government. 4-H members are youth who chose to participate in Extension sponsored educational programs which are open to all youth. The goal of Montana 4-H is to develop citizenship, life skills and educate youth and adults for living in a global and changing world by using the resources of the Land- Grant Universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Montana 4-H Educational programs are 4-H Clubs, after-school programs, 4-H camps, school enrichment, community service, events and activities for young people and adults as they work towards attaining the five Life Skills:

  • Fostering positive self concept
  • Learning Decision Making Skills and responsibility for choices
  • Developing an inquiring mind
  • Relating to self and others
  • Acquiring a concern for communities – local and global

The emblem of the 4-H program is a green fourleaf clover with a “white H” in each leaf. The four “H”’s stand for Head, Heart, Hands, and

Health and represent ways to develop the five life skills. HEAD: Learning to think, make decision, understand the ‘whys’, gain new and valuable

insights and knowledge HEART: Being concerned with the welfare of others, accepting communities, determining values and attitudes by which to live and learning how to work with others. HANDS: Learning new skills, improving skills already developed, instilling pride in works, and respect for work accomplished. HEALTH: Practicing healthful living, protecting the well-being of self and others, making constructive use of leisure time. This four-fold development is vital to every individual. All four of the “H’s” should be an important part of the goals youngsters identify as they participate in 4-H sponsored programs and educational activities.

Material adapted by:

Carol Benesh

4-H Curriculum & Outreach Specialist

Montana State University

Adapted from:

Ohio 4-H Secretary’s Handbook

Ohio State University Extension, 2003.

4-H Secretary’s Record Book

Kansas State University, 2005

Secretary, Ohio 4-H Club Officer’s

Guide

Ohio State University, 2002.

Designed by:

David Ashcraft

Montana State University Extension

The Montana State University

Extension Service is an ADA/EO/AA/

Veteran’s Preference Employer and

Provider of Educational Outreach.

Table of Contents

Montana 4-H is…................................... ii

Duties of the Secretary.......................... 1

Guidelines for Secretaries...................... 1

Club Roll.................................................. 1

Leader, Officer and Committee Lists..... 2

Meeting Minutes.................................... 2

Club Program.......................................... 4

Club Constitution and By-laws.............. 4

CHECK YOURSELF AS AN OFFICER........ 6

Congratulations! Your fellow club members have elected you to serve as secretary for the coming year. This is both an honor and a responsibility. As a 4-H club officer, you represent not only your club, but also the 4-H program throughout the state. Are you ready to assume the important office of secretary? This guide will help you understand what your role is as an officer and how to carry out your many official duties.

Duties of the Secretary

As secretary, your responsibilities include:

  • Keeping an accurate record of proceedings of all meetings and special activities.
  • Maintaining a list of all members and their attendance at meetings and activities.
  • Calling the role of members at the president’s request.
  • Completing the minutes and signing them prior to the next meeting.
  • Standing to read complete and accurate minutes at every meeting.
  • Correcting minutes as directed by the president.
  • Having the president sign the minutes after they are approved.
  • Recording the treasurer’s report and other officers’ reports in the minutes.
  • Recording committee reports in the minutes.
  • Restating motions and looking up items in the minutes at the president’s request.
  • Reminding the president of unfinished business.
  • Sharing correspondence with the club.
  • Writing letters as directed by the club.
  • Keeping a record of all officers and committees.
  • Plan for the next meeting using the Meeting Agenda form.
  • Keeping a copy of the 4-H club annual plan
  • Maintaining a current copy of the club’s program, constitution and by-laws.
  • Conducting meetings when the president and vice president are both absent.
  • Turning in the completed book at the end of the year for the club’s permanent records

Guidelines for Secretaries

Before each meeting, gather all correspondence received since the last meeting so you can present it to the club. Be sure to have an upto-date roll of members for easy attendance taking. Check the minutes of the last meeting for old business, such as tabled or postponed motions, and make a note to bring each item to the attention of the president. Use the 4-H Club Meeting Agenda form to plan for the next meeting; noting all important information.

After the meeting, write the minutes as soon as possible. Your minutes will be much more accurate and complete if you do them right away. If handwritten, be sure the final minutes are neat, legible and written in ink. If using a word processor, be sure the final minutes are in a font that will be easy to read. Sign the completed minutes. The person who is presiding when the minutes are approved will also sign. Write any necessary business letters or thank you letters on behalf of the club. After the last club meeting, give your completed notebook containing the club roll, communications, committee lists, leader list and meeting minutes to your leader. Be prepared to deliver all the secretary’s supplies to your successor.

Club Roll

It is the secretary’s responsibility to keep an accurate record of each member’s attendance. Enter the names of your club’s entire membership in your Club Roll list at the beginning of the club year. List the names alphabetically by last name. When new members join, simply add them to the bottom

of the roll. When the president asks you to take roll at the meeting, you should stay seated. Keep roll calls interesting by asking for various responses. This also lets members get to know each other a little better. Some possible answers could be:

  • favorite ice cream flavor
  • dream vacation destination
  • project work accomplished so far
  • your middle name
  • favorite cartoon character
  • what you like best about Montana
  • a hobby you have
  • a characteristic of a good leader
  • something you are thankful for
  • a safety goal

Another way to vary roll call is to have members guess the number of candies (or jelly beans, peanuts, etc.) in a jar. After roll call, the person with the closest guess claims the prize! When a member is present, mark an x in the correct box; when a member is absent, leave

he box blank.

Leader, Officer and Committee Lists

Keep a list of all club volunteer leaders including their phone number and email address. Also list all officers of the club. Having this information all together in one place will help you be able to quickly contact the leaders of the club. You may also want to copy the list for other Leaders and officers when it is complete. Keep a list of committees. These include standing committees of the club as well as any special committees formed during the year. A worksheet is available to help you organize this information.

Meeting Minutes

The minutes of the meeting are the secretary’s most important job. The official minutes of the meeting are a permanent record of the 4-H club’s activities and actions. Minutes need to be neat and easy to read. They should always be written in ink or typed. In the minutes, you will need to include the following:

  • Type of meeting (regular or special).
  • Name of your club.
  • Place and date of the meeting.
  • Name of presiding officer.
  • Time the meeting began.
  • Number of members, leaders, parents, and guests present.
  • A statement that the minutes were approved as read or corrected.
  • An accurate treasurer’s report that shows previous balance, money received since last meeting, payments made after the last meeting and current balance.
  • Reports of other officers and committees.
  • Complete motions including:
  • Name of the person making the motion.
  • Exact wording of the motion.
  • Who seconded the motion.
  • Whether it passed or failed.
  • Committee appointments and assignments of members.
  • Type of program and presenter’s name.
  • Record of all members giving demonstrations and their topics.
  • Acknowledgement of services to the club such as who provided recreation, refreshments, etc.

Two worksheets are provided for you to take notes on at the meeting. Pick the one that works best for you. Make copies of the form so you have a new one to use at each meeting. Additional forms are available online. After the meeting is over, transfer the information into a narrative summary on the Official Minutes Form (either the word processing form or the handwritten form). You will sign the bottom and the president (or presiding officer) will sign after the minutes have been approved. This document should be kept as your official club record.

Secretary’s Minutes

Mountaineers 4-H Club

January 20, XXXX

The Mountaineers 4-H Club meeting was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by President Green Thumb. The meeting was held at the Community Building.

Pledges

Pledges to the flags were led by Silver Star and Waving Hand.

Roll Call

Roll call was to name your favorite color of Jelly bean and why? There were 24 members, 3 leaders, 5 parents, and 6 guests present.

Secretary’s Minutes

Minutes of the December 18 meeting were read and approved.

Treasurer’s Report

Treasurer’s report showed a beginning balance of $543.89; income of $15 from the fair booth; and expenses of $95.20 for pizza and pop at the Christmas party; for a current balance of $463.69.

Other Officer’s Reports

Scoop Writer, news reporter, sent a news article to the Firelands Farmer and local news paper about the Christmas Party.

Committee Reports

Red Clover, chairman of the Christmas Party Committee, reported that 14 members attended the annual event. Gifts were exchanged among those present. $95.20 was spent on pizza and pop for the party. Sammie Fields moved to accept the committee report. Shawn Sand seconded the motion.

Motion passed.

Unfinished/Old Business

There was no unfinished business.

New Business

Sammie Fields moved to sell candy bars for the annual fund raiser. Sandy Helper seconded the motion. After much discussion, Larry Helper moved to refer the motion to a committee of three to be appointed by the president and report back at the next meeting. Chris Clover seconded the motion. Motion passed. President Green then appointed Sammie Fields, Silver Star and Waving Hand to the committee. The committee will meet and present their suggestions for a fund raiser at the next meeting. John Brush moved to donate $100.00 to the Fair Board to use for stone under the Cloverbud Barn. Chris Clover seconded the motion. Motion passed. Misty Rain moved to have a Valentine’s Party. Motion died for lack of second.

Advisor’s Report

Mrs. Helper borrowed project books from the Extension Office so members may look at the different project books available. Larry Helper moved to adjourn the meeting. John Brush seconded the motion. Motion passed and the meeting was adjourned.

Educational Program or Community Service Preparation

The Educational Program for the evening was members talking about the projects they took last year and what projects they might take this year. Everyone was given a Family Guide to 4-H and then looked through the project books Mrs. Helper brought to the meeting.

Recreation and/or Refreshments

The Hand family served punch and cookies. There was no recreation.

Next Meeting

The next meeting will be held at the Community Center on Feb. 20th, XXXX at 7:00pm.

Respectfully submitted,

John Anderson

Secretary

Joe Smith

President

(have president sign after being approved)

Club Program

It is important that every 4-H club prepare a program of activities at the beginning of the year. This program may be prepared by the Executive Committee (the officers), a special program committee, or any variation that works in your club. The proposed program always needs to be adopted by the club. The secretary must include in the minutes the person who moved to adopt the program of activities for the year, who seconded the motion and whether the motion passed or failed. Keep a copy of the adopted club program in the secretary’s book. A club program of activities may take on many forms. (See appendix.) The club program should include:

  • Meeting dates, times and locations
  • Special meeting topics (safety, health, achievement, etc.)
  • Special activities planned (community service, project work, field trips, etc.)
  • Demonstration dates, who is providing refreshments, etc.

Club Constitution and By-laws

Every 4-H club is required to develop a constitution and bylaws. This document reflects the organization of the club and contains any special club rules. The entire 4-H club is responsible for writing the constitution and bylaws. These documents should be reviewed by the club each year. There should be a motion, second and passing vote recorded in the minutes adopting the constitution and bylaws each year. Changes to the constitution must be approved by a 2/3 majority vote of the club. Bylaws may be changed with a standard majority vote any time throughout the year. Each member should sign a copy of the approved constitution and bylaws each year. This signifies that every member accepts and is bound by the terms included. A constitution contains the basic operating premise of the club. It will not change very often. A club constitution should include:

  • The official name of the club.
  • The objective or purpose of the club.
  • Who is eligible for membership. (It must include state 4-H guidelines and be nondiscriminatory.)
  • What officers shall be elected.
  • Rules for amendments.
  • The date of adoption and the current year of approval. Bylaws are the club’s operational rules. They may change throughout the year. Bylaws may include:
  • Order of business for a club meeting.
  • How officers are nominated and elected.
  • Duties of the officers
  • List of standing committees.
  • How special committees are set up.
  • What is expected of members.
  • Rules regarding the completion of projects.
  • Meeting attendance rules and consequences if rules are not met.
  • How bylaws may be amended.
  • How club assets will be distributed if the club disbands.

SAMPLE CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS

ARTICLE I ______________________ 4-H club shall be the name of this organization.

ARTICLE II Object: The object of this 4-H club is to aid in the development of its members through

practical research-based practices, club meetings, demonstrations, judging, tours, fairs

and other activities.

ARTICLE III Membership: Members: Youth that turn 6 years of age during the Montana 4-H year

(October 1 and September 30) and have not passed their 19th birthday during the 4-H

year are eligible for membership irrespective of race, color, creed, age, religion, national

origin, sex, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, sexual

orientation, marital status or parental status.

ARTICLE IV Officers: The officers of this club shall be president, vice president, secretary, treasurer,

reporter, and recreation leader.

ARTICLE V Leaders: The club will have _____ organizational leader(s) and as many other leaders as

necessary to serve as project and activity leaders.

ARTICLE VI Meetings: There shall be a minimum of six (6) meetings of the club held each year.

ARTICLE VII Amendments: It shall require a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular

meeting to amend this constitution.

BY-LAWS

ARTICLE I Election of Officers: Officers shall be elected by ballot at the October meeting each year.

ARTICLE II Duties of Officers:

  1. President shall preside at all meetings of the club and have in mind at all times the

best interests of the club. The president may call special meetings with the consent

of the leader.

  1. Vice President shall perform the duties of the president when the president is absent.
  2. Secretary shall keep a record of all proceedings of the club, shall act as club

correspondent in matters pertaining to the business of the club, and shall keep a

correct enrollment of all members.

  1. Treasurer shall receive and take care of all money belonging to the club, and shall

pay out at the order of the president, after club action. The treasurer shall keep an

accurate report of all receipts

and expenditures

  1. Reporter shall write a news report of each meeting and of club activities for the local

newspaper.

  1. Recreation Leader shall be responsible for the recreation period at each club meeting

and at special events.

ARTICLE III Committees: Committees standing and special will be appointed by the president as

needed.

ARTICLE IV Meetings: The regular meetings of the club shall take place on the _____ of each month.

Special meetings may be called by the president with the consent of the leader.

ARTICLE V Elections: A majority vote shall constitute an election.

ARTICLE VI Quorum: A quorum shall consist of a majority of the membership. A quorum is needed

to hold an official business meeting.

ARTICLE VII Order of Business: The order of business for regular meetings shall be as follows: Call

to order, roll call, reading and approval of minutes, reading of communication, reports

of officers, reports of committees unfinished business, new business, announcements,

adjournment of business meeting, program and recreation period.

Article VIII If a vacancy occurs during the year, members will vote on a replacement.

Article IX Amendments: These By-laws may be amended by a majority vote of the members present

at any regular meeting.

Article X Dissolution: If this club disbands, all assets, and club materials will be turned over to the

County 4-H Extension Office and/or the County 4-H Foundation.

CHECK YOURSELF AS AN OFFICER

A 4-H Group needs officers who will:

üüüServe the group best during the coming year—not ride on success

üüüWork with all members and give everyone a chance to participate

üüüShare leadership by giving others an opportunity to accept responsibility and develop their

leadership skills.

üüüBe dependable

üüüHelp to plan a program for the year that is in the best interest of all the members of the

group.

üüüWork well with other officers, committee members, leaders, and parents.

üüüTry to make the meetings worthwhile and interesting.

Rate Yourself as an officer and group Member – Check the ones that apply to you.

üüüI know that being a good leader means I need to understand myself and try to know and

understand the people with whom I work with.

üüüI know the duties and responsibilities of my office

üüüI attend meetings regularly

üüüI am willing to learn more in order to be a better officer

üüüI am on time for meetings

üüüI try to spend some time at meetings with everyone in the group during the course of

the year.

üüüI accept responsibilities willingly and enjoy doing more than just what is required of me.

üüüI work cooperatively with other officers and the leaders.

üüüI am willing to give credit to others.

üüüI encourage new members to join and do things with them at meetings to make them

feel welcome.

üüüI listen to ideas and suggestions from others.

üüüI am willing to help conduct and take part in the meeting.

üüüI try to keep irritations from becoming big problems.

üüüI am ready to try new ideas.

üüüI feel good enough about myself that I can admit that I don’t know everything.

Leadership means helping others to do things, not doing them yourself.

Montana 4-H News Reporter's Book

Printable version of Montana 4-H News Reporter's Book (PDF)

Montana 4-H News Reporter’s Book

5243 Revised 11/09

County ___________________________________________________

Name of Reporter __________________________________________

Year ________________________ Age_________________________

Name of Club _____________________________________________

Leaders Signature __________________________________________

Material adapted by:

Carol Benesh

4-H Curriculum & Outreach Specialist

Montana State University

Adapted from:

Ohio State University New Reporter

and Montana 4-H Reporter.

Designed by:

David Ashcraft

Montana State University Extension

The Montana State University

Extension Service is an ADA/EO/AA/

Veteran’s Preference Employer and

Provider of Educational Outreach.

Congratulations on being elected your 4-H club news reporter. Your club has bestowed upon you both an honor and a responsibility – and an interesting and fun job! You are taking on the job of News Reporter alias Journalist for your 4-H Club! This job will allow you to be creative, meet new people and share all the good happenings of your club!

jour·nal·ism

Pronunciation: ‘j&r-n&-”li-z&mThe collection and editing of news for presentation through the media; writing designed for publication in a newspaper or magazine; writing designed to appeal to current popular taste or public interest

— Webster Dictionary

You are being given the opportunity to raise awareness about the 4-H program in your county – the fun your 4-H club members are having, the work they are doing and the community service they are involved in. And, as a 4-H club officer, you represent your club, your county and the 4-H program

throughout Montana.

—— Table of Contents ——

Your duties are...........................................................2

Contact your local newspaper…...............................2

News story format….................................................2

From the beginning...................................................3

Get the facts and the details.....................................3

The upsidedown pyramid format.............................3

Writing club meeting reports....................................4

Photographs bring attention to the story!..............5

Tips on getting media coverage...............................5

More tips....................................................................6

Where else can you publicize 4-H?...........................6

Your Work is Important-Your Duties are…

As the club news reporter, you will:

  • Submit announcements for events planned by your club, as appropriate
  • Report to your local papers what your club does, or in some cases, report it to your club leader or county agent. In the news business you are writing a “story.”
  • Keep a notebook of all, meeting forms for articles, articles written, and include the clippings from the newspaper or any other media source you work with.

Contact your local newspaper…

Ask to speak with the staff person to whom you will be submitting your news stories (copy), and request detailed instructions on how copy is to be submitted, such as:

  • electronically – be sure to get the email address
  • hard copy – does it need to be typed or is handwritten copy acceptable? Also ask what types of photo file formats are acceptable?

News Story Format…

The first time you refer to a person, use their full name (and title if appropriate).

  • The next time you refer to a person under age 18, refer to them by their first name. The next time you refer to a person age 18 and over, refer to them by their last name.
  • Write in the third person. This means you use the words he, she, him, her, they, them – NOT the words I or you or we.
  • Use simple language. Don’t use a long word when a short word will do. Sentences should be short and easy to read. Paragraphs should contain no more than two or three sentences.

From the Beginning

You will need to write a good lead to grab the reader’s attention! The most important part of any story is the opening paragraph or two. This story beginning is called the lead. Generally, newspaper readers skim. They glance at headlines. If they see one that looks interesting, they read the start of

the story under that head. If the lead gets their attention, they may read the rest of the story. To get started decide the most important or interesting thing you have to tell the readers and use that to get started! Be sure it has all the facts! Next: Follow the Lead with the Body of the story which explains the lead and gives more detail. Follow the Inverted pyramid explained below!

Get the Facts and the Details

The 5 “W”s and 1 “H” of News: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How?

The important parts of a news story are the five W’s and the H. Explain each one and your story is written!

  • WHO is the story about?
  • WHAT is the story about?
  • WHEN will (did) it happen?
  • WHERE will (did) it happen?
  • WHY will (did) it happen?
  • HOW will (did) it happen?

And, these facts must be accurate! Check and re-check names, titles, dates, times, costs, etc.

The Upsidedown Pyramid format

The Upsidedown Pyramid format puts the facts in “news order” so that the story starts with the information that the reader needs most and works down from there.

Start with information needed most. Next, write what is second in importance. Continue with more information to complete the story!

The first paragraph should contain enough information to give a good overview of the entire story. The rest of the story explains and provides additional information. You must assume that the story might be cut due to space limitations, so ask yourself if the story is satisfactory if the editor decides to include only the first two paragraphs. if not, re-arrange it so that it does!

Writing Club Meeting Reports

  • Write club meeting reports like a news article in paragraph form -- not like a secretary’s report with bullet items.
  • Keep the article interesting and brief.
  • Avoid slang. So that all readers can become familiar, don’t use JLs – spell out Junior Leaders.
  • Begin your article (Lead) with the most important part of the meeting.

SAMPLE: Club Meeting Report

Roger Helms

Coming Up Clovers 4-H Club

555-555-5555

April 1, YYYY

The Coming Up Clovers 4-H Club voted to clean up and adopt a stretch of highway as a community

service project at their meeting held March 30 at the 4-H Town Hall.

SAMPLE: Election of Officers Report

Roger Helms

Coming Up Clovers 4-H Club

555-555-5555

March 1, YYYY

Perry Prez will serve as president of the Coming Up Clovers 4-H Club for the coming year. Perry, a 10-

year 4-H member, was elected at the February 26 meeting held at the 4-H Town Hall.

Other new officers are Vice-President Wylie Smith, Secretary Ashley Akins, Treasurer Penny Jones,

News Reporter Roger Helms, Health & Safety Leader Nicky McNeal, and Recreation Leader Jose

Mendez.

The next meeting of the Coming Up Clovers 4-H Club will be held on Thursday, March 30 at 6:00

p.m. at the 4-H Town Hall.

Photographs bring attention to the story!

The old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words is accurate! A photograph can draw the readers to the story because a picture draws the eyes and then the reader wants to know the story behind the picture. Follow these rules of thumb with pictures:

  • All persons in the photograph should be clearly identified, front to back, left to right.
  • Check and re-check the spelling of names of persons in each photograph.
  • All persons should have given permission to use their photographs.
  • Submit photographs to the newspaper in the required format (usually .jpg files) along with your article. At the bottom of the article, indicate the name of the photograph file you are submitting. Check what types of photos your newspaper requires and in what formats and size.
  • You may also need help in recognizing a good photo: first they show people doing something (not posing), good photos don’t include too many people 3 to 5 at best, they avoid distracting backgrounds, and they are often close up views of people in picture.
  • Find out how they like to receive the photo; will they accept digital photos? Be sure to have a caption. If they want them printed: Never write on the back of a photo, and you must give a caption or headline, which can be written and taped on the back.

Tips on Getting Media Coverage

It’s a local story: Contact the editor or particular reporter assigned to the “county” beat or other relevant beat. Webster assigns “beat” as regularly assigned subject or area. It is had good visual potential: Contact the news director at the local television station. Be ready to describe why it is worthy of TV coverage. Watch TV news with an eye toward what is a good visual story-- Must be told by photos better than words alone. If there is definite news: If there is definite news (not a soft human interest feature) also call the radio news director..

The quickest way to “turn off”a news staffer is to call and say you want some publicity on something.

When to call on the Phone: Calling on the phonies Okay. Just make sure you’re not calling when reporters are on a deadline. This is something you should find out about right away when you contact reporters, editors, and news directors—when is the best time to call. Pitch the story’s news value: Pitch the story in terms of its significance and news value. (Why is this community service project so much better? The fact that you painted the fence at the fair may not be news unless it has a significant impact on the use of the Fairgrounds and possibly safety of those attending the fair. Use an angle a reporter can life with: Present the idea in a way that makes the reporter want to write about it. If the reporter isn’t interested, see if you can come up with a different angel and explain how it would meet the publications’ needs. Quickly follow up with additional information the reporter would need to do the story.

Provide Background: Provide a press release or background information sheet that summarizes the key information you want to present. Put the most important facts first. Put your name and phone number, and the phone numbers of others from whom the reporter could get information. Providing background is especially important if the information is complicated and it will help the reporter be more accurate. Develop a Rapport: Get to know key reporters and editors so they’ll call you if they have a question. The way to do this is by being dependable and respectful and by demonstrating your newshound tendencies; being inquisitive and enthusiastic about people, places and things.

More Tips

  • Your story must be current. Submit your story within a few days of the event or activity.
  • Be objective. You must remain completely impartial.
  • Quotes add authority to a story. Here’s an example: “We’re really excited about this competition,” said leader Aaron Black. “It’s the highest target

we’ve ever set for ourselves”.

  • Check and re-check your story before you submit it. It is critical that the story is completely accurate, with all names and other information spelled correctly.
  • If you find that information in a story you have already submitted has changed or is not correct, call the newspaper immediately so the information can be corrected. It is important to report changes so that readers will not be inconvenienced by incorrect information.
  • After you have submitted a story, watch the newspaper closely. Once the story appears, clip it carefully and collect each one for your record book or as part of the club scrapbook.

Where else can you publicize 4-H?

Here’s some ideas to promote 4-H. Talk these over with your leader and your 4-H Agent.

  • Offer to tape radio public service announcements during National 4-H Week.
  • Offer to assist in working on the county 4-H newsletter.
  • Offer to work with your 4-H agent on producing special pages for the local newspaper.
  • Write a letter to the editor during National 4-H Week, telling how much you enjoy the 4-H program.

Parlimentary Practice for 4-H

Printable version of Parlimentary Practice for 4-H (PDF)

Parliamentary Practice for 4-H

 Feb. 2003 • 5303

Parliamentary Procedure

Parliamentary Practice Problems for Montana 4-H Clubs

Welcome and congratulations! You’re getting ready to learn more about conducting organized meetings using the oldest format in democratic society—parliamentary procedure. The rules for parliamentary procedure came about to ensure a consistent process for conducting deliberative meetings.

This guide book of parliamentary practice problems is designed to help you learn how to handle specific mo­tions and procedures. The guide can also be of assistance in preparing for Gavel Games competitions.

Acknowledgements:

Many thanks to Roger E. Regnier, former state leader, and John B. Han­na, Extension 4-H Specialist, Kansas State University Extension, from which much of this material was taken.

This material was adapted, updat­ed and expanded by Kirk A. Astroth, Montana State University, Extension 4-H Specialist, and Nick Shrauger, Gal­latin County 4-H Volunteer.

Layout and Design by Suzi Taylor, MSU Communications Services.

©2003, 2001.

To find answers to specific ques­tions, you can also visit the Robert’s Rules of Order web site at: www.robertsrules.com and visit

www.parliamentarian.org

www.parliamentaryprocedure.org

Why there is Parliamentary Procedure

by Nick Shrauger

Do you remember a time in which you joined a conversation among several people? In that group was an individual or two who seemed to do all of the talking. It was difficult, if not impossible, for you to make a statement, state your ideas or participate in anyway.

Consider what would happen if instead of joining a conversation, you were attending a meeting at which some goal or objective was to be accomplished. How would you feel if you were unable to state your view? Parliamentary procedure makes it possible for you, or anyone else to be heard. Parliamentary procedure is an organized way in which the smallest minority (even just one person) can be heard, while pre­serving the right of the majority to prevail.

Think of the difficulties of conducting busi­ness to arrive at a decision if parliamentary procedure is not used. And think of how short, productive and easy business meetings become when parliamentary procedure is used. It is im­portant for leaders and members alike to know how to conduct business meetings.

What are the rules for Parliamentary Proce­dure? One of the oldest and most popular set is Robert’s Rules of Order. It is the set of rules used by most legislative bodies.

Most of the time meetings are small groups and issues are not contentious. In these cases, only a few simple rules are needed. Often con­sensus (another method of conducting meet­ings) can be used to arrive at a decision. But if a decision is to be made on a difficult issue, it becomes necessary to strictly follow Robert’s Rules. For this reason it is important that you understand and learn to use Robert’s Rules of Order.

Suggested Process for Using Parliamentary Practice Problems

The following suggested outline would enable a club to complete all these problems over a two-year time span. The problems are listed in the approximate order in which they should be taken up by a club. You may want to spend more than one meeting on one of the problems to master it appropriately. New problems should not be taken up until preceding ones are thor­oughly mastered.

First Year

OCTOBER

General parliamentary information................................4

NOVEMBER

Constitution and bylaws.................................................................13

DECEMBER

Order of business.......................................................................................6

JANUARY

Eight steps necessary to put a question before the House...............................................................................................................6

Division of a question..........................................................................7

FEBRUARY

Amending the main motion.......................................................8

MARCH

Aids in disposing of motion—.................................................8

Table, postpone to a set time ...............................................9

APRIL

Aids in disposing of motions continued; to postpone indefinitely............................................................................9

To place in the hands of a committee...........................

MAY

Point of order

To adjourn .........................................................................................................10

JUNE

To reconsider .................................................................................................11 Appeal from decision of chair ............................................10

JULY

To take from the table ....................................................................12

AUGUST

Resolutions

Constitution and bylaws ...............................................................13

SEPTEMBER

Nominations and elections..........................................................15

Second Year

OCTOBER

Election of officers, nominations, and voting..15

NOVEMBER

The previous question ....................................................................16

DECEMBER

To reconsider and have

entered on the minutes..................................................................16

JANUARY

To withdraw a motion......................................................................18

FEBRUARY

To postpone indefinitely...............................................................18

MARCH

Objection to the consideration of the question.......19

APRIL

To refer to a committee...............................................................20

MAY

Advanced problem 1..........................................................................22

JUNE

Advanced problem 2 .......................................................................24

JULY

Advanced problem 3 ........................................................................25

AUGUST

Advanced problem 4........................................................................26

SEPTEMBER

Review......................................................................................................................28

3 Where can I find out more on...?

NOTE. For quick reference, see “Rules for Handling Motions” which appears on pp. 28-29.

Introduce business

Steps necessary to put a question before the House ..........................................................................................................................6

Conduct elections

Nominations, voting...............................................................................15

Defer a matter or kill it

Postpone indefinitely.................................................................18, 25

Table a motion......................................................................................8, 22

Defer action

Postpone to a set time ....................................................................9

Order of business .....................................................................................6

Table ...................................................................................................................8, 22

Divide a complex question

Reconsider and enter on minutes..................................16

Division of a question..........................................................................7

Change or modify

Amend.....................................................................................................8, 22, 25

Let a few attend to a matter

Refer to a committee........................................................................20

Fix a time to attend to a matter

Postpone to a set time......................................................................9

Stop debate and order an immediate vote

Previous question....................................................................................16

Suppress a question

Object to consideration.........................................................19, 22

Postpone indefinitely.................................................................18, 25

Table.....................................................................................................................8, 22

Do something contrary to bylaws or rules

Suspend the rules ...................................................................................12

Prevent a motion from being voted on

Withdraw a motion .............................................................................18

Consider a motion a second time

Take from table............................................................................................12

Reconsider........................................................................................11, 22, 26

Rescind ....................................................................................................................21

Prevent a vote from being final

Move a reconsideration and have motion en­tered on minutes.......................................................................................16

Object to a decision of the Chair or relieve the Chair from responsibility of a decision

Appeal from the decision of the Chair...................10

Ask a question or make a point of order

Question of privilege.................................................................10, 26

Annul some action

Rescind......................................................................................................................21

Prepare a resolution

Form.............................................................................................................................14

Dismiss a meeting

Adjourn....................................................................................................................10

Contest Preamble...................................................................................30

Gavel Games

Scorecard........................................................................................32-33

Gavel Games Rules....................................................................34

Approved list of motions..................................................35

Sample Written Tests..............................................................36-38

TERMS

The House—the club, group or organization.

The Chair—the presiding officer.

Pending—issues or questions before the House.

Majority—more than half the votes cast.

Take precedence over—override and become the last pending question.

Quorum—the number allowed to conduct busi­ness.

Ex officio—meaning “by virtue of office.” Usually a non-voting member.

Before the House—being considered by the group.

Session—in conventions, the several meetings in which one continu­ous routine of business is transacted. In societ­ies, the regular meeting together with its ad­journed meetings, or a special meeting with its adjourned meetings.

Common Questions and Answers

Question. In parliamentary usage, what is the first thing to learn?

Answer. To rise and address the Chair to obtain the floor.

  1. How do you address the Chair?
  2. Madam or Mr. President, or if not the president, Madam or Mr. Chairman or by his special title if s/he has one.
  3. How does the Chair recognize a member and assign him/her the floor?
  4. By calling his/her name. In a 4-H group this is usually the first name of the person.
  5. What is the advantage in obtaining the floor?
  6. The Chair is compelled to defend a member in his right to the floor and to state his motion or opinions.
  7. May a member assigned the floor be interrupted?
  8. Yes, but only if his procedure is out of order.
  9. What is the correct form of a main motion?
  10. “I move that . . .” Do not say, “I move you . . .” or “I make a motion . . .”
  11. What must follow most motions (all main motions)?
  12. A second (another endorsement of the item of business).
  13. Should one rise to second a motion?
  14. No. In large bodies, however, it may be best to rise and without waiting for recognition, say, “Mr. or Madam Presi­dent, I second the motion.”
  15. What is a quorum?
  16. The number of eligible voting members al­lowed to conduct business.
  17. Should it be a majority or minority?
  18. A minority, usually.
  19. May important business be transacted by a minority quorum?
  20. Yes, but it may not be best.
  21. How long may a member of an ordi­nary society talk?
  22. Not longer than 10 minutes nor more than twice to a question and not the second time until all who wish have spoken once.
  23. What should follow the second?
  24. The Chair must state the motion. He should not say, “You have heard the motion.” The Chair may require any motion to be written.
  25. Why state the motion?
  26. Until stated, it does not become the prop­erty of the House and may not be debated, amended, or otherwise acted upon.
  27. How does the Chair state a principal motion?
  28. “It has been moved and seconded that the society (assembly, club, organization, or con­vention) . . .”
  29. What is a main or principal motion?
  30. One that introduces business.
  31. Are all main motions debatable?
  32. Yes.
  33. What should the Chair say after stat­ing the motion?
  34. “Is there any discussion?”
  35. Can members be compelled to vote?
  36. Only in bodies having great power over the members, as in Congress. This is done by ordering the yeas and nays.
  37. Should the Chair stand to state a ques­tion?
  38. Yes, she should stand also to put the ques­tion to vote.
  39. When does the Chair take the vote?
  40. When the organization or club, not some individuals, is ready for it.
  41. What is the best form in taking a vote by acclamation?
  42. All in favor say aye; opposed, no. This is called putting the question. Speak both aye and no distinctly.
  43. May the Chair vote?
  44. Yes, as shown under duties of the presiding officer.

Order of Business

  1. Call to order
  2. Opening exercises—pledge, motto, etc.
  3. Reading of minutes, corrections if needed, approval of minutes
  4. Communications not requiring action (let­ters of appreciation, etc.)
  5. Reports of officers
  6. Reports of standing and special committees
  7. Unfinished business
  • Motions postponed at the last meeting
  • Motions laid on the table at the last meet­ing
  1. New business as introduced
  2. Program
  3. Announcements and Notices
  4. Adjournment

Parliamentary Practice Problems

As you work in your club on learn­ing parliamentary procedure, you may want to use these practice problems. Have a leader (teen or adult) who will explain the problem. The Leader and her helpers should plan their demon­stration before the meeting.

Eight Steps Necessary to Put a Question Before the House

Leader. The eight steps necessary to put a question before the House are:

  1. A member rises and addresses the Chair.
  2. The member is recognized by the Chair.
  3. The member makes the motion.
  4. Another member seconds the mo­tion.
  5. President states the motion to the group.
  6. President calls for discussion.
  7. President takes the vote.
  8. President states the result—those for, and those against the motion.

Demonstration

With the aid of three members, we will demonstrate the correct motion procedure.

First Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. John.

First Helper. I move that the Cotton­wood 4-H Club conduct a drive to increase our club membership.

President. Is there a second to this mo­tion? (Ask for a second when a motion is not promptly seconded.)

Second Helper. (Do not stand.) I second the motion.

President. The motion before the House is that the Cottonwood 4-H Club conduct a drive to increase our club membership. Is there any discussion?

First Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. John.

7 First Helper. I believe it is necessary to make a special effort to see the boys and girls of this community and explain the good things they will receive as 4-H Club members.

Third Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Howard.

Third Helper. We have enough members in our club. An increase in numbers of members will bring in boys and girls not especially interested and will make more work for the leaders.

President. Is there any more discussion? The motion is that the Cottonwood 4-H Club conduct a drive to increase our club membership. All in favor say aye; all opposed, no.

Second Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Julie.

Second Helper. I call for a division.

Note: This refers to division of the house and is done when a member is not satisfied with the count when the vote has been taken by voice or hand and wishes the vote to be taken again. The President must take an­other vote.

President. (A division of the house having been called for, take a standing vote.) The motion is that the Cottonwood 4-H Club conduct a drive to increase our club membership. All in favor, stand. Be seated. All opposed, stand. Be seated. Fifteen in favor; twelve opposed. The Cottonwood 4-H Club will conduct a drive to increase the mem­bership.

Division of the Question

Leader. The object of the divi­sion of the question is to avoid voting on too many independent questions at one time. If a motion when made consists of two or more independent

items of business, connected by con­junctions, it may be best to consider them separately as the club may wish to adopt only part of them. The re­quest for the division of the motion may be made by an individual, or it may be by motion. If an individual makes the request, she would say, “I call for a division of the motion.”

If the request is in the form of a motion:

  • it is not debatable
  • it may be amended
  • it requires a majority vote
  • it may not be reconsidered.

President. The motion before the club is that the Lucky Leaf 4-H Club accept William Smith as a member and hold a picnic next Saturday afternoon, the boys to supply the food and the girls the transportation, and that the picnic be held at John’s at exactly 5:30 p. m.

First Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Paul.

First Helper. I request a division of the question.

President. The Secretary will divide the question into independent propositions for action.

NOTE. The original motion to adopt now applies to each part.

Secretary. The motion before the House is that the Lucky Leaf 4-H Club accept William Smith as a member.

First Helper. I second the motion.

President. Is there any discussion?

Second Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Jill.

consists of two or more independent items of business, connected by con­junctions, it may be best to consider them separately as the club may wish to adopt only part of them. The re­quest for the division of the motion may be made by an individual, or it may be by motion. If an individual makes the request, she would say, “I call for a division of the motion.”

If the request is in the form of a motion:

  • it is not debatable
  • it may be amended
  • it requires a majority vote
  • it may not be reconsidered.

President. The motion before the club is that the Lucky Leaf 4-H Club accept William Smith as a member and hold a picnic next Saturday afternoon, the boys to supply the food and the girls the transportation, and that the picnic be held at John’s at exactly 5:30 p. m.

First Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Paul.

First Helper. I request a division of the question.

President. The Secretary will divide the question into independent propositions for action.

NOTE. The original motion to adopt now applies to each part.

Secretary. The motion before the House is that the Lucky Leaf 4-H Club accept William Smith as a member.

First Helper. I second the motion.

President. Is there any discussion?

Second Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Jill.8

Second Helper. William is a great kid. He will do his best at everything, and I think the club will profit greatly by having him as a member.

President. Is there any further discus­sion? (Pause.) If not, all in favor of the motion to accept William Smith as a member, stand. Opposed, stand. The vote is favorable and the club accepts William Smith as a member.

NOTE. The secretary then reads the next part and each part is consid­ered as a distinct motion. The sepa­rate parts may be amended. See the next problem for this procedure.

Amending the Main Motion

Leader. The object of amend­ing the main motion is to change it and make it more satisfactory to the group.

  • It requires a second.
  • It is debatable, debate being con­fined to the amendment.
  • It may be amended.
  • It requires a majority vote. It may be reconsidered.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the Sunshine 4-H Club buy a used CD player. Is there any discus­sion?

Second Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. Francis.

Second Helper. I move to amend the motion by striking out the word “used” and inserting the word “new.”

First Helper. I second the amendment.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded to amend the motion by striking out the word “used” and inserting the

First Helper. (Stand.) I want the club to have a new machine. A used one is not reliable.

President. Is there any more discussion? All in favor of the amendment, stand; opposed, stand. The amendment is car­ried. The motion now before the club is that the Sunshine 4-H Club buy a NEW CD player. Is there any discus­sion? (Pause.) All in favor of the mo­tion, stand; opposed, stand. The motion is carried. The Sunshine 4-H Club will buy a new CD player.

Leader. (Discuss this procedure fully.) An amendment may be stated as follows: I move to amend by—

  • Inserting the word “_____” before the word “_____”
  • Striking out the word “_____”
  • Striking out the word “_____” and inserting “_____”
  • Substituting the motion “_____” for motion “_____”

If the amendment carries, the main motion becomes the motion as amended. If lost, the main motion is unaffected.

To Lay on the Table

Leader. The object of the mo­tion “to lay on the table” is to lay aside temporarily the pending busi­ness. Making this motion allows the group to put aside a pending question temporarily when something else of immediate urgency has arisen. This motion is commonly misused in many groups in place of the motion to Post­pone Indefinitely or to Postpone to a Certain Time. This motion violates the rights of the minority if it is used for any other purpose that stated above. This motion is “out of order” if the intent is to kill or avoid dealing with a question before the group. For these reasons:

9 • It is not debatable and requires a second.

  • It may not be amended.
  • It requires a majority vote.
  • It may not be reconsidered.

President. The motion before the club is that the Willing Workers 4-H Club buy a dog for use as a mascot. (After heated discussion by two or three helpers, continue.)

First Helper. Mr. President.

President. Helen.

First Helper. I move that the motion be laid on the table.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the motion be laid on the table. (Take vote.)

Leader. (Discuss this parliamentary problem fully and point out that a question tabled and not taken from the table at the same or the follow­ing meeting is lost. Also explain that “tabling” should seldom or never be used by a minority in an effort to defeat a proposition (refer to notes above). Refer to the list of motions that may not be tabled on page 8 and 9. )

To Postpone Indefinitely and Postpone to a Certain Time

Leader. The object of postpon­ing indefinitely is to defer action on a motion. Its adoption kills the main motion (for the duration of the ses­sion) and avoids a direct vote on the question. It is useful in disposing of a badly chosen main motion that can­not be either adopted or expressly rejected without possible undesir­able consequences. This motion takes precedence over nothing except the main question and is the lowest-rank­ing subsidiary motion.

  • It requires a second and is debat­able.
  • It cannot be amended.
  • It may be reconsidered.
  • It is out of order when another has the floor.
  • It requires a majority vote.

To postpone to a definite time, however, can be made to put off ac­tion on a motion until a more conve­nient time. This motion can be moved regardless of how much debate has already occurred. A question may be postponed either so that it may be considered at another time or be­cause debate has shown reasons for holding off a decision until later.

  • It requires a second and is debat­able.
  • It is amendable as to the time to which the main motion is to be postponed.
  • It may be reconsidered.
  • It is out of order when another has the floor.
  • It requires a majority vote.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the Happy Hustlers 4-H Club hold their annual picnic at Mr. Smith’s home on June 8. Are there any remarks?

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

First Helper. Mr. Smith is sick, so I do not think it advisable to hold a picnic at his home on June 8; therefore, I move to postpone the motion until our regular meeting next month.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. The motion before the club is that we postpone the motion that the Happy Hustlers 4-H Club hold their annual picnic at Mr. Smith’s home on June 8.

Note: This motion is debatable to a limited extent. When passed it becomes unfinished business for the next meeting.

President. (Take the vote.)

Leader. (Point out that a ques­tion may not be postponed to a time beyond the next regular meeting. A motion may not be taken up before the time to which it was postponed except by reconsideration, suspension of the rules, or general consent.)

Point of Order, Adjournment

Leader. The purpose of raising a point of order is to enforce the rules. A person would make this motion to raise a question of propriety in how business is being conducted or if the rules are being violated.

  • It does not require a second.
  • It is not debatable, except the Chair may seek the advice of the club.
  • It may not be amended.
  • It requires a majority vote when submitted to the club.
  • It may not be reconsidered.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Joanne.

First Helper. I move we adjourn.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Wilbur.

Third Helper. I cannot see the reason for adjournment at this time. Our business is only half finished.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

First Helper. I rise

President. Please state your point.

First Helper. The motion to adjourn is not debatable and this motion before the club must be voted upon immedi­ately.

President. The point is well taken. It has been moved and seconded that the Galata 4-H Club adjourn. All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. The Galata 4-H Club is adjourned.

Appeal From the Decision of the Chair

Leader. By electing a presiding officer, a group delegates to him or her the authority and duty to make necessary rulings on questions of parliamentary procedure. But any two members have the right to appeal from his decision on such a question.

If the Chair rules unfavorably on a point of order, an appeal may be made from the decision of the Chair if at least two members (one who makes the motion, the other who seconds it) still feels that he is correct. Without waiting to be recognized by the Chairman, the member rises as soon as the decision is made, even though another member has the floor.

  • It is debatable.
  • It cannot be used on rulings about which there can be only one pos­sible decision.
  • It must be made at the time of the ruling in question.
  • It must be seconded.
  • It cannot be amended.
  • It can be reconsidered.

First Helper. Mr. President, I appeal from the decision of the Chair. (The appeal must be seconded.)

Second Helper. I second the appeal.

President. (State clearly the question at issue and reasons for the decision if 11 necessary.) The question is, “Shall the decision of the Chair be upheld as the judgment of this club?” Those in favor say aye; those opposed, no. The ayes have it and the decision of the Chair is upheld, or, the nays have it and the decision of the Chair is reversed.

Motion to Reconsider

Leader. This motion is a uniquely American motion and enables a ma­jority in a group—within a limited time and without notice—to bring back for further consideration a motion that has already been voted upon. The goal of a motion to reconsider is to bring an item of business back before the group for discussion and another vote. The purpose of reconsidering a vote is to permit correction of hasty, ill-advised, or erroneous action, or to take into account added information or a changed situation that has de­veloped since the original vote on the motion.

  • It requires a second.
  • It is debatable if the motion to be reconsidered is debatable.
  • It may not be amended.
  • It requires a majority vote.
  • It must be introduced by a member who voted on the winning side.
  • It may not be reconsidered.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Tom.

First Helper. I move that the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club charge each member dues of $5.00 for this year.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club charge each member dues of $5.00 for First Helper. (Discuss the motion.)

President. The motion before the club is that the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club charge each member dues of $5.00 for this year. All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. Count the vote. Motion carried.

Second Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Bobbi.

Second Helper. I move to reconsider the vote taken on the last motion.

President. Did you cast your vote on the side receiving the most votes?

Second Helper. I did.

President. Since you voted on the pre­vailing side, it is proper for you to make the motion. The motion before the House is to reconsider the mo­tion that the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club charge each member dues of $5.00 for the club year. Do I hear a second?

Third Helper. I second the motion.

President. The motion is to reconsider the motion that the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club charge each member dues of $5.00 for the club year. Is there any discussion?

Second Helper. (Discuss reasons for wishing to reconsider.)

NOTE: A simple majority is required to reconsider a motion, regardless of the vote necessary to adopt the motion reconsidered.

President. All in favor of reconsidering the vote on the motion say aye; those opposed, no. The motion to reconsider is carried; therefore the motion that each member pay dues of $5.00 this year is open for discussion. Will the Secretary please read the motion.

To Take From the Table

Leader. To take from the table is to bring the question before the club again.

  • It requires a second. It is not debat­able.
  • It requires a majority vote.
  • It cannot be amended.
  • It cannot be reconsidered.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Cathy.

First Helper. I move to take from the table the motion that the Full-of-Fun 4-H Club buy a dog for a mascot.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. The motion before the club is that we take from the table the mo­tion that the Full-of-Fun 4-H Club buy a dog for a mascot. All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. In favor, 20; opposed, 10. Since the motion to take from the table is carried, the motion before the club now is that the Full-of-Fun 4-H Club buy a dog for a mascot. Is there any discussion?

First Helper. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. John.

John. (Discuss the motion.)

President. Is there any discussion? (Pause.) The motion before the club is that the Full-of-Fun 4-H Club buy a dog for a mascot. All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. In favor, 5; opposed, 25. The motion is defeated.

Leader. If the motion to take from the table is defeated, it can be put before the same meeting after some other business has been transacted. A question laid on the table must be taken up and disposed of during the next regular meeting; otherwise the motion dies. If the motion to take from the table carries, the original motion comes back to the club in the form in which it was tabled. The original motion may be debated upon and then put before the House in the regular motion procedure and either passed or voted down.

To Suspend the Rules

Leader. The object of suspend­ing rules is to allow the club to take action that is prohibited by the rules. The rules may be suspended by general consent, but if one member objects, a motion must be made and passed by a two-thirds vote.

  • A motion to suspend the rules re­quires a second.
  • It is not debatable.
  • It may not be amended.
  • It requires a two-thirds vote.
  • It may not be reconsidered.

The rules are suspended for a single purpose, as the motion states, and no other business may be trans­acted under the one suspension.

After the motion to suspend the rules has carried, the member who made the motion has the first right to the floor to make a motion or to discuss it.

The following rules may be sus­pended:

  • To adopt a question without debate.
  • To take a question from the table when the motion to do so is not in order (such as when someone has the floor).
  • To take up a question before the time to which it has been post­poned.
  • To make an order of the day a “spe­cial order,” which means that it is made with the stipulation that any rules interfering with its consider­ation at a specific time will be sus­pended.
  • To take action contrary to standing rules (such as when the meetings are held, time at which meetings will begin). Standing rules are not bylaws but adopted individually and relate to the administration of a group.

A motion to initiate Tom Brown was laid on the table until the next regular meeting. I wish to take this motion off the table before the scheduled time.

John. (Stand.) Mr. President.

President. John.

John. I move that the rules be suspend­ed in order that the motion that the club initiateTom Brown be voted on immediately.

Pete. I second the motion.

President. The motion before the club is to suspend the rules in order that the motion to initiate Tom Brown be voted on immediately. All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. Two thirds of those present having voted in favor of the motion, it is carried. Now the mo­tion before the club is to initiate Tom Brown. All in favor say aye; opposed, no.

Leader. (Discuss the purpose and use of this procedure.) The following items cannot be suspended:

  1. The Constitution can never be sus­pended, nor can the Bylaws, unless suspension of the latter is spe­cifically provided for in one of the Bylaws.
  2. No rule protecting absentees can be suspended, nor can a rule requiring that a vote be taken by ballot be suspended in order to hasten mat­ters.
  3. Nothing that requires previous notice and a two-thirds vote for its amendment can be suspended by less than a two-thirds vote.
  4. No rule can be suspended when the negative vote is as large as the minority protected by the rule.

Quorum

After the secretary calls the roll, the president is notified whether or not a quorum is present. If a quorum is not present, the meeting is ad­journed or prevented from transact­ing official business.

If during an official meeting enough people leave so that a quo­rum is not present, official business can be transacted. The only way to prevent official business from being transacted under the above condi­tions is to move for a new roll call. If, after the new roll call, it is found there is not a quorum, the meeting is ad­journed.

Constitution and Bylaws

The Constitution usually contains six articles, divided into sections. It sets forth the name and purpose of the organization and determines the membership. It establishes the offices, the method of election, the time of meeting, and the way to amend the Constitution.

See the sample Constitution in the Montana 4-H Club Secretary’s Record Book (2FM045S). Study it for points mentioned above.

Permanent changes require previ­ous notice to members and a two-thirds vote. Read and submit any amendment desired at the regular business meeting preceding the one at which it will be voted on.

The Bylaws contain details of organization, such as points relating to membership (honorary and associate), 14 quorum, time of meeting, nature of program, list of officers, duties of officers, committees, dues, if any, and amendments. An example of club bylaws is also found in the Montana 4-H Club Secretary’s Record Book (2FM045S).

Resolutions

Every resolution should be in writ­ing. A resolution is always a main mo­tion. A resolution always begins with the word “Resolved.” When a member wishes to present a resolution after obtaining the floor, he says, “I move the adoption of the following resolu­tion.”

Reasons for the resolution, if needed, are usually stated in a pre­amble. Each clause of the preamble constitutes a paragraph beginning with “Whereas.” The preamble is al­ways amended last, as changes in the resolution may require changes in the preamble.

The preamble should never con­tain a period but each paragraph should close with a comma or semi­colon, followed by “and,” except the last paragraph which should close with the word “therefore’’ or “there­fore be it resolved. . .”

Sample Resolution

Whereas, we consider the 4-H Club the best organization for all boys and girls; and

Whereas, the membership is not large enough in this community; therefore

Resolved: That it is the opinion of this club that ample opportunity be given for all boys and girls, as well as the parents, in this community to learn about opportunities in the 4-H Club.

Second Year’s Program

15 Election of Officers—Nominations—Voting

Nominations may be made from the floor by members, by a nominat­ing committee, or by ballot. A motion provides the method. Constitutions or Bylaws usually specify conditions relating to nominations.

If nominations have been made by the nominating committee, the presid­ing officer should ask if there are any other nominations before proceeding to an election. If there is no response, he declares the nominations closed. In large clubs, it is customary to make a motion to close nominations, but until a reasonable time has been given, this motion is not in order. Typically, the president asks for nominations three times before declaring nominations closed.

  • The motion to close nominations requires a second.
  • it cannot be debated
  • it requires a two thirds vote as it deprives members of one of their rights.
  • If it is desired to reopen nomina­tions, it may be done by a majority vote. This motion is undebatable.

Nominations need not be seconded

Officers may be elected one at a time or all at one time. If the Bylaws prescribe the method, it must be fol­lowed. Electing officers all at one time saves time, but has a serious objection when there is more than one nominee for each office; those not elected for one office cannot be nominated for any other. In small groups it is usually better to elect one officer at a time.

The vote is taken on nominees in the order in which they were nomi­nated.

Nominations—Voting

The nominations are announced by the presiding officer and usually the vote is taken by ballot.

The method of voting may be done according to the wishes of the organization unless the Bylaws specify the method to be followed.

The presiding officer appoints the tellers to collect the ballots and al­ways asks if all members have voted before she directs the count to be made.

Even if there is only one nominee for each office and none is added from the floor, the vote is taken on each office. It is not in order to take a single vote on the group at one time.

The presiding officer always has the privilege to vote by ballot and should vote at the same time as other members. In case of a tie when the vote is taken by show of hands or standing vote, she may vote to break the tie. In no case is he allowed to vote twice—first to make a tie and then to break it.

While it is the duty for every member to vote, a member cannot be compelled to do so unless the Bylaws so state.

In Congress where the public wish­es to know how the members voted, the vote is taken by roll call. The presiding officer says: “As many as are in favor of the adoption of this reso­lution will, as their names are called, answer yes; opposed, answer no.”

Parliamentary Practice Problems

16 The Previous Question

Leader. To stop debate and order an immediate vote on a question, cor­rect procedure is to say, “I move the previous question.” This motion, when seconded and carried by a two-thirds vote, forces an immediate vote.

  • It requires a second.
  • It is not debatable.
  • It may not be amended.
  • It requires a two-thirds vote to carry.
  • It may be reconsidered.

Many club members are under the impression that a motion can be brought to vote when someone in the group calls “Question.” Calling “Ques­tion” does not bring the motion to vote nor does it stop discussion.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Sam.

First Helper. I move that the Silver Creek 4-H Club increase its member­ship to 100 for the next year.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Debbie.

Third Helper. I am not in favor of making a wholesale membership drive. Quality is more important than quantity. It is a good idea to increase our membership, and I think we can, but I do not like the idea of a set number.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Sam.

First Helper. We will never get any place unless goals are set. Just because a definite number has been set, there is no reason we need to sacrifice quality. I think Debbie has the wrong viewpoint on this issue.

Second Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Everett.

Second Helper. I move the previous question.

First Helper. I second the motion.

President. The previous question has been moved and seconded on the mo­tion that the Silver Creek 4-H Club increase its membership to 100 for the next year. All in favor of ordering the previous question on the stated motion, stand; opposed, stand. As two-thirds have voted in favor of the previous question. It is carried.

The motion before the club is that the Silver Creek 4-H Club increase its membership to 100 for the next year. All in favor, rise; opposed, rise. The motion is carried.

Note: In this motion only the usual majority vote is required.

Leader. (Impress the group with the importance of the motion and the need of cooperation to bring about the desired results.)

To Reconsider and Have Entered on the Minutes

Leader. The procedure to re­consider and have entered on the minutes is used when it is desired to prevent the action on the main mo­tion from becoming final until another meeting or another day. It is to pre­vent a temporary and unrepresenta­tive majority from carrying out an action that it is believed the majority will not approve. This is needed in large societies with frequent meetings and small quorums when the atten­dance in many cases does not exceed 10% of the membership. As the mo­tion to reconsider and have entered on the minutes may be made only by one who voted on the winning side, a member desiring to make the motion should vote with the majority even though opposed to its action, or if he has already voted with the losing side, he may, before the result is an­nounced, change his vote.

Having the motion placed on the minutes gives those who are opposed to the motion a chance to get a large number of their supporters in atten­dance at the next meeting. It requires a majority vote even when reconsid­ering a motion that required a two-thirds vote.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Walter.

First Helper. I move that the Busy Bees 4-H Club hold a picnic May 3.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the Busy Bees 4-H Club hold a picnic May 3. Is there any dis­cussion?

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Eugene.

Third Helper. It is too early to have pic­nics. The weather at that time is usu­ally unfavorable and will prevent having a real picnic program.

Second Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Bill.

Fourth Helper. There is just a small number present, and I feel an activity such as a picnic should not be decided this evening.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Walter.

First Helper. If the other members do not attend meetings they cannot expect to have much to say about the business of the club. I want a picnic regardless of what the absent mem­bers think about it.

Fourth Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Bill.

Fourth Helper. It is an injustice to the absent members.

President. Is there any more discussion? Those in favor of the motion, stand; opposed, stand. Motion carried.

Fourth Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Bill.

Fourth Helper. I move to reconsider the motion and have it entered on the minutes.

Third Helper. I second the motion.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Walter.

First Helper. I rise to a point of order.

President. State your point.

First Helper. Did Bill cast his vote on the losing side?

Fourth Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Bill.

Fourth Helper. I cast my vote on the winning side. President. Bill is in order. The question is to reconsider and have entered on the minutes the motion that the Busy Bees 4-H Club hold a picnic May 3. Is there any discussion? All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. Motion carried. The question will be entered on the minutes to be reconsidered at the next meet­ing.

Leader. (Discuss the importance of the motion and what future action should be taken.)

To Withdraw a Motion

Leader. The object of withdrawing a motion is to prevent the vote and keep the motion off the records.

  • It does not require a second.
  • It is not debatable and cannot be amended.
  • It requires a majority vote.

Before a motion has been stated by the Chair, its maker may withdraw or change it as suggested. If changed, the second may be withdrawn. The President can offer help to younger members to improve their motions before restating the motion.

After a motion has been stated, it belongs to the assembly. It may then be withdrawn or changed only if there is no objection or if the assem­bly, by a majority vote, permits it. Any motion may be withdrawn.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Mary.

First Helper. I move that the Jolly Jays 4-H Club charge dues of $3.00 for the coming year.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the Jolly Jays 4-H Club charge dues of $3.00 for the coming year. First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Mary.

First Helper. I wish to withdraw my mo­tion.

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Harry.

Third Helper. I object.

President. There is an objection to with­drawing the motion. It shall be put to the vote of the club. All in favor of granting the privilege of withdrawing the motion, stand; opposed, stand. The majority is in favor and the privilege is granted.

Leader. (Make it clear that a mo­tion and all points connected with it may be withdrawn any time before voting on the question is begun.)

To Postpone Indefinitely

Leader. The object of postponing a motion indefinitely is to reject the main motion when the strength of the vote for it is uncertain, and the op­posing side wishes to find this out. It also gives a member another chance to talk after he has exhausted his right to debate.

  • It requires a second.
  • It requires a majority vote.

If the motion to postpone is lost, it may not be renewed or reconsidered, and the main motion comes back to its original form and can be amended and have all other privileges of a main motion. If the postponement is car­ried, the main motion is rejected for the present meeting unless the vote is reconsidered during the present or next business session. First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Harold.

First Helper. I move that the Lucky Leaf 4-H Club hold a skating party Friday evening.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Vernon.

Third Helper. I believe it is a good idea to hold a skating party.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Harold.

First Helper. A social time once in a while is necessary for the life of the club, so I hope that everyone will vote for it.

Fourth Helper. (Rise.) I am not in favor of the skating party Friday evening because I will be unable to attend; therefore, Mr. President, I move to postpone the question indefinitely.

Fifth Helper. I second the motion.

President. The motion before the club is to postpone indefinitely the motion that the club hold a skating party Fri­day evening. Is there any discussion?

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Harold.

First Helper. I cannot understand why one member should be selfish enough to want the party postponed because he cannot be there.

Fourth Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

Fourth Helper. I do not wish it under­stood that it is from a selfish view­point that I wish to have the party postponed, but I think others here feel the same way about it but are cautious about discussing it.

President. All in favor of postponing indefinitely the motion that the club hold a skating party, stand; opposed, stand. Four in favor; six opposed

The motion to postpone indefinitely is defeated. The motion before the club is that we hold a skating party Friday evening. Is there any discussion?

Second Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Tom.

Second Helper. I believe that arrange­ments can be made whereby every member can be present.

President. All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. The motion is carried. We will hold the skating party.

Leader. (Discuss the motion and its importance to the club.)

Objection to the Consideration of the Question

Leader. The purpose of an objec­tion to the consideration of the ques­tion is to avoid questions unprofitable and irrelevant.

  • It does not require a second. It is not debatable.
  • It may not be amended.
  • It requires a two-thirds negative vote. It may be reconsidered.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Tom.

First Helper. I move that the Happy Hustlers 4-H Club invite the Busy Bee 4-H Club to combine into one club for the next year. 20 Second Helper. I second the motion.

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. James.

Third Helper. I object to the consider­ation of the motion.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Tom.

First Helper. I rise to a point of order.

President. State your point.

First Helper. There is a motion before the House.

President. Tom, your point is not well taken. The objection to the consider­ation is in order. This objection may be raised before there is any debate on the main motion and may be made when another has the floor. It cannot be de­bated or amended and must be put to a vote immediately. The consideration of the question has been objected to. All in favor of considering the question, stand; opposed, stand.

There being two-thirds opposed, the main motion will not be considered.

NOTE. If the motion had passed, the President would announce, “There being less than two-thirds opposed, the objection is not sustained and the question is before the club.”

Leader. (Explain that it was decid­ed by a two-thirds negative vote not to consider the main motion; there­fore, the whole matter is dismissed for the present session. The same mo­tion may be introduced at any other meeting. The object of this motion is to avoid any item of business that may be unprofitable or cause dissen­sion in the club. This objection cannot be applied to amendments, bylaws, or reports of committees.)

To Refer to a Committee

Leader. The object of referring to a committee is to commit or recom­mend to a standing or special com­mittee a question that may be more carefully investigated and put into better shape for the group to con­sider than can be done in the group itself.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Bob.

First Helper. I move that the Willing Workers 4-H Club make arrangements with the Grange to use the Grange Hall as a meeting place.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the Willing Workers 4-H Club make arrangements with the Grange to use the Grange Hall as a meeting place. Is there any discussion?

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Helen.

Third Helper. I believe it is impossible to come to a conclusion on this important motion without further investigation. There may be other places available for meetings. In order that the club may get all the information necessary, I move that the motion be referred to a committee.

President. To what committee shall the motion be referred?

Third Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Helen.

Third Helper. I wish to add to my motion the words “of three to be appointed by the President.”

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the motion before the club 21 be referred to a committee of three appointed by the President.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. Is there any discussion? All in favor, stand; opposed, stand. Motion carried.

Note: By securing the addition to the motion before stating the motion, the President saved extra voting or amendments to this motion.

Leader. (Discuss the importance of this motion and its relationship to the club.)

To Rescind a Motion

Leader. The purpose of the mo­tion to rescind or repeal is not to reconsider the vote upon a motion, but to render ineffective the vote for­merly taken on it.

A motion previously made and voted on may be reconsidered the day it was voted on or the following meeting day. After that, the motion to rescind is in order, but a motion to reconsider is out of order.

The motion to rescind may be ap­plied to the vote on all main motions, questions of privileges and appeals. A motion to rescind is not in order if, as a result of a vote, something has been done which cannot be undone, or a resignation has been acted upon, or some member has been elected to or expelled from membership or office, and has been notified of the fact.

If a motion is to be rescinded, notice must be given at a preceding meeting or in the call for the meeting; or if such notice has not been given, a two-thirds vote of those voting or a majority vote of the entire member­ship is necessary. If notice is given, a regular majority vote is required.

First Helper. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

First Helper. I move to rescind the motion passed at our last meeting in December by which this organization went on record as being opposed to help furnish a community meeting hall.

Second Helper. I second the motion.

President. It has been moved and sec­onded that the club rescind the motion passed at our meeting in December by which this organization went on record as being opposed to help fur­nish a community meeting hall. Will the Secretary please read the motion referred to?

Secretary. (Find and read the motion.)

President. Is there any discussion?

First Helper. I think that people general­ly are favorable to a community meet­ing place and that we should be, too.

Second Helper. I believe that since this has become a community project we should help, too.

President. If there is no further dis­cussion, all in favor of the motion to rescind this motion, stand; opposed, stand. Two-thirds of the members present favor rescinding this motion, so the motion is rescinded and should be so marked by the Secretary.

Advanced Parliamentary Practice Problems

Problem 1

This problem includes practice in the use of the previous question on pending amendments, objection to reconsideration of a question, and tabling a motion.

The motion, “I move the previous question,” cuts off all debate on both amendments and motion. If a member wishes to order or force a vote on the amendment only, he says, “I move the previous question on the amend­ment.” The vote is taken on the previ­ous question motion. If it carries, the vote is then taken, first on the amend­ment to the amendment, if there is one, then on the amendment. This leaves the motion in the same posi­tion it was before the previous ques­tion was ordered.

Helen. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Helen.

Helen. I move that all 4-H Club girls wear uniform dresses.

Bill. I second the motion.

NOTE: Amend this motion by inserting “green” after uniform; the amendment to the amendment by inserting “wool” after green.

Grace. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Grace.

Grace. I am not in favor of uniform dresses for school.

President. The member is out of order. Remarks should be on the amendment to the amendment limiting the discus­sion on the material to be used. Pete. (Rise.) Mr. President, I rise to a parliamentary inquiry.

President. State the inquiry.

Pete. Is it not practically impossible to speak on the amendment without also including the original motion?

President. While amendments are pend­ing, the debate can relate only to the amendment, or it may include the amendment and the motion only so far as a discussion of the amendment involves a discussion of the amendment and the motion.

Grace. I move the previous question on the amendments.

Helen. I second the motion.

President. The previous question has been moved and seconded. This re­quires a two-thirds vote. All in favor of the previous question, stand; op­posed, stand. (Carry this problem through.)

NOTE: Vote on an amendment to the amendment, then the amendment. If the amendment to the amendment carries, but the amendment does not, both amendments are lost.

Since every member has a right to introduce subjects, it has been pro­vided by parliamentary law that when a question unnecessary or improper comes, a member may object to its consideration. This applies only to motions introducing a new subject. Objection must be made after the question has been stated by the Chair, but before debate, amendment, or another motion is introduced. Objec­tion does not require seconding, can­not be debated or amended, and cuts off debate on the question objected to until settled. It requires a two-thirds vote to carry the objection.

If, however, the question objected to is not seconded, there is no need of voting on the objection, for the “motion is lost for want of a second.”

Sometimes it is desirable to put a question aside to be voted on later. To do this a member can “move to lay the question on the table,” and it re­mains there until taken from the table.

The motion to lay on the table ap­plies to nearly all parliamentary ques­tions. The following questions cannot be laid on the table:

  • To adjourn
  • To fix the time at which to adjourn
  • To lay on the table
  • Questions as to priority of business
  • To take from the table

To lay on the table cannot be amended or debated and requires just a majority vote. When the motion carries, it cannot be reconsidered, but may be taken from the table. When the motion is lost, it may be reconsid­ered.

When an amendment is tabled, the original question is tabled too.

John. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

John. I move that all nations disarm as the only means of permanent peace.

Helen. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Helen.

Helen. I move to amend the motion by striking out the word “disarm” and inserting “form a World Court.”

Bill. I second the motion.

President. (State the question.) John. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

John. I move the amendment be laid on the table.

Pete. I second the motion.

President. It is moved and seconded that the amendment be laid on the table.

John. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

John. I think the amendment should be voted on.

President. John is out of order. The question cannot now be debated as the motion to “lay on the table” is before the club.

John. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. John.

John. I move to amend the motion to lay on the table by adding the words “until next week.”

President. John is out of order. A motion to lay on the table cannot be amended.

NOTE. The club should vote on the question to lay on the table. If it is passed, no further discussion is in order.

Pete. (Rise.) Mr. President.

President. Pete.

Pete. I move to adjourn.

John. (Rise.) Mr. President.

John. I move we lay the motion to ad­journ on the table.

President. The motion to adjourn can­not be laid on the table. (Take vote on adjournment. )

Problem 2

In this problem a number of con­ventional points such as addressing the Chair and being recognized will not be recorded; however, in giving the problem these steps must not be omitted. It is thought by this time the club members are well informed in the rudiments of parliamentary pro­cedure.

Practice is provided in doubting a vote, reconsideration of an amend­ment, and adjournment.

If any member is not satisfied with the results of a vote, he may at once rise and say, “Mr. President, I call for a division,” or “I call for a standing vote.” This is done when the voting by ac­clamation seems close and a member doubts the accuracy of the decision. A standing vote can be counted ex­actly and is usually more deliberate. The vote should be announced by the Chair, but counted by the secretary who reports to the President.

EXAMPLE: A vote has just been taken on a motion to abolish final examinations from schools.

John. Mr. President, I call for a division.

President. A division has been called for. The motion is that finals, etc.

John. Mr. President, I believe finals are…

President. The member is out of order. No debate can interfere with the veri­fication of a vote. All in favor of the motion, stand; all opposed, stand.

NOTE. If all members have not voted, a member who voted may call for a full standing vote. Then all mem­bers are required to vote one way or another.

An amendment voted on and lost cannot be renewed during the same session.

The amendment, voted on and carried, cannot be changed during the same session.

When a group wishes to change or reverse any action previously taken on an amendment, the usual course is to reconsider the amendment. This is in order only when the motion to be amended is before the house.

Amendments of an original mo­tion are called primary or first-degree amendments.

Amendments to amendments are called secondary amendments. Every amendment of the first degree can be amended.

In order for the amendment to be reconsidered after it is voted on, the original motion must be reconsidered.

EXAMPLE. Use the previous mo­tion that final examinations be abol­ished from schools. An amendment was suggested and defeated that finals be abolished from state high schools.

John. (Starts to discuss subject. )

President. John is out of order. The mo­tion has been voted on and therefore cannot be debated.

Pete. I move to amend the motion by inserting the word “high” before the word “schools” in the original motion.

President. The member is out of order. A motion that has carried cannot be amended unless reconsidered.

John. I move to reconsider the amend­ment.

President. This motion is out of order. We cannot reconsider an amendment until the original motion is reconsid­ered.

Pete. I move we reconsider the original motion.

John. I second the motion. President. (Put motion to reconsider to vote.) Motion carried. The secretary will read the original motion. Is there any discussion?

John. I move we insert the word “high” in the phrase “from schools”.

President. This motion is out of order. An amendment lost cannot be renewed during the same session.

Helen. I move to reconsider the amend­ment.

NOTE. This is in order and discus­sion may proceed.

A motion to adjourn takes prece­dence over all other parliamentary questions, but is out of order:

  • While another member has the floor.
  • When a privileged motion to fix the time to which to adjourn is pending.
  • While a motion to reconsider is being made, to be entered on the minutes for future action.
  • While verifying a vote.
  • While the Chair is stating a question.
  • After the motion to adjourn has been lost. It cannot be renewed until after some business or debate has been conducted.

Before moving to adjourn, a mem­ber must have recognition from the Chair. The motion must be seconded. It cannot be amended or debated.

Problem 3

This problem includes practice in indefinite postponement and the previous question applied to a motion and its amendments. To postpone in­definitely is in order only when a prin­cipal motion or a question of privilege is before the assembly. The motion is debatable and opens the original or main motion to debate. To postpone indefinitely cannot be amended.

This motion can be reconsidered. If passed, this main motion (unless re­considered) is put aside for the entire session. If lost, the motion is just as it was.

EXAMPLE. It has been moved that the members of the club shall wear shorts on all hikes or outdoor activi­ties.

John. I move the motion be postponed indefinitely.

Helen. I second the motion.

President. Are you ready for the ques­tion?

Pete. I move we amend the motion by striking out the words “postponed indefinitely” and inserting “postponed until two o’clock tomorrow.”

President. The motion is out of order as a motion to “postpone indefinitely” can­not be amended.

President. (Allow discussion but watch for a “point of order.”)

John. I move the previous question.

President. The previous question has been moved and seconded. This re­quires a two-thirds vote. All in favor of ordering the previous question on the motion to postpone indefinitely, stand; all opposed, stand.

Helen. I rise to ask a question.

President. State your question.

Helen. As the previous question was not limited by the mover to the motion to postpone, does it not apply to the mo­tion also?

President. If the previous question is ordered while the motion to “postpone indefinitely” is before the assembly, it applies only to that motion. 26 EXAMPLE. Assume that the mo­tion to postpone is lost, and the ques­tion is again before the assembly.

John. I move to amend the motion by inserting the words “if the weather is bad” after outdoor activities.

Pete. Second the motion.

President. (Repeat the motion to amend.) Are you ready for the question?

Grace. I move the amendment be post­poned indefinitely.

President. The motion is out of order. An amendment cannot be postponed. Every amendment may be amended.

Amendments of an original mo­tion are called primary or first-degree amendments.

Amendments to amendments are called secondary amendments. Every amendment of the first degree can be amended.

While an amendment to an amendment is before the House, discussion must be confined to it; but may include the amendment and the main motion, so far as a discussion of the amendment involves a discussion of the amendment and the motion. If a motion is made and recorded to amend an amendment, the vote should be put in the following order:

(1) The amendment to the amendment.

(2) The amendment as amended.

(3) The motion as amended.

When the motion to amend the amendment is lost, the vote should be in the following order:

(1) The amendment to the amendment (lost).

(2) The amendment as originally stat­ed (lost). (3) The original motion.

When a member wishes to get a motion with its amendment and amendment to an amendment out of the way without further debate or amendment, he may do so by moving the previous question unlimited. This forces immediate vote on—

(1) The amendment to the amendment.

(2) The amendment or the amend­ment as amended.

(3) The original motion or the original motion as amended.

A previous question cannot be moved in such a form as to pass over the amendments and cause an imme­diate vote on the motion. The amend­ment to the amendment must be voted on first.

Problem 4

This problem includes practice in the reconsideration of a motion, amending by striking out and insert­ing, and point of order.

A motion already voted on cannot be amended, discussed, etc., unless again brought before the House. The only way to do this is to reconsider.

When voting is by acclamation, a motion to reconsider must be made by a member who voted on the win­ning side. Reconsideration is debat­able if the original motion is debat­able, otherwise not. To reconsider requires a majority vote only.

When a motion to reconsider is carried, the question is brought before the House in the same position it was before it was first voted on.

The motion to reconsider sus­pends all action regarding the original motion until the motion to reconsider is disposed of. EXAMPLE. The following motion has been passed by the group: “That cigarettes should not be sold to minors.”

Helen. I move to amend the motion by striking out the words “to minors.”

President. The Chair rules the motion out of order. The motion cannot be amended unless reconsidered.

John. I move to reconsider the vote.

Grace. I rise to a parliamentary inquiry.

President. State the question.

Grace. May a person who voted in the minority move to reconsider?

President. No. Will John please state which side he voted on?

John. I voted on the negative.

President. Then the motion is out of order.

Bill. I voted in the affirmative, but since there is dissatisfaction, I move to reconsider the motion.

Grace. I second the motion.

President. The motion to reconsider has been moved and seconded. Is there any discussion?

Jim. (Starts to speak against the motion.)

Helen. I rise to ask a question. (Parlia­mentary inquiry.)

President. State the question.

Helen. Has a member a right to debate the motion while the motion to recon­sider is before the assembly?

President. He has, since the motion itself is debatable. (Allow members, to dis­cuss all they wish to, then put motion to vote.) The motion to reconsider the motion just passed is before us. All in favor of reconsideration say aye; all opposed, no. Motion carried. The question is now before the House that cigarettes should not be sold to mi­nors. It is open to debate, amendment, or vote.

A third form of amendment is striking out a certain word or words, and inserting others in the exact place where the first were struck out.

To “strike out and insert” is one motion and must be debated, amend­ed, or voted on as such. To strike out and insert cannot be divided, and words struck out must be consecutive words. Words inserted also must be consecutive.

EXAMPLE. A motion is made that immigration should be prohibited.

Jim. I move to amend by striking out the word “prohibited” and inserting “regu­lated by a national board.”

It should be possible to carry out the drill on this or any other question in the same manner as in previous lessons. Try to get as many examples of points brought out in former les­sons as possible.

A point of order is rather an inter­esting feature of parliamentary law. It is used to prevent or to rectify a violation of the rules.

A point of order can be raised at any time when business is being con­sidered.

A member can raise a point of order while another has the floor.

Before stating a point of order, a member should rise and say, “Mr. President, I rise to a point of order,” without waiting for recognition from the Chair.

A point of order does not re­quire a second, cannot be debated or amended, and must be settled at once. The President may decide the point, refer it to a member, or to a vote of the group. If in doubt, either use parliamentary inquiry, or keep still. Do not use this method too freely. Be sure you are right before you speak.

Appendix

Contest Preamble

4-H offers many opportunities to be in­volved in educational events and activities. For example, members can choose to be involved in camps, project meetings, club meetings, spe­cial interest groups, festivals, fairs and contests. Participation in contests is one way that 4-H members can develop the following life skills:

  • Fostering positive self-concept
  • Learning decision-making and responsi­bilities for choices
  • Developing an inquiring mind
  • Relating to self and others
  • Acquiring a concern for communities—local and global

Some 4-H events and activities involve peer competition. Competition is an opportunity for work or performance to be evaluated against the work of others by a designated person who brings his or her own perspective and training to the event.

The results of contests provide a measur­ing tool to help make improvements in future endeavors. Contests also designate a higher achievement and lower achievement. It is im­portant for you to recognize this reality before entering a contest. It is also critical that you learn how to gracefully accept winning as well as losing. Both are equally valuable learning experiences.

Everyone who participates in a contest is a winner because you’ve taken a risk by asking for another person’s informed opinion about the quality of your effort. Regardless of the final determination or ribbon placing, those who participate in 4-H contests learn how to find information, organize ideas, put theory into practice, develop skills in communicating, and have fun interacting with other young people, leaders, and adults.

Contests and other competitive events are only one way to evaluate growth and development. There are also many other ways to evaluate progress. 4-H members themselves can continually evaluate their own work. This self-evaluation is a real “learning by doing” process.

Footnotes, Rules for Handing Motions, previous pages

1A tied vote is always lost except on a motion to appeal from the decision of the chair (see “Inci­dental Motions”) when a tied vote sustains the decision of the chair.

2Subsidiary motions are motions that pertain to a main motion while it is pending.

3Most incidental motions arise out of another question that is pending and must be decided before the question out of which they arise is decided

4The chair opens nominations with “Nominations are now in order.” Nominations may be made by a nominating committee, by a nominating ballot or from the floor. A member may make a motion to close nominations or the chair may declare nominations closed after assembly has been given a chance to make nominations.

5The mover may request to withdraw or modify his motion without consent of anyone before the motion has been put to assembly for con­sideration. When motion is before the assembly and if there is no objection from anyone in the assembly, the chairman announces that the motion is withdrawn or modified. If anyone objects, the request is put to a vote.

6A member may interrupt the speaker who has the floor to rise to a point or order or appeal, call for orders of the day, or raise a question of privilege.

7 Orders of the day may be changed by a motion to suspend the rules (See “Incidental Motions.”)

8Motion can be taken from the table during the meeting when it was tabled or at the next meeting.

9Motion to reconsider may be made only by one who voted on the prevailing side. A motion to reconsider must be made during the meeting when it was decided or on the next succeeding day of the same sessions.

10 It is impossible to rescind any action that has been taken as a result of a motion, but the unexecuted part may be rescinded. Notice must be given on a meeting before the vote is taken or if voted on immediately, a 2/3 vote to rescind is necessary.

Gavel Games

Former 4-H members who are now adults have consistently identi­fied their knowledge of parliamentary procedure as one of the lasting skills developed from their 4-H experi­ence. Consequently, this is a skill that we would like to preserve in our 4-H programming.

In the Gavel Games Contest, the contestants are teams of four 4-H members from a club who act as of­ficers for a model 4-H business meet­ing. In the senior division, these four team members are not told which of the four officers—President, Vice-President, Secretary or Treasurer—they will serve as until they enter the contest room. Consequently, it is im­portant to practice for all four offices.

If a club has five members they may all participate. The individual drawing “alternate” should only par­ticipate in the roll call, voting and discussion portions of the team’s presentation. In the intermediate divi­sion, a team of five can designate an alternate, before the other four team members draw for office. In the junior division, all offices can be assigned before the competition.

If your club has only six or seven interested members and cannot make two teams, one or two members from another team may be allowed to compete twice so that everyone has an opportunity to compete on a team. Each team presents a model busi­ness meeting starting with the call to order, including reports of officers and committees, unfinished and new busi­ness, and ending with adjournment. Teams will be allowed to use only the information sheets listed on the at­tached page.

Each individual team receives a score on the oral presentation. Con­ference judging is used to make the contest a more meaningful experi­ence. Teams will receive a written score sheet from the judge after the contest.

Age divisions for the Gavel games contest will be as follows: Junior, ages 9-10; Intermediate, ages 11-13; and Senior, age 14 and older. If a team is comprised of mixed ages, it will be considered in the category of compe­tition which the oldest team member would be categorized.

The gavel is a symbol of author­ity. The gavel is used by the person presiding to keep the meeting run­ning smoothly and orderly. To use the gavel properly, the presiding officer should stand squarely and firmly on both feet. Her or she should grasp the handle of the gavel firmly and rap table or gavel block authoritatively with well-spaced raps. The gavel is used to:

  1. Call the meeting to order—one tap
  2. Maintain order—several taps
  3. Adjourn the meeting—one tap
  4. Signify that motions have either passed or failed—one tap

SCORE CARD - GAVEL GAME

NAME OF CLUB:_______________________________

Please check: _______ Senior Team

_______ Intermediate Team

_______ Junior Team

Team Members’ Names Age Office Held (by drawing)

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________(Alternate) _______

  1. ORAL PRESENTATION
  2. Overall Presentation
  3. Pronunciation, Articulation and Volume (20 pts.)______
  4. Attitude, Naturalness and Ease of Presentation (20 pts.)______
  5. Appearance of Members and Presentation Area (10 pts.)______

(Sub-Total Possible 50 pts.)_______

  1. Presidents’ use of Gavel (5 pts.)_____
  2. Call to Order (5 pts.)_____
  3. Opening Exercise -Pledge or Motto & Roll Call (5 pts.)_____
  4. Reading of the Minutes (5 pts.)_____
  5. Communications (5 pts.)_____
  6. Treasurer’s Report (5 pts.)_____
  7. Committee Reports (5 pts.)_____
  8. Program (5 pts.)_____
  9. Announcements (5 pts.)_____
  10. Adjournment (5 pts.)_____

Sub-total: ___________

(Sub-total Possible 50 pts.)

L. Unfinished or New Business (Points determined by Parliamentary Procedure—See Scoring Procedure, below)

Scoring for Parliamentary Procedure

For each required parliamentary procedure problem introduced correctly, 15 points will be awarded.

In the handling of each different parliamentary procedure problem, 5 points will be deducted for each incorrect procedure up to a maximum of 15 points. No points will be earned or lost if a parliamentary procedure problem is introduced in the incorrect man­ner.

Done Needs Comments Points

PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE: Correctly Work

  1. Main Motion _______________________________________________
  2. Table a Motion_____________________________________________
  3. Amend a Motion____________________________________________
  4. Division of the House_________________________________________
  5. Take from the Table__________________________________________
  6. Division of the Question_______________________________________
  7. Refer to a Committee_________________________________________
  8. Rise to a Point of Order
  9. Withdraw a Motion__________________________________________
  10. Appeal the Decision of Chair ___________________________________
  11. Call for Previous Question______________________________________
  12. Rescind a Motion___________________________________________
  13. Reconsider a Motion_________________________________________
  14. Postpone a Motion Definitely___________________________________
  15. Introduce a Resolution________________________________________
  16. Reconsider & Have Entry in Min. _________________________________
  17. Postpone a Motion Indefinitely__________________________________
  18. Object to Consideration of Question_______________________________

 

Quality of Overall Discussion______(15 pts) Page 2 Sub-Total: ____________(135 pts)

Page 1 Sub-Total:___________(100 pts)

Grand Total:_____________(250 pts)

Requirements:

Juniors - Procedures 1-3 Intermediates - Procedures 1-6

Seniors - Procedures 1-6 plus an additional three. One of the three will be drawn for on the day of the contest.

Rules Pertaining to the Parliamentary Procedure Contest

(A) This contest will consist of teams of four (or five with an alternate) 4-H members: the president, the vice-president, program chairman, the secretary and the treasurer. Please refer to the score card for this contest to determine the scoring and point allocation system used.

(B) The order of business for the oral presentation is as follows:

1) Call to order

2) Opening exercise

  1. a) pledge or motto
  2. b) roll call

3) Reading of minutes, corrections if needed, approval of minutes

  1. a) the secretary should announce that there are no minutes due to the fact that this is a special parliamentary procedure presentation

4) Communications not requiring action—letters of appreciation, etc.

  1. a) one letter of communication is to be read

5) Report of Officers

  1. a) treasurer’s report is the only officer’s report that is to be given

6) Report of standing or special committees

  1. a) only one standing or special committee report is to be given

7) Unfinished business

  1. a) motions postponed at the last meeting and motions laid on the table at the last meeting
  2. b) the president should ask for unfinished business; however, it is recommended that all parlia­mentary problems be transacted during new business

8) New business as introduced

  1. a) refer to the “Approved list of Parliamentary Procedure Problems for the Parliamentary Proce­dure Contest”

9) Program

  1. a) the program chairman should announce that there is no program due to the fact that this is a special parliamentary procedure presentation

10) Announcements

  1. a) one announcement is to be given

11) Adjournment

  1. C) Three division levels will be held as follows: Junior, 9-10 years; Intermediate 11-13 years; and Senior, 14 and older. Each division will have a different score with the higher scores in the more advanced divisions.
  2. D) The following information sheets are the only notes that can be used during the oral presenta­tion of this contest.

1) Sheet entitled — Rules Pertaining to the Parliamentary Procedure Contest

2) Sheet entitled — Approved List of Parliamentary Procedure Problems for the 4-H Parliamentary Procedure Contest

3) Secretary’s letter of communication

4) Treasurer’s written report of the club’s financial state

5) Sheet pertaining to the standing or special committee report

  1. E) Each team will be allowed a maximum of 20 minutes to give their oral presentation.

Approved list of parliamentary procedure problems

for the parliamentary procedure contest

  1. Put a motion before the house
  2. Lay a motion on the table
  3. Amend a motion
  4. Call for a division of the house
  5. Take a motion from the table
  6. Call for a division of the question
  7. Refer a motion to a committee
  8. Rise to a point of order
  9. Withdraw a motion
  10. Appeal the decision of the chair
  11. Call for the previous question
  12. Rescind a motion
  13. Reconsider a motion
  14. Postpone a motion definitely
  15. Introduce a resolution
  16. Reconsider and have entered on the minutes
  17. Postpone a motion indefinitely
  18. Object to the consideration of the question

NOTE: Juniors are required to do the first three problems on the list; intermediates, the first six; and seniors are required to do the first six plus three additional problems, one of which will be drawn for on the day of the contest. Any age level can demon­strate any additional parliamentary skills they so desire.

For questions, refer to The Meeting Will Come to Order (#NCR228) available through your county Extension office.

Intermediate Gavel Game Quiz

Instructions: Fill in the correct response to these questions from the answers listed below. (Some answers can be used more than once.) (2 points each)

_____1. What is the correct form of introducing a main motion?

_____2. What is a quorum?

_____3. Are all main motions debatable?

_____4. Must one rise to second a motion?

_____5. How do you address the Chair?

_____6. What should the Chair say after stating the motion?

_____7. What is the best form in taking a vote by acclamation?

_____8. What is a main or principal motion?

_____9. What must be said following all main motions so that the item of business may be considered?

  1. Rise and say “Madam” or “Mister President”.
  2. “All in favor say aye; opposed no.”
  3. One that introduces business.
  4. The minimum of members who must be present to transact business.
  5. “I make a motion..
  6. “I second that.”
  7. By calling his/her first name.
  8. “I move that...”
  9. “Is there any discussion?”
  10. Yes
  11. No

Instructions: Draw a line from each pair of words in Column A to the correct descrip­tion of them in Column B. (1 point each)

Column A Column B

The House Another term for a motion.

The Chair More than half the votes cast.

The Floor The organization, the club.

The Question By virtue of or because of an office.

The Majority The presiding officer.

The Quorum Exclusive right to be heard at that time.

Ex Officio Numbers competent to transact business.

Senior Gavel Game Quiz

The following is a list of procedures and requirements. Please mark to the side of the procedures four requirements that must be made to properly use each procedure in a meeting. (1 point per blank)

Procedures:

Amending the Main Motion - To change the motion to make it more satisfactory to the group.

To Reconsider - To bring an item of business back before the group for discussion and another vote.

Point of Order - To enforce the rules.

Division of the Question - To avoid voting on too many questions at one time.

To Take From the Table - To bring the question be­fore the club again.

Requirements:

  1. It requires a second. F. It may not be amended.
  2. It does not require a second. G. It may be reconsidered.
  3. It is debatable. H. It may not be reconsidered.
  4. It is not debatable. I. It requires a majority vote.
  5. It may be amended. J. It requires a two-thirds vote.

Instructions: Please arrange the following items in order according to the 4-H Order of Business. Number them 1 through 11. (1 point per blank)

______ Program

______ Roll Call

______ Call to Order

______ Unfinished or Old Business

______ Adjournment

______ Announcements

______ Reports of Officers

______ New Business

______ Communications (no action taken, letters, etc.)

______ Reading/Approval of Minutes

______ Report of Standing and Special Committees

Senior Gavel Game Quiz - continued

Write “true” in the blank provided if the statement is true; write “false” in the blank provided if the statement is false. (2 points each)

_______1. A member may vote against his/her own motion.

_______2. Under the duties of the presiding officer, the Chair may not vote.

_______3. One must rise and address the Chair to obtain the floor.

_______4. The purpose of the motion to lay on the table is to bring an item of business back before the group for discussion and another vote.

_______5. To move the previous question is to stop debate and order an imme­diate vote on a question.

_______6. Calling for a division of the house means that a member desires to take a more accurate vote count.

_______7. If a quorum is not present, then the meeting will not be adjourned and official business will be transacted.

_______8. Referring an object to a committee will allow further investigation by a smaller group for the entire group to consider later.

_______9. To rescind or repeal is to reconsider the vote upon a motion, not cancelling the action formerly taken upon it.

Gavel Games Answers

Intermediate Gavel Game Quiz

H 1. What is the correct form of introducing a main motion?

D 2. What is a quorum?

J 3. Are all main motions debatable?

K 4. Must one rise to second a motion?

A 5. How do you address the Chair?

I 6. What should the Chair say after stat­ing the motion?

B 7. What is the best form in taking a vote by acclamation?

C 8. What is a main or principal motion?

F 9. What must be said following all main motions so that the item of business may be considered?

Column A...............................Column B

The House- The organization, the club.

The Chair.- The presiding officer.

The Floor- Exclusive right to be heard at that time

The Question- �Another term for a motion.

The Majority- More than half the votes cast.

The Quorum- Numbers competent to transact business

Ex Officio- By virtue of or because of an office

Senior Gavel Game Quiz

Procedures:

A, C, E, I, G Amending the Main Motion - To change the motion to make it more satisfac­tory to the group.

A, C, F, H, I To Reconsider - To bring an item of business back before the group for discussion and another vote.

B, D, F, H Point of Order - To enforce the rules.

B, D, H, I Division of the Question - To avoid voting on too many questions at one time.

A, D, F, H, I To Take From the Table - To bring the question before the club again.

Arrange in order:

9 Program

2 Roll Call

1 Call to Order

7 Unfinished or Old Business

11 Adjournment

10 Announcements

5 Reports of Officers

8 New Business

4 Communications (no action taken, letters, etc.)

3 Reading/Approval of Minutes

6 Report of Standing and Special Commit­tees

Senior Gavel Game Quiz - page 2

False____1. A member may vote against his/her own motion.

False_____2. Under the duties of the pre­siding officer, the Chair may not vote.

True_____3. One must rise and address the Chair to obtain the floor.

False____4. The purpose of the motion to lay on the table is to bring an item of busi­ness back before the group for discussion and another vote.

False_____5. To move the previous ques­tion is to stop debate and order an immediate vote on a question.

True_____6. Calling for a division of the house means that a member desires to take a more accurate vote count.

False____7. If a quorum is not present, then the meeting will not be adjourned and of­ficial business will be transacted.

True_____8. Referring an issue to a com­mittee will allow further investigation by a smaller group for the entire group to consider later.

False____9. To rescind or repeal is to re­consider the vote upon a motion, not cancelling the action formerly taken upon it.

4-H and Life Skills Development

Youth development is a process of mental, physi­cal and social growth during which young people prepare to live a productive and satisfying life. Youth development experiences of high quality don’t just happen. The best ones are carefully planned (1) to encourage life skill development while delivering subject matter content and (2) to achieve specific outcomes.

A skills is a learned ability to do something well. Life skills are skills that help an individual to be suc­cessful in living a productive and fulfilling life. The Targeting Life Skills Model categorizes life skills on the basis of the four “H’s” that represent Head, Heart, Hands and Health. Two general categories of skills are included under each of the four headings:

HEAD: thinking and managing

HEART: relating and caring

HANDS: working and giving

HEALTH: being and living

In each of the general categories, a number of important life skills have been identified as you can tell from looking at the TLS model below.

What is 4-H?

4-H is a part of the Montana State University Extension Service cooperating with the U.S. Depart­ment of Agriculture and your local county govern­ment. 4-H members are those boys and girls who participate in Extension-sponsored educational pro­grams which are open to all youth regardless of race, creed, color, sex, handicap or national origin.

The goal of Montana 4-H is to educate youth and adults for living in a global and ever-changing world by using the resources of Land-Grant Universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Montana 4-H uses educational, learning-by-doing projects, club meetings, community service projects, events, and activities for young people and adults as they work toward attaining these five LIFE SKILLS:

  • Fostering positive self-concept
  • Learning decision-making and

responsibility for choices

  • Developing an inquiring mind
  • Relating to self and others
  • Acquiring a concern for communities —local and global

The emblem of the 4-H program is a green four-leaf clover with a white “H” in each leaf. The four “H’s” stand for Head, Heart, Hands and Health and represent ways to develop the five life skills.

HEAD: Learning to think, make decisions, un­derstand the “whys,” gain new and valuable insights and knowledge.

HEART: Being concerned with the welfare of others, accepting the responsibilities of citizenship in our local and global communities, determining values and attitudes by which to live and learning how to work with others.

HANDS: Learning new skills, improving skills already developed, instilling pride in work and re­spect for work accomplished.

HEALTH: Practicing healthful living, protecting the well-being of self and others and making con­structive use of leisure time.

This four-fold development is vital to every indi­vidual. All four of the “H’s” should be an important part of the goals youngsters identify as they partici­pate in 4-H sponsored programs and educational activities.

The programs of the Montana State University Extension Service are available to all people, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, disibility or national origin. Issued in furtherance of cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics, acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Depart­ment of Agriculture, Douglas L. Steel, Vice Provost and Director, Extension Service, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717

We encourage the use of this document for non-profit educational purposes. This document may be reprinted if no endorsement of a commercial product, service or company is stated or implied, and if appropriate credit is given to the author and the MSU Extension Service (or Experiment Station). To use these documents in electronic formats, permission must be sought from the Ag/Extension Communications Coordinator, Communications Services, 115 Culbertson Hall, Montana State University-Bozeman, Bozeman, MT 59717; (406) 994-2721; E-mail - publications@Montana.edu.