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Documents on this page:Image of 4-H Horse with a Horse head

  1. Horse Project Requirments
  2. Horse Card
  3. Horse Helmet Release Form
  4. Every Time Every Ride Video
  5. Majestic Valley Arena Location
  6. Montana Bit Rules
  7. Horse Camp Member Registration (when available)
  8. Horse Camp Chaperone Registration (when available)

Members of 4-H may participate in many levels of the horse project. When 4-H members first enroll they must start at level 1 and must be assessed by a certified horse leader and bring a copy of the level assessment to the Extension office to move up in levels. Members must be at least 4-H age 8 to participate in the horse project. Other requirements are explained in the link below. Also check calendar above for dates.

4-H Horse Clinics

4-H Packing Clinics:

Other Horse Clinics:

Jan. 9th-Into to Packing,

1pm Family Life Christian Church

 

Jan. 23rd-Clinic I, 10am

Country Kitchen

 

Feb. 13th-Clinic II, 10am

Country Kitchen

 

March 27th-Clinic III, 10am

Bad Rock Arena

 

April 17th, Clinic IV, 10am

Bad Rock Arena

 

Horse Project Events

Printable version of Horse Project Requirements (PDF)

Horse Project

 To participate in the 4-H Horse project, members must comply with the following:

 

  • Have an updated Horse Card on file: by June 1. If you’ve changed horses or projects, please update your horse card. Last day to make changes to your horse project is June 1.

 

  • Have a signed Horse Project Release Form and a Horse Helmet Policy & Acknowledgement Form on file. Watch Every Time, Every Ride Video once as a Junior member and once as a Senior member.

 

  • Assessments: Each horsemanship manual has level assessments included in them. Review these with your certified horse leader (all horse members must have a certified horse leader that they’re working with) and turn-in assessments when you’re ready to move to the next level. Members will compete in the level they are working in; ex: if assessed out of level 2, the member will compete in level 3.   Assessments due by June 1st.

 

  • Clinics: Members must attend at least one 4-H horse clinic a year. Approximately 5-6 clinics will be offered every year. Dates & subjects of clinics will be announced throughout the year. Last opportunity to obtain a clinic will be June 1.

Horse Card

Printable version of Horse Card (PDF)

ATTACH PHOTO OF YOU

WITH YOUR HORSE HERE!

Circle Projects for this Horse below:

You can have a primary and a backup horse for each project (up to 2 cards).

 

Western Horsemanship

English Horsemanship

Working Ranch Horse

Driving

Packing

Colt to Maturity (can have one horse for each level)

Green Horse (can have one horse for each level)

Me and My Horse

Please complete a separate form for each horse used as a 4-H project horse. You can have a primary and a backup horse (up to 2 cards)  for each project. See back for list of projects.

MEMBER NAME:__________________________________________  PHONE: _____________________

 

EMAIL ADDRESS: _______________________________________  AGE (as of October 1st) __________

 

4-H CLUB NAME:_________________PROJECT LEADER’S SIGNATURE: _____________________

Place photos of horse on back of this form that clearly show markings.  All horse cards must be returned to the Extension Office no later than June 1st.

Please check if this is a mini horse project card. 

My Horse’s Name

(include horse’s full name plus nickname)

 

Horse’s Birthdate

 

Mare or Gelding

 

Color & Markings

(example: Sorrel with four white socks and a blaze)

 

Height of Horse

 

Person My Horse is Owned By or Leased From

 

The Montana State University Extension Service is an ADA/EO/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer and Provider of Educational Outreach.

 

 

Parent Signature________________________________________________________

 

 

4-H Member’s Signature__________________________________________________

4-H Horse Helmet Policy & Signed Form

Horse Helmet Release Form

Printable version of Horse Helmet Release Form (PDF)

Acknowledgement of Education

is Required YEARLY

4-H YEAR from: to:

County:

Participant Name: Birth Date: MM/DD/YYYY

Montana State University Extension: 4-H Horse Helmet Policy

A certified equestrian helmet with safety harness fastened in place is required in over fence classes and gymkhana events, activities, and practice sessions. Gymkhana refers to horseback speed events (timed or un-timed) that do not use livestock. Events that usually fall in this category include, but are not limited to: barrel racing, pole bending, keyhole races, stake races, rescue races, pony express race, etc. Events that are not intended to be included in this policy are events such as calf roping, team roping, goat tying, and team penning that may be timed but use

livestock.

Participants in the 4-H Horse Project are required to attend a helmet education workshop and/or view the video

"Every Ride Every Time" once as a junior 4-H member (9-13) and once as a senior 4-H member (14 and up).

It is the responsibility of the parent or guardian of the 4-H member to see that the headgear worn complies with such standards and is in good condition. The Montana 4-H Center for Youth Development encourages the use of ASTM certified/SEI approved safety helmets in all equine events. Protective headgear may be used in all classes and shall not be discriminated against.

Helmet use is encouraged in all 4-H horse activities any time a 4-H member is around a horse. Counties may establish more stringent policies regarding helmet use.

I have read, understand, and agreed to adhere to the above Montana 4-H Horse Helmet Policy in order to participate in the Montana 4-H Horse Project.

Participant Signature: Date:

signatures are required yearly

Montana State University Extension:

4-H Acknowledgement of Receiving Horse Helmet Education

I have attended a 4-H horse helmet safety workshop and/or viewed the video “Every Time, Every Ride”. I

acknowledge that helmet education is required twice during my 4-H membership - first in my junior years, 4-H age

9-13, and again in my senior years, 4-H age 14 and up, unless I joined 4-H as a senior member whereas I need only

receive training once.

Participant Signature:

Date of Education:

Printed Name of Parent or Legal Guardian:

Signature:

 

Horse Project 

Flathead County 4-H Horse Camp  takes place in May (check calendar above) at the Flathead County Fairgrounds! Registration and details below. Silent Auction items are greatly appreciated.

Every Time Every Ride Video

Every Time Every Ride Video YouTube Link

Her name is Sandy and she's a Appaloosa mayor and she's 21 years old.

[Music]

Her name's sugar and she's 16. I guess the thing I like most about riding is the relationship I have with my horse and all the fun that I have with my friends.  We've done 4-H,  NWPRA and we've tried Moxie's and she's a nice mayor. I like the jumping. You just jump right over and you get this big adrenaline rush. I like jumping, get thrown forward, and I love it probably the closest to flying I've ever felt.

[Music]

I like to stay under control and know I have it and I like to do mostly trail normal trail riding just nice and slow and easy working together as a team with your horse. The challenge getting a good race in and working with my horse. Oh, it's wonderful I don't know how to explain it. I like speed when I ride horses. I love to ride, speed, speed, speed. I guess, it's just the speed. Well, I just like horses.

[Music]

I think that a lot of people ride exactly for the same reason that I do, it's an unconditional bond between you and your horse. That is the beauty of this sport because it is the trust between the horse and the rider that is built up over years.

there is no more of an incredible experience for me more exhilarating than

to know that that trust between horse and rider is there.

[Music]

Whether a quiet ride through mountain forests, or a competition of speed and agility, riding is a celebration of oneness with another creature. A trusting a sharing of power and a lending of strength and speed and risk. We went out for a ride and he started off fine. Thunder started happening and the horse decided that he'd take a turn and I had my sense too tight and she started bucking and I wasn't ready for it and I was trying to stop. Her horse reared up. He started rearing for no reason. He slipped and I kept going straight. I slid right off his back and I hit the desk head first right into the ground. I landed on the ground on my head. I went down and I everything went black. She hit her head on a rock. She was knocked unconscious and she fell and it killed her. Sixty percent of all horse-related deaths involve head injuries. Fortunately there's a simple way to

minimize this risk. I have been riding internationally for about 10 years now

and last year warming up for the big fall. Three-day back east I and Sanskrip the horse that I rode in the Olympic games had an outstanding round going. We were

about three quarters of the way around, went into the water well then, we had to

take a sharp left. It was just with the shifting of my weight the horse drifted a little bit to the right, I caught one leg on one tree which swung me over head first into another tree. I was probably going about 20 miles an hour when I hit the tree

head-on. You know it wasn't a fence that we all worry about, it was just something that you know happened. If I wasn't wearing this helmet basically, I wouldn't be certainly in the condition I am in today and um it might very well be I wouldn't even be here today. I was found unconscious in the arena and I had probably been there for about 30 minutes before they found me and the the groom immediately called 9-1-1 and the rescue unit came and took me

to the hospital and I was unconscious for probably about 12 to 14 hours. I was in the hospital for five weeks and when I was released I had severe short-term memory loss because of the injury. I also lost coordination and they had to re-teach me how to walk again. When I first started to come back I didn't even know that I rode and my customers were of course panicked over that. It's like geez

here our trainer doesn't even know he rides. Thinking back on the whole situation and injury  I had been riding for 20 some years and training for about 10 years and it's one of those things that you know you don't think it's going to happen to you you know.  You hear about it but you know it's not going to happen to me you think you're immune to it and I'm living proof it happened to me.

[Music]

If you don't wear a helmet you can get really hurt. It wasn't real hot on the idea at first but I've gotten used to it. It's comfortable, I feel really safe with my helmet on. it's almost like a blanket for me. His hoof hit my helmet so I was  pretty happy I was wearing one. It's like riding in a car without a seat belt. You just you don't do it. We almost lost my sister so we've just always worn helmets ever since because we just don't want to ever take that chance of having someone get hurt again. I always ride in a helmet every time every ride every horse no matter how well I know them no matter how quiet a ride.

I'm expecting to have Rusty Nail, a true western horseman at 12. Rusty entered the Teves cup, winning the youngest rider award for this grueling 100 mile endurance race. He began training horses in his early teens and when he was about 18 19 years old he started training stock horses and then specialized in the cutting horse. I think his reputation was very good. He's very well known person. There was sometimes five horses in the barn sometimes 21 horses in the barn. He'd ride probably six or eight hours a day. Rusty participated in most of the competitions on the West Coast making semi-finals in Fallon Nevada, and top three riders in Ogden Utah. In the fall of 92 just a week before his life was dramatically altered by his choice to wear a baseball cap when riding. The horse went up with him and we feel went over backwards with him and he hit his head. I was in home for about three months longer than. A typical day for Rusty is very different now. He goes to Easter seals to class and works very hard all day long. Ss far as his therapies out there and the class work that he does as far as working on memory cognition um problem solving. He's uh now in recovery and intends to recover to a point where he will be able to ride again and he hopes to be able to train again but we don't know that that will ever happen. I didn't think it was born in the world. Then but I knew now yeah I think that a western horse men feel like that it's not needed. It's not macho just because I can't walk I draw my bounds anymore and I can't wait to get better but I haven't lost that opiate. I still think I'm gonna get better. I believe my recovery but I don't know.

Dr Jane Summers Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center had been practicing  internal medicine for six years. Her involvement with horses began in junior high school and included trail riding, breeding, and showing and I just went out for a Sunday morning ride it was we were just walking and I remember turning the horse to the left and that's when she went down on her knees. I was told she rared. That's when I got knocked out on the ground and I remained in a coma for three weeks. It was three years until I could shower, stand standing up, and it was four years until I could talk without having to sit down because I couldn't concentrate on my standing balance and what I was saying at the same time. It became a reality that I was impaired and I wouldn't be able to go back to medicine and it's easy to get around a driver's license but you can't get around treating patients before her brain injury. Jane was an avid four-season runner and described herself as the typical obsessive compulsive physician. Now I have the normal life of an 85 year old woman. What most people don't realize is that the brain sitting in your head, in my head is about the consistency of not quite set jello. That's why it's so fragile and can be damaged so easily. I had all sorts of plans for the future and they changed just in the moment of a split second because I was not wearing an SEI approved riding helmet. The Safety Equipment Institute or SEI certifies riding helmet models which meet the current American Society for testing and materials F 1163 standard for equestrian headgear. ETL laboratories is part of the inch cape testing services, the second largest testing and certification network in the world.

[Music]

A helmet absorbs energy by crushing. As it's doing that it slows down the process of stopping so that everything has time to come to a stop at the same rate. If you're falling unprotected and your head hits the ground, your head will stop so quick that the brain can collide with the inside of the skull, and that can cause brain damage bruising, breaking of blood vessels in the brain. To receive SEI certification, helmet models must meet stringent requirements of ASTM F 1163 300 G's is the internationally accepted threshold for serious brain injury. So in each of four impacts the helmet must not allow more than 300 G's to pass through it even a fall from only three feet. If unprotected can result in acceleration of over 300 G's on top of a horse the rider's head is at least six feet above the ground. If your helmet sustains any impact or you have a fall while you're wearing a helmet you should return the helmet to the manufacturer for inspection. The helmet may have been damaged but as this one shows that damage may not have been visible. Hunt caps, older helmets, and items of apparel are not SEI approved. They are not designed to absorb energy and they are obviously inadequate protection for your head. I would be back practicing medicine probably was in a short period of time after my accident if I had been wearing an SEI-approved helmet.

Polly liked everything. There was babysitting, there was sign language, and a couple different events, like bowling, ice skating, roller skating, and horseback riding. So they were always kind of a fantasy to ride this beautiful creature. When the accident happened they were on the main road going in so it was flat road. It was just a flat hard road, dirt road and they were coming back from their end of their ride and they were less than 70 yards from the end and her horse took off in a full dead run and Polly couldn't hold on. She tried to hold on and she couldn't. She kind of bounced off the back and landed right on her head on the trail and

she never gained regained consciousness. The loss that we have is so incredible.

[Music]

That just by simply applying a helmet and wearing it could save a life and would save somebody from going through what we're going through. It's an everyday

hole it's a black hole just an empty void that we will live with every day.

[Music]

Shauna took up the love of horses like I did. Because I loved horses she just she loved writing. I mean her love of life were horses. You know Shauna was riding since she was about six years old. She was 14 she's been on all different kinds of horses. She's been on young horses, old horses, small horses, big horses, she's been on draft horses. Silver was an eight-year-old registered or Arab but he was very gentle. She couldn't wait to get home from school to ride her horse and

she'd be out there grooming him and talking to him and she'd say she'd call his name you know Silver and he'd come winning and running up to the fence to her you know and you could see just in the short time that they were together, they had a bond. The neighbor was riding her horse and Shawna was writing Silver in our field right in our field I mean it was our field in our house she wasn't going down the road or anything she was in a hay field. One minute she was looking at Shauna and she was running around the field, and the next minute Nicole looked over and Shawna was down. They never bought the horse thinking that Shauna would die from a fall and I never ever entered my mind that Shawna would get killed on a horse. It never entered my mind to have a helmet on and um I would say to anybody to put, wear a helmet because if I had to do over I would do it and

it's not you know and now it's too late for me. You know I can't ha my daughter's gone. Sunset was she just finished her seventh grade year at a junior high she'd been very active in 4-H and she had a lot of opportunities coming up in 4-H. She loved her horse, she would she'd give up anything for her horse. It was a beautiful sunny day and it was they were doing things that they had done before and they were just having fun. They were out here giggling and laughing and taking turns. I heard this very loud crack, I landed on my head. Apparently the horse bucked and

decided to turn at the same time and when she came off she came off head first.

There was a the loud crack that I heard was her head hitting the ground. I was wearing a helmet because we always wore a helmet. It was just something that we always, always did. You know I wasn't even wearing jeans but I grabbed the helmet on the way out of the barn my mom said girls wear helmets so we wore the helmets. She's 16 years old now she's considering Veterinary Science in college. Things that that one slip off of a horse that spring afternoon could have ended all of that before the horse comes the helmet.

[Music]

I have my daughter here today a beautiful young lady and that could have been changed entirely because of her accident if she had not had her helmet on every time every ride wear an SEI helmet.

[Music]

There's no doubt about it SEI helmets work after the United States Pony Club made ASTM SEI headgear mandatory. They experienced a dramatic reduction in

the number and severity of brain injuries. You can have a severe brain injury even

if you're at a standstill or even if the horse is just walking. The force of just falling off the horse is enough to cause a severe brain injury. Many of the injuries that we see are just in the rider's own backyard. The horse could spook for any reason. At first the person may be unconscious or in a coma. Then they may never wake up from that. When they wake up they may have symptoms like head injury or blurry vision, trouble with balance or coordination, trouble with their memory

is very common, difficulties with speaking, walking, balancing or for instance, climbing or riding a bicycle be very difficult. To date the ASTM SEI-approved headgear is the best helmet available that an equestrian can purchase and wear.

The key is where well unfortunately my experience with head injury is not just as a doctor but also as a family member of a head injury victim.

My sister Laura fell off her horse and sustained a severe head injury and died about a week later. Unfortunately, Laura wasn't wearing a helmet when she fell off. Laura was an expert rider. She'd been riding for over 20 years. she rode dressage and when we found her she was 15 feet from the barn and so we really think that her fall was probably from a standstill or at most while walking and I think this just goes to highlight that you don't have to be galloping or jumping to have a severe head injury can occur even while you're standing still and certainly it can happen anytime. I know certainly Laura never expected it and just goes to emphasize you have to wear your helmet all the time.

Thankfully current ASTM SEI certified helmets are designed for comfort and practicality with removable liners, air vents for ventilation, fitting pads, or even an air pump liner to ensure a perfect fit every time. ASTM SEI hats come in a variety of styles, some weigh less than 11 ounces and colorful covers add individuality. The jaw strap should be securely fastened so that it touches the skin ASTM SEI approved headgear should fit snugly but comfortably so it cannot be rocked

out of position, forward, backward, or side to side. The skin or eyebrows should move when the helmet is rocked from front to back and the helmet should sit level from front to back. Choose the SEI approved helmet which best fits your riding style. Fit it properly and wear it every time every ride. You can't be a hundred percent sure that your horse is gonna be safe and you know they can even stumble like we stumble and you can go off. You know it's not, no horse is 100 bomb proof. It's when the quickness of that horse comes along that that's what we get caught. I think that if I had been wearing a helmet that I would have probably just fallen and been fine. You know gotten back up and got back on the horse and finished my work. If I do know all freaking environment, I assumed everything would be all right and that's one thing as far as horseback riding that I've learned now that you can't assume. My kids are my life and my life has been

severed. You know when Shauna died and it makes me just really really grateful that we had someone to tell us that the helmets were important and you know I wish all these other people had someone to do that for them. I would tell every rider that every time you get on a horse let's be safe not sorry and make sure

that you have your ASTM helmet on when you get on. You know your head's the only one you've got.

[Music]

Foolish not to protect it.

[Music]

To order your home version of Every Time Every Ride call 253-455-4570 this video is a must-see for anyone who rides horses. Order your copy today for just 15 call 253-455-4570

[Music]

You English (auto-generated)

 Majestic Valley Arena Location

Printable version of Majestic Valley Arena Map Location (PDF)

Image of Majestic Valley Arena Location

Montana Bit Rules

Printable version of MT Bit Rules (PDF)

Montana State Horse ProjectBit Rule Examples

The following pages are guidelines of the rules stated in the Montana State Horse Show rule book.   The pictures show examples of bits that are acceptable

(    ), are not allowed (   ),   or may or may not be acceptable     (   ) depending on a measurement that cannot be judged by the picture.   Understand that this supplement gives only some examples of legal and unacceptable bits. In no way does it try to include every bit that is allowed or not allowed. If there are any discrepancies between this and the printed rulebook text, the printed rulebook will have precedence.

  1. BITS - WESTERN AND SPEED EVENTS
    1. References to hackamore mean the use of a non-mechanical, flexible, braided rawhide or leather, or rope bosal, the core of which may be either rawhide or flexible cable. Absolutely no rigid material will be permitted under the jaws, regardless of how padded or covered.
  1. Reference to snaffle bits in western performance classes mean the conventional O-ring, egg-butt or D-ring with ring no larger than 4". The mouthpiece should be round, oval, or egg-shaped, smooth and unwrapped metal. It may be inlaid, but must be smooth. The bars must be a minimum of 5/16“ in diameter, measured one inch in from the cheek with a gradual decrease to center of the snaffle.   The mouthpiece may be two or three pieces. A three-piece, loose connecting ring of 3/4" or less in diameter, or a connecting flat bar of 3/8" to 3/4" (measured top to bottom, with a maximum length of 2"), which lies flat in the horse's mouth is acceptable.
  2. References to a bit in western performance classes mean the use of a curb bit that has a solid or broken mouthpiece, has shanks and acts with leverage. All curb bits must be free of mechanical device and should be considered a standard western bit. A description of a legal, standard western bit includes:
  1. 8 1/2" maximum length shank to be measured as indicated in the diagram illustrating legal bit.   Shanks may be fixed or loose.
  2. Curb bit mouthpieces must be round, smooth, and unwrapped metal of 5/16" to 3/4" in diameter, measured one inch from the cheek. They may be inlaid, but must be smooth. Nothing may protrude below the mouthpiece (bar),   such as extensions or prongs on solid mouthpieces. The mouthpiece may be two or three pieces. A three-piece, loose connecting ring of 3/4" or less in diameter, or a connecting flat bar of 3/8 to 3/4" (measured top to bottom with a maximum length of 2"), which lies flat in the horse's mouth is acceptable.

3.The port on a bit must not be higher than 2 1/2" maximum, with rollers and covers acceptable. Broken mouthpieces, halfbreeds and spades are standard.

  1. Slip or gag bits, and donut and flat polo mouthpieces are not acceptable.
  1. Except for hackamore/snaffle bit classes, speed event classes, or junior horses shown with hackamore/snaffle bit, only one hand may be used on the reins, and hand must not be changed. The hand is to be around the reins; index finger only between split reins is permitted.
  2. References to a romal means an extension of braided material attached to closed reins. This extension may be carried in the free hand with a 16 inch spacing between the reining hand and the free hand holding the romal. The rider’s hand shall be around the reins with the fingers closed, thumb on top, and no fingers between the reins.
  3. The romal shall not be used forward of the cinch or to signal or cue the horse in any way. Any infraction of this rule shall be penalized severely by the judge.
  4. Junior horses (4 years old and under) competing in junior western pleasure, western horsemanship, reining, western riding, and trail that are shown with a hackamore or snaffle bit will be ridden with two hands on the reins.
  5. Horses four-years old and younger may be shown in a snaffle bit, hackamore, curb bit, half-breed, or spade bit. Horses five-years old and older may only be shown in a curb bit, half-breed, or spade bit. In the speed events only, horses of any age may be shown with a snaffle bit.
  6. Chain curb straps are permissible, but must meet the approval of the judge, be at least ½” inch in width, and lie flat against the jaw of the horse. Absolutely no rigid material will be permitted under the jaws, regardless of how padded or covered.

English Division

  1. BITS - HUNTER CLASSES

Bits used in hunter classes must be at least 3/8" or larger in diameter.   The mouthpiece may consist of one, two, or three pieces and must be smooth. Waterford bits are permitted. Smooth full cheek snaffles are permitted. Any port may not be taller than 1 ½ ". Slow or fast twist, corkscrew, twisted wire, double twisted wire, and triangle (knife edge) bits are not allowed. If a bit is used that requires two reins, it may be used with a converter. True gag action and elevator bits are not allowed.  

  1. BITS - BRIDOONS (Saddle Seat and Hunter)

Design of the bridoon mouthpiece must conform with that of acceptable snaffles described in #32B and #33. However, smaller dimensions of the mouthpiece are permissible.

Speed Events Division

TACK: Western-type saddles will be used. A mechanical hackamore or other type bridles may not be used. Use of two hands on the reins is allowed in speed events. Judge or appointed equipment official may prohibit the use of bits or equipment deemed too severe. Use of martingales, tie-downs and nosebands is permitted in these classes. Draw reins are not allowed in speed events. Horses of any age may be ridden in a snaffle.

BITS: Will follow the same rules as the Western Division.

Saddle Seat Division

TACK: Flat English type saddles are required for trotting horses; hunter, forward seat, and dressage type saddles are prohibited. Dressage or breed specific saddles are required for non-trotting horses. Horses must be shown in full bridles (curb and snaffle) or pelham with two reins, standard walking horse bit, or bit appropriate for breed. No figure 8, flash, or drop nose bands are allowed in Saddle Seat classes. Snaffle bridles will only be allowed in Saddle Seat Pleasure, Showmanship, and Conformation classes. Bits with shanks over 8" in length not permitted. Draw reins, martingales, hackamore, and similar equipment are all prohibited. (Pasos may show in hackamores as approved by PFHA for Pleasure classes.) Set tails, boots and/or artificial appliances including chains and rollers (pertaining to legs) are prohibited.

 

 

 

If you want copies of the 4-H Horsemanship Level 4-7 and or the WA Horse Judging Competiion Manual contact the Extension office.

Horse Camp Member Registration (TBA)

Printable version of Horse Camp Member Registration (PDF)

Flathead County 4-H Horse Camp

April 30-May 2, 2021

Flathead County Fairgrounds

 

Dear 4-H Parents & Members:

This is our Annual Flathead County 4-H Horse Camp. Enclosed is the registration packet. This event is for active 4-H members and other youth who would like to attend. Please read through the packet carefully and feel free to contact the Extension Office if you have any questions at 758-5553 or Cheryl Favre 270-0669.

Registrations are due to the Extension Office no later than Friday, April 23, 2021. Early bird registration runs now through April 9, 2021 and will be $65.00 per 4-H member and $90 per non-member. A registration fee of $75.00 will be charged after April 9th; $100 for non-members. If there are multiple participants attending camp from the same household, a “household discount” of $15 per member will be allowed. 

A t-shirt and all meals are included with registration. There are no price breaks for partial attendance and $15.00 of your registration fee is non-refundable. A silent auction and other camp merchandise including baseball hats and pull-over jackets will be available during camp. Please bring funds if you choose to purchase items at camp.

A limited number of partial scholarships in the amount of $50 for camp registration fees may be available upon written scholarship requests. Requests may be turned in to the Extension Office or email to Cheryl Favre, cfavre@cmgengineering.com. You will be notified of acceptance or denial within a few days of submitting your request.

Stall fees of $10.00 per stall will be charged; however, $5.00 will be refunded at the end of camp if the stall is clean. (Fee includes one bag shavings. Additional bags available for $5.00 each or can  be donated back to Horse Camp Fund)

                 * No Stallions are allowed at camp.

                 * Advanced horsemanship members may consider bringing a young horse to camp for  experience. 

                                  - It is recommended that they bring a riding horse as well.

                 * Members are responsible for caring for their own animal.  Chaperones may assist.

                 * Members must strip their stall before they leave.

                 * Fresh water must be in front of your horse when they are in a stall.

                 * Members must be in control of your horse at all times. Do not bring a horse to camp that you cannot control.  

                 * Parents and relatives are there to observe and chaperone, provide assistance as needed.

                 * Non-participating siblings will be under the supervision of an adult.

                 * Visitors are welcome to attend. Meals must be pre-ordered and cost $5 per meal. 

                 * Members should bring the horse that they have identified as their project animal.

Members are required to have a chaperone present during clinic hours. These hours are Friday, April 30, 2021 from 4:00pm-9:30pm, Saturday, May 1, 2021 from 8:30am-9:00pm and on Sunday, May 2, 2021 from 8:30am-4:00pm. Chaperones are charged a fee of $35.00 for a t-shirt and meals, which includes Friday’s dinner, three meals on Saturday, and two meals and a snack on Sunday. A schedule of events is attached to this packet. Members who are unable to tack-up their own horse will require a chaperones help. A chaperone may be responsible for up to no more than 5 campers. Overnight chaperones are encouraged.

Member Registration

Mailing Address:

MSU Extension, Flathead County

1108 South Main Street Ste. 4

Kalispell, MT 59901

Phone: 406-758-5553

Fax: 406-758-5881

Email: extension@flathead.mt.gov

Montana State University Extension is committed to ensuring the civil rights of its clients and employees. Every client and every employee must be treated fairly and equitably, with dignity and respect. This policy applies to all clients and employees – regardless of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, veterans status, sexual orientation, citizenship, and marital or family status.

Montana State University Extension encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities. If you anticipate needing any type of special accommodations or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact Flathead County Extension Office at 758-5553 in advance of your participation or visit.

4-H camp participants are asked to stay with other members in the designated sleeping area unless camp staff is otherwise notified.

We will have a “Free Item Table” for participants to donate/share with others (New or Used). We will also be holding a silent auction during camp filled with fun merchandise that campers or parents/chaperones may be interested in purchasing. For this, please bring only New items. See the schedule of events for details. All proceeds will be used for the 4-H Horse Program.

Things you need to bring with you:

             Water Bottle (s)                                                                             Sleeping Bag & Pillow

             Cot or Air Mattress (strongly recommended)                                       Toiletries

             Medications (must be turned into the camp nurse)                A Towel

             Riding clothes and boots (no tennis shoes for riding)                          A Notebook/writing utensils

             Riding Helmet (unless a waiver has been signed)                    4-H Horsemanship Workbooks           

             *Money to purchase silent auction items or other camp merchandise                                               

Please use discretion when bringing valuables to horse camp.  Please clearly label all valuables. The Flathead 4-H Foundation is not responsible for lost or stolen items.

Things your horse needs:

             Feed (hay or grain)                                              Water Buckets

             Grooming Tools                                                   Saddle & Tack (show items are not necessary)                                       Stall Cleaning Items (wheel barrow and forks are optional but strongly encouraged.)

             Additional shavings if desired.

Please clearly label all belongings.

Immunizations are recommended but are at the discretion of the horse owner.

Flathead County

4-H Horse Camp

April 30-May 2, 2021

Flathead County Fairgrounds

For Office Use Only:

Date:                                          Amount:

Check      Check No.         Cash       

Participant’s Name:                                             Age:                         DOB:

Address:                                                  City:                                             Zip:

 

Phone:                                        M                       F                4-H Club:

 

Cell:                                              Email:

 

Horsemanship Projects  & Levels Currently Enrolled in:

 

Parents Name:                                                                 Interested in being Overnight Chaperone?   Y          N

                                                                                                                                                                                         Circle One

 

Each child is required to have an adult chaperone during clinic hours, (Friday 4:00pm -9:30pm, Saturday 8:30am-9:00pm, & Sunday 8:30am-4:00pm). An adult may chaperone up to 5 members. Chaperones are required to pay $35.00 for meal expense and are welcome to attend all meals provided. Chaperone fees also include a free camp t-shirt.  Chaperones must fill out a separate registration form.  Guests, siblings and non-chaperone parents who will be joining us for meals must pay $5 per meal in advance. 

 

Name of Chaperone:                                                                                  Phone:

Fees: Partial scholarships in the amount of $50  for registration fees may be available upon written request. 

                 Member Early Bird Registration Fee by April 9th- $65.00 or $90 non-members             

                 Member Registration Fee by April 23rd- $75.00 or $100 non-members                             

                 Multi-Household member discount -  Yes or No   Amount                                                                         

                 Stall Fee- $10.00 (includes 1 bag shavings). Extra bags $5.00                                                 

                 Extra Stall- $10.00/stall     # of Stalls                                X $10.00=                                                                 

                 $5.00 of stall fees are refundable at the end of camp if clean or may be donated back to Horse Camp

                 To help chaperones assist my child and others I would like to stall near the following campers:

                 1.                                                                                  2.

                 3.                                                                                  4.

                                  Guest Meals: ($5 per meal per guest)

                 Friday Dinner:                                                          (# of Guests)

                 Saturday:    Breakfast                           Lunch                      Dinner                   

                 Sunday:      Breakfast                            Snack                      Dinner    

                 Clothing available in youth and adult sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL, & XXL    

                 T-Shirt- (1st is Free, additional $15 each) Size:           Quantity:               Youth:                      Adult:     

                 (additional camp merchandise including baseball caps and pullover jackets will be available at camp)                   

                 Please make checks payable to the Flathead 4-H Horse Committee: Total:

CODE OF CONDUCT FOR 4-H MEMBERS

Name County

The 4-H Center & Montana State University Extension wants your participation in 4-H events and activities to be filled with exciting experiences, new friendships and fun. To ensure a positive experience for all participants, it is expected that each participant be considerate of others, participate fully in the programming and observe the following expectations (if a situation or question arises which is not clearly covered by this list, ask a chaperone or staff person before acting).

 

 I will conduct myself at all times in order to be a credit to the club, school and community. • I will dress neatly and appropriately for the occasion. • I will show respect for the rights of others to be courteous at all times. • I will be honest and not take unfair advantage of others. • I will respect the property of others. • I will refrain from loud boisterous talk, swearing and horseplay. • I not use my personal vehicle when it is not allowed by an event or trip. • I will demonstrate sportsmanship in the contests and meeting, modesty in winning and generosity in defeat. • I will attend sessions promptly and respect the opinion of others in discussion. • I will not purchase or have in my possession any kind of alcoholic beverage, drugs or tobacco. • I will care for the motel/hotel property and respect the rights of other guests of the motel/ hotel/ dorm and observe all rules instituted by the property. • I will be in my room and stay there after curfew time and I will be dressed and out of my room each day by the set time given by the chaperon(s). • I will be prepared to report to my club and other clubs knowledge gained by attending these activities. • I will respect supervision at all times, being responsible to all adults connected with the trip or event.

I have read the above Code of Conduct and understand that my infraction of any of the above rules will be cause for my participation in the trip or event to be terminated and for me to be sent home at my own expense.

 

Signature of 4-H Member                                                                                                 Date      

 

Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                                              Date

 

County Agent Signature                                                                                                     Date

Medical Release Form for 4-H Youth & Adults

PARTICIPANT INFORMATION:

Name:                                                                                                          County:

Address:

Name of Parent or Legal Guardian: (YOUTH ONLY):

Primary Physician:                                                                                                                   Phone:

Dentist:                                                                                                                                         Phone:

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:

Primary Contact:                                                                                                                      Phone:

Relationship:                                                                                                             City:                                                           State:

Alternate Contact:                                                                                                                   Phone:

Relationship:                                                                                                             City:                                                           State:

INSURANCE INFORMATION

Name of Insurance Carrier:

Policy Holder Name:                                                                                              Policy #:

Date of Last:

Tetanus Shot:                       Polio Shot:                             Mumps Shot:                        Measles Shot:                      Rubella Shot:

Medical Information: (check all that apply and explain if necessary)

 Stomach or Intestinal problems

 Diabetes or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)

 Nervous disorder (convulsions, epilepsy, dizziness, ect)

 Respiratory problems

 Heart Disease

 Any allergies to medication

 Any allergies to food or plants

 Special diet or food restrictions

 Are you currently under a doctor's care?

 Are you currently taking medications?

 Are there any physical restrictions or medical problems

that may require special considerations?

 

AUTHORIZATION FOR TREATMENT (YOUTH ONLY)

I,                                do herby give permission to         

to seek and obtain any medical care necessary for my child             .

Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                                                 Date

ALL PARTICIPANTS

To the Best of my knowledge, accurate information has been provided in all areas of this form.

Participant Signature (youth/ adult)                                                        Date

IF YOUTH: Parent/Guardian Signature                                                    Date

The Montana State University Extension Service is an ADA/EO/AA/Veteran's Preference Employer and Provider of Educational Outreach.

PARENT/GUARDIAN Name CHAPERONE Name

YOUTH Participant Name

MEDIA RELEASE FORM

Montana State University Extension

Name of participant:

County:                                                                                           4‐H Year:

MSU Extension  4-H would like to use photos or video of your child during 4‐H events or activities to use in

press releases and other publicity. The photo or film may be used for the following purposes:

• Website

• Press Release

• News Story

• Marketing Materials

• Other

CONDITIONS OF USE:

1. We will not use personal details or full names (first name and last name) of any child in a photograph on

our web site.

2. We will not include personal e‐mail or postal addresses or telephone numbers on our web site or in other

printed publications.

3. We may use the name of the child in accompanying text or a photo caption.

I DO authorize the use of photos or video of my child at 4-H events or activities.

I DO NOT authorize the use of photos or video of my child at 4-H events or activities.

I have read, consent, and agree, individually and, as a parent or guardian of the minor named

above, to the foregoing terms and provisions. I warrant that I am of full legal age and have every

right to contract for the minor in the above regard.

Parent or Guardian Signature                                                                 Date     

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Montana State University and the Montana State University Extension prohibit discrimination in all of their programs and activities on the basis of race, color,

national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital and family status. Issued in furtherance of cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics,

acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Jill Martz, Director of Extension, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717.

 4-H Horse Helmet Policy & Signed Form

 Acknowledgement of Education

 4-H YEAR from:

to:

County:

Participant Name:

Birth Date: MM/DD/YYYY

Montana State University Extension: 4-H Horse Helmet Policy

A certified equestrian helmet with safety harness fastened in place is required in over fence classes and gymkhana events, activities, and practice sessions. Gymkhana refers to horseback speed events (timed or un-timed) that do not use livestock. Events that usually fall in this category include, but are not limited to: barrel racing, pole bending, keyhole races, stake races, rescue races, pony express race, etc. Events that are not intended to be included in this policy are events such as calf roping, team roping, goat tying, and team penning that may be timed but use

livestock.

Participants in the 4-H Horse Project are required to attend a helmet education workshop and/or view the video

"Every Ride Every Time" once as a junior 4-H member (9-13) and once as a senior 4-H member (14 and up).

It is the responsibility of the parent or guardian of the 4-H member to see that the headgear worn complies with such standards and is in good condition. The Montana 4-H Center for Youth Development encourages the use of ASTM certified/SEI approved safety helmets in all equine events. Protective headgear may be used in all classes and shall not be discriminated against.

Helmet use is encouraged in all 4-H horse activities any time a 4-H member is around a horse. Counties may establish more stringent policies regarding helmet use.

I have read, understand, and agreed to adhere to the above Montana 4-H Horse Helmet Policy in order to participate in the Montana 4-H Horse Project.

 Participant Signature:

Date:

signatures are required yearly

 Montana State University Extension:

4-H Acknowledgement of Receiving Horse Helmet Education

I have attended a 4-H horse helmet safety workshop and/or viewed the video “Every Time, Every Ride”. I

acknowledge that helmet education is required twice during my 4-H membership - first in my junior years, 4-H age 9-13, and again in my senior years, 4-H age 14 and up, unless I joined 4-H as a senior member whereas I need only receive training once.

 Participant Signature:

Date of Education:

Printed Name of Parent or Legal Guardian:

Signature:

Date:

signatures are required yearly

Horse Camp Champerone Registration (TBA)

Printable version of Horse Camp Chaperone Registration (PDF)

Flathead County 4-H Horse Camp

April 30-May 2, 2021

Flathead County Fairgrounds

Dear 4-H Parents & Members:

This is our Annual Flathead County 4-H Horse Camp. Enclosed is the registration packet. This event is for active 4-H members and other youth who would like to attend. Please read through the packet carefully and feel free to contact the Extension Office if you have any questions at 758-5553 or Cheryl Favre 270-0669.

Registrations are due to the Extension Office no later than Friday, April 23, 2021. Early bird registration runs now through April 9, 2021 and will be $65.00 per 4-H member and $90 per non-member. A registration fee of $75.00 will be charged after April 9th; $100 for non-members. If there are multiple participants attending camp from the same household, a “household discount” of $15 per member will be allowed. 

A t-shirt and all meals are included with registration. There are no price breaks for partial attendance and $15.00 of your registration fee is non-refundable. A silent auction and other camp merchandise including baseball hats and pull-over jackets will be available during camp. Please bring funds if you choose to purchase items at camp.

A limited number of partial scholarships in the amount of $50 for camp registration fees may be available upon written scholarship requests. Requests may be turned in to the Extension Office or email to Cheryl Favre, cfavre@cmgengineering.com. You will be notified of acceptance or denial within a few days of submitting your request.

Stall fees of $10.00 per stall will be charged; however, $5.00 will be refunded at the end of camp if the stall is clean. (Fee includes one bag shavings. Additional bags available for $5.00 each or can  be donated back to Horse Camp Fund.)

                 * No Stallions are allowed at camp.

                 * Advanced horsemanship members may consider bringing a young horse to camp for  experience. 

                                  - It is recommended that they bring a riding horse as well.

                 * Members are responsible for caring for their own animal.  Chaperones may assist.

                 * Members must strip their stall before they leave.

                 * Fresh water must be in front of your horse when they are in a stall.

                 * Members must be in control of your horse at all times. Do not bring a horse to camp that you cannot control.  

                 * Parents and relatives are there to observe and chaperone, provide assistance as needed.

                 * Non-participating siblings will be under the supervision of an adult.

                 * Visitors are welcome to attend. Meals must be pre-ordered and cost $5 per meal. 

                 * Members should bring the horse that they have identified as their project animal.

Campers are required to have a chaperone present during clinic hours. These hours are Friday, April 30, 2021 from 4:00pm-9:30pm, Saturday, May 1, 2021 from 8:30am-9:00pm and on Sunday, May 2, 2021 from 8:30am-4:00pm. Chaperones are charged a fee of $35.00 for a t-shirt and meals, which includes Friday’s dinner, three meals on Saturday, and two meals and a snack on Sunday. A schedule of events is attached to this packet. Members who are unable to tack-up their own horse will require a chaperones help. A chaperone may be responsible for up to no more than 5 campers.

Chaperone Registration

Mailing Address:

MSU Extension, Flathead County

1108 South Main Street Ste. 4

Kalispell, MT 59901

Phone: 406-758-5553

Fax: 406-758-5881

Email: extension@flathead.mt.gov

Montana State University Extension is committed to ensuring the civil rights of its clients and employees. Every client and every employee must be treated fairly and equitably, with dignity and respect. This policy applies to all clients and employees – regardless of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, veterans status, sexual orientation, citizenship, and marital or family status.

Montana State University Extension encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities. If you anticipate needing any type of special accommodations or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact Flathead County Extension Office at 758-5553 in advance of your participation or visit.

4-H camp participants are asked to stay with other members in the designated sleeping area unless camp staff is otherwise notified.

We will have a “Free Item Table” for participants to donate/share with others (New or Used). We will also be holding a silent auction during camp filled with fun merchandise that campers or parents/chaperones may be interested in purchasing. For this, please bring only New items. See the schedule of events for details. All proceeds will be used for the 4-H Horse Program.

Things you need to bring with you:

             Water Bottle (s)                                                                             Sleeping Bag & Pillow

             Cot or Air Mattress (strongly recommended)                                       Toiletries

             Medications (must be turned into the camp nurse)                A Towel

             Riding clothes and boots (no tennis shoes for riding)                          A Notebook/writing utensils

             Riding Helmet (unless a waiver has been signed)                    4-H Horsemanship Workbooks           

             *Money to purchase silent auction items or other camp merchandise                                               

Please use discretion when bringing valuables to horse camp.  Please clearly label all valuables. The Flathead 4-H Foundation is not responsible for lost or stolen items.

Things your horse needs:

             Feed (hay or grain)                                              Water Buckets

             Grooming Tools                                                   Saddle & Tack (show items are not necessary)                                       Stall Cleaning Items (wheel barrow and forks are optional but strongly encouraged.)

             Additional shavings if desired.                                                   

Please clearly label all belongings.

Immunizations are recommended but are at the discretion of the horse owner.

Flathead County

4-H Horse Camp

April 30-May 2, 2021

Flathead County Fairgrounds

For Office Use Only:

Date:                                                           Amount:                 

Check      Check No.         Cash       

Chaperone’s Name:                                                                                   Are you over 21 years of age?  Y    N

 

Address:

 

Phone:                                                       M                      F                          4-H Club:

 

Email:                                                                                               Cell:

 

 

Are you interested in being an overnight chaperone:   Y          N

                                                                                              Circle One

 

Each child is required to have an adult chaperone during clinic hours, (Friday 4:00pm -9:30pm, Saturday 8:30am-9:00pm, & Sunday 8:30 am-4:00pm).  An adult may chaperone up to 5 members.  Chaperones are required to pay $35.00 for meal expense, and are welcome to attend all meals provided. 

 

Camper #1                                                                         Camper #2

 

Camper #3                                                                         Camper #4

 

Camper #5

Fees:

             Chaperone Fee- $35.00                                                               

            

             T-Shirt- (1st is Free, additional $15 each)        Size:                   Quantity:

             Sweatshirt        $25.00                                         Size:                   Quantity:         

             Clothing available in adult sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL, & XXL        

             (additional camp merchandise including baseball caps and pullover jackets will be available at camp)

             Guest Meals: ($5 per meal per guest)

             Friday Dinner:                                         (# of Guests)

             Saturday:    Breakfast                             Lunch                 Dinner

             Sunday:      Breakfast                               Snack                Dinner

            

Please make checks payable to the Flathead 4-H Horse Committee.           Total:   

Medical Release Form for 4-H Youth & Adults

PARTICIPANT INFORMATION:

Name:                                                                                                                           County:

Address:

Name of Parent or Legal Guardian: (YOUTH ONLY):

Primary Physician:                                                                                                                   Phone:

Dentist:                                                                                                                                         Phone:

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:

Primary Contact:                                                                                                                      Phone:

Relationship:                                                                           City:                                                                            State:

Alternate Contact:                                                                                                                   Phone:

Relationship:                                                                           City:                                                                            State:

INSURANCE INFORMATION

Name of Insurance Carrier:

Policy Holder Name:                                                                                                                                Policy #:

Date of Last:

Tetanus Shot:                       Polio Shot:                             Mumps Shot:                        Measles Shot:                      Rubella Shot:

Medical Information: (check all that apply and explain if necessary)

 Stomach or Intestinal problems

 Diabetes or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)

 Nervous disorder (convulsions, epilepsy, dizziness, ect)

 Respiratory problems

 Heart Disease

 Any allergies to medication

 Any allergies to food or plants

 Special diet or food restrictions

 Are you currently under a doctor's care?

 Are you currently taking medications?

 Are there any physical restrictions or medical problems

that may require special considerations?

 

AUTHORIZATION FOR TREATMENT (YOUTH ONLY)

I,                                                                  do herby give permission to

to seek and obtain any medical care necessary for my child                                                                                .

Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                                                                                   Date

ALL PARTICIPANTS

To the Best of my knowledge, accurate information has been provided in all areas of this form.

Participant Signature (youth/ adult)                                                                                  Date

IF YOUTH: Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                              Date

The Montana State University Extension Service is an ADA/EO/AA/Veteran's Preference Employer and Provider of Educational Outreach.

PARENT/GUARDIAN Name CHAPERONE Name

YOUTH Participant Name

MEDIA RELEASE FORM

Montana State University Extension

Name of participant:

County:                                                                                                        4‐H Year:

MSU Extension  4-H would like to use photos or video of your child during 4‐H events or activities to use in

press releases and other publicity. The photo or film may be used for the following purposes:

• Website

• Press Release

• News Story

• Marketing Materials

• Other

CONDITIONS OF USE:

1. We will not use personal details or full names (first name and last name) of any child in a photograph on

our web site.

2. We will not include personal e‐mail or postal addresses or telephone numbers on our web site or in other

printed publications.

3. We may use the name of the child in accompanying text or a photo caption.

I DO authorize the use of photos or video of my child at 4-H events or activities.

I DO NOT authorize the use of photos or video of my child at 4-H events or activities.

I have read, consent, and agree, individually and, as a parent or guardian of the minor named

above, to the foregoing terms and provisions. I warrant that I am of full legal age and have every

right to contract for the minor in the above regard.

Parent or Guardian Signature                                                                                           Date

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Montana State University and the Montana State University Extension prohibit discrimination in all of their programs and activities on the basis of race, color,

national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital and family status. Issued in furtherance of cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics,

acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Jill Martz, Director of Extension, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717.