Market

Our webpages must be accessible so we have our documents in printable/downloadable PDF version first, then we have the document in a webpage version. You may need to scroll through the page to find the document you are looking for.

Documents on this page:

  1. Market Livestock Requirements
  2. Wy do we have Scrapies Tags?
  3. 4-H Steer Nutrition
  4. 4-H Sheep Nutrition
  5. 4-H Swine Nutrition
  6. Hog Biosecurity Informatiion Sheet
  7. Market Livestock Committment Form
  8. Drug Withdrawal and Committment to Excellence Forms
  9. Market Sale Flyer
  10. Steer of Merit Results
  11. Lamb Ultrasound Results
  12. Symbol of Excellence Results

Beef     Lamb     Hog

 

Members of 4-H may enjoy participating in the market projects that include beef, lamb, and hog. Members must be at least 4-H age 8 to participate in lamb and hog, and 4-H age 10 to participate in beef. Other requirements are explained in the link below.

4-H Steer Livestock Quality Assurance (LQA) is held October. 29, 2019. Steer weigh-in for 4-H is every Image of steer partssecond Saturday in December. Check webpage calendar for more information.

4-H Hog Livestock Quality Assurance (LQA) will be held on March 5, 2020. Check Image of hog partsthe webpage calendar for more information.

4-H Sheep Livestock Quality Assurance (LQA) will be held on MarchImage of sheep parts 20, 2020. Check the webpage calendar for more information.

All first year market members are required to attend the LQA in the specific species. Every market member is required to attend LQA once as a junior member and once as a senior member.

Market Livestock Requirementsimage of livestock trio

Printable version of Market Livestock Requirements (PDF)

Market Livetock Project

 4-H: The Youth Development Program of MSU Extension

 To participate in the NWMT Fair market sale, Market Livestock project members must comply with the following:

 

  • Be enrolled and in good standing in an active community 4-H Club and be working closely with a livestock leader. This means that you have complied with all club and county expectations and that you have paid all registration fees.

 

  • Submit a signed copy of the Market Livestock Commitment form to your club leader by the deadline listed.

 

  • Participate in Livestock Quality Assurance Training  in your first year of taking the market animal. Livestock Quality Assurance Training is composed of Livestock Quality Assurance (LQA) and market animal project seminar training. All members will attend LQA during their first registered year as a Junior member in the livestock project and again during their first registered year as a Senior member. (Jr. members = 8-13; Sr. members = 14-18). All members are welcome to attend seminars as often as they’d like; however, it is mandatory to attend in your first year selling that species.
  • In order to be eligible to take a market beef project, a member must be 10 years of age on or before Oct. 1st of the current 4-H year.

 

  • Ensure that your animal is weighed & tagged as dictated by the program. Each 4-H member may tag up to two animals in each market livestock project. Tagging paperwork must be completed & turned-in to the Extension office by the deadline posted. Last day to replace livestock; steers - Jan. 31; hogs - May 31; lambs - June 30. On your tagging paperwork, you will need to declare the tag number of your primary and your secondary animal if you have a back-up. Once you declare, you are committed to that/those animals: siblings cannot swap primary or secondary livestock.

 

  • In July, complete & turn-in a signed copy of Commitment to Excellence/Drug Withdrawal forms (this is a two-sided form) to your club/livestock leader.  You also need to have updated records for your market livestock project(s) and one other project for your club/livestock leader to review. Be sure to keep records on your primary AND your back-up.

 

  • On or before Aug. 1, register your fair projects with the fair office by completing fair paperwork; online (go to www.nwmtfair.com for registration info). Your leader does NOT do this for you.

 

  • You may bring only 1 hog or 1 sheep or 1 steer to the fair. If you have a primary & a back-up, you can choose which one you’re bringing on the morning of check-in. * See annual NWMT Fair book for all fair rules & expectations at www.nwmtfair.com.

 

  • All market animals will be weighed on Monday of the fair. Bring $40 non-refundable to pay for the livestock sale. No one is allowed behind the barriers during weigh-in except for the 4-H member whose animal is being weighed. If your animal does not make weight, you can stay at the fair and participate in showmanship and feeder market classes, but you cannot sell.

 

  • If you sold in the market, photos of you and your animal will be made ready for you to take to your buyer after fair. The buyer’s thank you form needs to also be taken and signed by anyone at the buyers location. This form must be returned to the Extension office by Dec 1st or you will not be able to take a market project the following year.

 

  • Annual Awards Ceremony will take place at the end of Aug/beg of Sept. Be sure to attend this ceremony so you can be recognized for all your hard work and support others who are being recognized.  Afterwards, be sure to thank all sponsors of awards that you received.

 

  • September is the last month of the 4-H year. During that time you should have your records and bookwork for all 4-H projects complete and submitted to your club leader or you will not be able to take a market project the following year.

Why we have Scrapies Tags?

Printable version of Scrapies Tag information for Sheep and Goat Breeders (PDF)

Why we have Scrapies Tags?

(Sheep Breeders and Goat Breeders)

 The scapies tag is identifying the origin of the sheep. If the sheep were to develop scarpie later in life, it could then be traced back to its original farm and breeder by its scrapies tag.

 If members continue to have a need for tags, they would then be considered producers and should have their own scapies tags. The USDA provides tags and applicators for free. Producers should pursue that route, rather than getting the scapies tags from the MSU Extension office.

 We encourage members with breeding programs to get their own scapies tags if possible. On occasion possible one time 4-H breeders or new 4-H breeders might need scrapies tags, during these times is when it is reasonable for members to get scrapies tags from the MSU Extension office.

 Brochure describes what animals need tags and where to order free tags, etc: http://www.aphis.usda.gov

 Link to info on ordering tags: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth?1dmy&urile=wcm%3apath%3a%2Faphis_content_library%2Fsa_our_focus%2Fsa_animal_health%2Fsa_animal_disease_information%2Fsa_sheep_goat_health%2Fsa_scrapie%2Fct_to_order_ear_tags

 You can call 1-866-873-2824 to order scrapies tags if you call from an area code 406 phone number (if you call from a non-406 area code phone number it will take you to a different state other than Montana). If you call from a non-406 area code phone number you can call 1-406-449-2220 to order scapies tags. The order time is 2 – 4 weeks.

Flathead 4-H Steer Nutrition

Printable version of Flathead 4-H Steer Nutrition (PDF)

Flathead County 4-H Steer Projects Nutrition and You

Cash Yount

CHS Nutrition

Nutrition Consultant

Tomorrow’s producers Today

  • What is your project?
  • What are your goals?
  • What are your tools?
  • What is your motivation?

Put Your Best Food Forward

  • Select the right animal for the right date
  • Determine how much weight gain is needed
  • Determine ADG(Average Daily Gain)
  • Select Feed Source
  • Provide the best growing environment

Selecting Your Animal

  • Know your fair date
  • Know your finish weight goal
  • Personal history in the project
  • Budget

Let’s Get to Work

  • Animal
  • Feed Plan
  • Shelter/Space

Project Profiles

4H and FFA Livestock Market Project Management Tips

Average Finished Rectal

ADG Days ADG Weight Range Temperature

Beef 2.8#2402-4#1200-1400#101 F

Swine1.7#901-2#230-270#102.5 F

Sheep0.6#900.4-0.9#125-150# 102.3 F

Goat0.35#900.25-.6#80-120#103 F

Average Daily Gain

TAKE POUNDS OF GAIN NEEDED DIVIDED

BY NUMBER OF DAYS TILL THE SHOW

EXAMPLE

Market Steer

1250# target wt-800# current wt= 450# gain

150 days to the fair

450#/150 days = 3# of gain per day

Nutritional Requirements

  • ENERGY
  • PROTEIN
  • FIBER
  • MACRO MINERALS
  • MICRO MINERALS
  • WATER

Meeting Those Requirements

  • Grains-whole, ground and rolled-Corn, Oats, Barley
  • Fiber sources-Beet pulp, midds, corn cobs, malt sprouts, alfalfa pellets
  • Protein-SBM, canola, DDG
  • Fat-Vegetable oil, DDG, Rice Bran
  • Forage-straw, grass, grain hay, alfalfa

Beef Feed Tag

  • CP 16% for optimum muscle development
  • 3-5% Fat for improved hair sheen and bloom
  • Full trace mineral and vitamin package for improved health and performance

Feed Additives

  • IONOPHORES-BOVATEC

--Improves feed efficiency and rate of gain, helps prevent coccidiosis. Has no withdrawal

  • SODIUM BICARB

--Helps prevent acidosis

  • YEAST

--Keeps rumen microbes functioning at high levels. Great for the heat of the summer

Always Check the Tag

  • Name of feed
  • Is it the right kind of feed
  • Medicated
  • Feeding directions
  • Form

General Feeding Guidelines

  • Hand feed twice daily, close to the same time of day. You will get the best gains and feed efficiencies this way!
  • If self-feeding, never let the feeder run empty and keep it clean of bad feed and foreign material.
  • Feed by weight and not volume
  • Feed long stem, grass / grass alfalfa mix hay, no straight alfalfa.
  • Provide free choice salt and mineral

Start on Feed

  • Start slow and be consistent with your feeding times
  • WEIGHFEED OUT-AVOID FEEDING BY VOLUME
  • Start calves on 4 pounds of grain a day
  • INCREASE FEED: 1# for SteersPER DAY EVERY 3 DAYSAS LONG AS THEY ARE CLEANING IT UP

Beef Feeding Table

  • Feeding steers multiple feedings per day will improve gains and performance
  • Feeding a balanced diet is very key to optimizing gain
  • Avoid feeding forage that would considered to rich

Payback Show Steer Feeding Sheet

Steer Wt.

Days on Feed

# Grain

# Hay

700

1

14

14

7

750

15

28

15

7.5

800

29

42

16

8

850

43

56

16.5

8

900

57

70

17

8.3

950

71

84

17.5

8.7

1000

85

98

18.5

9

1050

99

112

19.5

8

1100

113

126

20.5

7

1150

127

140

21.5

6.5

1200

141

154

22.5

6

1250

155

168

23.5

6

1300

169

182

24

5.5

Totals

600#

3444

1337

           

Why Your Animal Might Go Off Feed

  • Animals will go off feed for many reasons. The feed is not the only reason animals go off feed. Good management will reduce and minimize this obstacle.
  • Bloat or acidosis will cause animals to go off of feed, the leading causes for this are:
  • Irregular feedings
  • Change of feeds
  • Feeding of rich forage such as alfalfa

Animals tend to go off feed if:

  • No water is available to drink or the water is frozen, too hot or dirty
  • They are sick
  • They are stressed
  • Keep accurate records or what your animal normally consumes

How much they eat

How fast they eat it

  • Understand what is normal behavior and watch for any changes in this behavior

Daily Water Needs for Livestock

  • BEEF CATTLE-7 TO 17 GALLONS
  • DAIRY CATTLE-10 TO 29 GALLONS
  • HORSE-8 TO 12 GALLONS
  • SHEEP/GOATS-1 TO 4 GALLONS
  • SWINE-3 TO 6 GALLONS

Maintain cool, clean, free choice access to water!

Let’s Get to Work

  • Animal
  • Feed Plan
  • Shelter/Space

Make ‘Em Cozy

  • Make sure that your animal has enough space
  • Have a place the animal can get out of the weather
  • This means both the HOTand the COLD
  • Animals will perform best on feed between 50-68
  • Have a plan for the extreme heat

Space Requirements

Steers—60-80 square feet for pen

15-20 square feet for shelter

20-24” in surface area for feeder

18-22”(throat high) for feeder height

10-14” for feeder depth

Normal outdoor lighting 6hrs dark/light

Proper Ventilation

Let’s Get to Work

  • Animal
  • Feed Plan
  • Shelter/Space

Some Final Thoughts

  • Have a good health check list
  • Dewormand vaccinate-check with your veterinarian for recommendations
  • Have a veterinarian connection
  • Have an emergency plan
  • Work with animals during the comfortable time of day for the animal
  • Use the tools you have
  • Have a blast
  • Take pride it your project

Questions

Cash Yount

cash.yount@chsinc.com

406-231-0834

Flathead 4-H Sheep Project Nutrition

Printable verson of Flathead 4-H Sheep Project Nutrition (PDF)

Flathead County 4-H Sheep Projects Nutrition and You

Cash Yount

CHS Nutrition

Nutrition Consultant

Tomorrow’s Producers Today

  • What is your project?
  • What are your goals?
  • What are your tools?
  • What is your motivation?

Put Your Best Food Forward

  • Select the right animal for the right date
  • Determine how much weight gain is needed
  • Determine ADG(Average Daily Gain)
  • Select Feed Source
  • Provide the best growing environment

Let’s Get to Work

  • Animal
  • Feed Plan
  • Shelter/Space

Project Profiles

4H and FFA Livestock Market Project Management Tips

Average Finished Rectal

ADGDays ADG Weight RangeTemperature

Beef 2.8#2402-4#1200-1400#101 F

Swine1.7#901-2#230-270#102.5 F

Sheep0.6#900.4-0.9#125-150# 102.3 F

Goat0.35#900.25-.6#80-120#103 F

Average Daily Gain

TAKE POUNDS OF GAIN NEEDED DIVIDED

BY NUMBER OF DAYS TILL THE SHOW

EXAMPLE

Market Lamb

130# target wt-70# current wt=60# gain

80 days to the fair

60#/80 days =0.75# of gain per day

Nutritional Requirement 

  • ENERGY
  • PROTEIN
  • FIBER
  • MACRO MINERALS
  • MICRO MINERALS
  • WATER

Meeting Those Requirements

  • Grains-whole, ground and rolled-Corn, Oats, Barley
  • Fiber sources-Beet pulp, midds, corn cobs, malt sprouts, alfalfa pellets
  • Protein-SBM, canola, DDG
  • Fat-Vegetable oil, DDG, Rice Bran
  • Forage-straw, grass, grain hay, alfalfa

Lamb Feed Tag

  • CP of 16-17% for optimum muscle development
  • Hi Fat 3-4% for improved shine and weight gain
  • Full trace mineral and vitamins for improved health
  • Diamond V yeast culture to help keep lambs on feed
  • Feed Additives

Feed Additives

  • IONOPHORES-BOVATEC OR RUMENSIN

--Improves feed efficiency and rate of gain, helps prevent coccidiosisand has no withdrawal

  • SODIUM BICARB

--Helps prevent acidosis

  • YEAST

--Keeps rumen microbes functioning at high levels Great for the heat of the summer

Always Check the Tag 

  • Name of feed
  • Is it therightkind of feed
  • Medicated
  • Feeding directions
  • Form

General Feeding Guidelines

  • Hand feed twice daily, close to the same time of day. You will get the best gains and feed efficiencies this way!
  • If self-feeding, never let the feeder run empty and keep it clean of bad feed and foreign material.
  • Feed by weight and not volume
  • Feed long stem, grass / grass alfalfa mix hay, no straight alfalfa.
  • Provide free choice salt and mineral

Starting on Feed 

  • Start slow and be consistent with your feeding times
  • WEIGHFEED OUT-AVOID FEEDING BY VOLUME
  • Start lambs on .25-.50 pounds of grain a day
  • INCREASE FEED: 0.25 # for LambsPER DAY EVERY 3 DAYSAS LONG AS THEY ARE CLEANING IT UP

Sheep Feeding Table

Payback Show Sheep Feeding Sheet

Sheep Wt.

Days on Feed

# Grain

# Hay

55

1

12

2.3

1

66

13

24

2.5

1

77

25

36

2.9

1

88

37

48

3.3

1

99

49

60

3.8

1

110

61

72

4.2

1

121

73

84

4.3

1

131

85

96

4.4

1

Totals

76

332.4

76

           

  • Lamb feed needs to be very palatable to keep them on feed through out the summer heat
  • Feeding lambs multiple times per day will help them achieve gains higher than expected

Why Your Animal Might Go Off Feed

  • Animals will go off feed for many reasons. The feed is not the sole reason animals go off feed. Good management will reduce and minimize this obstacle.
  • Bloat or acidosis will cause animals to go off of feed and leading causes for this are:

Irregular feedings

Change of feeds

Feeder ran out feed and was recently refilled and animals overate

Feeding of rich forage such as alfalfa with a rich energy feed

 

  • Animals tend to go off feed if:

No water is available to drink or the water is frozen, too hot or dirty

They are sick

They are stressed

  • Keep accurate records or what your animal normally consumes
  • How much they eat
  • How fast they eat it
  • Understand what is normal behavior and watch for any changes in this behavior

Daily Water Needs for Livestock

  • BEEF CATTLE-7 TO 17 GALLONS
  • DAIRY CATTLE-10 TO 29 GALLONS
  • HORSE-8 TO 12 GALLONS
  • SHEEP/GOATS-1 TO 4 GALLONS
  • SWINE-3 TO 6 GALLONS

Maintain cool, clean, free choice access to water!

Let’s Get to Work

  • Animal
  • Feed Plan
  • Shelter/Space

Make ‘Em Cozy

  • Make sure that your animal has enough space
  • Have a place the animal can get out of the weather
  • This means both the HOTand the COLD
  • Animals will perform best on feed between 50-68 degrees F
  • Have a plan for the extreme heat

Space Requirements

Lambs—10-15 square feet for pen

12” in surface area for feeder

10”(throat high) for feeder height

Normal outdoor lighting 6hrs light/dark

Proper ventilation

Let’s Get to Work

  • Animal
  • Feed Plan
  • Shelter/Space

Some Final Thoughts

  • Have a good health check list
  • Dewormand vaccinate-check with your veterinarian for recommendations
  • Have a veterinarian connection
  • Have an emergency plan
  • Work with animals during the comfortable time of day for the animal
  • Use the tools you have
  • Have a blast
  • Take pride it your project

Questions?

4-H Swine Nutrion

Printable version of 4-H Swine Nutrition (PDF)

4-H Swine Nutrition

 Crystal White, PAS

CHS Nutrition

Your 4-H Project

  • Breed
  • Body parts
  • Management
  • Record keeping
  • Showing
  • Budget
  • NUTRITION!!!!Image of hog digestive track

Digestive Track

Covert Feed to Meat

3 lbs Feed = 1 lb

Swine Production

  • Phase Feeding
    • Starter
    • Grower
    • Finisher
    • Gestation
    • Lactation

What Types of Nutrients are There?

Protein, Carbohydrates, & Fats = Vitamins, Energy, Minerals, & Water

What are the 5 Major Nutrients?

  • Water
    • Most important nutrient
  • Protein
    • Help animal create muscle, milk, enzymes, & more
  • Energy
    • Carbohydrates & fats give animals energy
  • Minerals
    • Basic foundation for nutrition. Needed for strong bones, heart & nerves to work, and body fluid balance
  • Vitamins
    • Include vitamin A,C,D,E,K and B vitamins. These are needed for strong bones, vision, growth, & milk production

Types of Nutrients…

  •  Water –the MOST IMPORTANT
  • Animal’s body is 70% water
  • Important for nutrient transport, waste removal, and digestion
  • Supply CLEAN, FRESH SUPPLY daily!!!

Daily Water Needs for Livestock

  •  Beef Cattle-7 TO 17 Gallons
  • Dairy Cattle-10 TO 29 Gallons
  • Horse-8 TO 12 Gallons
  • Sheep/Goats-1 TO 4 Gallons
  • Swine-3 TO 6 Gallons
  • Maintain cool, clean, free choice access to water!

Feeding Options…

  • Complete Feeds
  • Concentrates
    • Require Grain
  • Premixes
    • Require Grains
    • Protein Source

Why a Complete Feed Over Other Feeds?

  •  Don’t need to add anything!
  • Energy dense with grains and fats to get optimal performance
  • Added lysine (most limiting amino acid that is needed for muscle growth and development) Requirement: 1% Lysine
  • F:G 3:1 vs. 3 ½ -4:1 F:G, which means it takes less feed to get the results you are trying to achieve
  • Grain products-Lighter, skinner; some tend to be fatter with less muscle; stand out in the show ring!!!

Medications-CTC?

 Why does my feed contain CTC?

  • Improved feed efficiency and it reduces scours; we also see less respiratory issues in the hogs
  • Is there a withdrawal period?
  • NO! There is NOT a withdrawal period; it says right on the tag!
  • What is Bio-Mos and why is that in my feed?
  • All natural additive….“Sticky Sugar” that helps animals if they are exposed to salmonella or e-coli

How Do I Know What to Feed to Reach My Goal Before Fair?

Payback Feeds Swine Feeding Sheet

Hog Wt.

Days on Feed

# of Feed

50

1

12

3.00

75

13

24

3.75

100

25

36

4.50

125

37

48

5.00

150

49

60

5.75

175

61

72

6.25

200

73

84

6.50

225

85

96

6.75

250

97

108

7.00

 How Do I Figure ADG?

ADG= FINISH WEIGHT –CURRENT WEIGHT / DAYS UNTIL SHOW

Where to Start With ADG

Projections

Desired Weigh at the fair-

Starting Weight-

Pounds needed of gain-

Days to fair-

ADG-

ADG Example

  • Market Hog
  • 280# target wt‐ 70# current wt= 210# gain
  • 90 days to the fair
  • 210#/ 90 days = 2.3# of gain per day

Feeding for the Show

  • Grains-whole, ground and rolled-Corn, Oats, Barley
  • Protein-SBM, canola, DDG
  • Fat-Vegetable oil, DDG,

Rice Bran

Swine Feeding Option

  • Self Feeders‐ check them out daily to make sure the feed is flowing through them
  • Hand feeding‐ feed pans

What Tools Will You Need to Have?

  •  Feed
  • Scales
  • Feed sheets
  • Feed bunks/ buckets
  • Weigh tapes
  • Shelter
  • Water source
  • Patience and attention

Swine Management

  •  Feed
  • Give pigs free choice of feed
  • Feed intake can be limited to control gain
  • Water
  • Fresh and Cool
  • Housing
  • Provide Plenty of Shade
  • Vaccination
  • Worm Pigs that are Living in Dirt Pens

PEDV

  •  Virus (causes diarrhea), very contagious and will be harder on younger pigs worse than older pigs
  • Keep pens clean and dry
  • Bio Security‐ be clean
  • Clean boots, hands, anything that has manure on it

Animals Will Go Off of Feed

  •  Animals tend to go off feed if:
  • No water is available to drink or the water is frozen, too hot or dirty
  • They are sick
  • They are stressed
  • Animals may not reach a desired level of performance:
  • Stress such as washing, or training at the heat/cold of the day
  • Less than optimum genetics
  • The animal needs to be de-wormed
  • No preventative health program has been implemented

For the Best Success…

  •  Choose an animal that is at the proper weight and age for the targeted date of the show.
  • Provide clean, cool water at all times.
  • Feed at least 2X a day on a regular schedule. Feed by weight and not volume! If self-feeding, never let the feeder run empty and keep it clean of bad feed and foreign material.
  • Work with animals during the comfortable time of day for the animal.
  • Provide adequate shade and wind protection for animals and if needed keep them dry/wet depending on conditions.
  • Provide a health program along with a de-worming program.

Feeding for the Purple Ribbon

  •  Keep your feed consistent
  • Management
  • Outline your goals and objectives when starting your project so you know what you want to achieve

Good Luck

  •  Work hard
  • Enjoy your project
  • Having fun doing your work, it is not work
  • Try to do better than you did last year
  • Thank your parents and your leaders for the opportunity to be in 4H!

Thank You

Crystal White

(406) 690-3066

crystal.white@chsinc.com

Hog Biosecurity Information Sheet

Printable version of A Champion's Guide to Youth Swine Exhitition: Biosecurity and Your Pig Project (PDF) 

A Champion’s Guide to Youth Swine Exhibition: Biosecurity and Your Pig Project

pork.org | 800-456-PORK

aasv.org | 515-465-5255

2

Did you know that regardless of how many pigs you care for, whether it’s

a single show pig or thousands of market hogs, you are part of the pork

industry? And, just as you are responsible for keeping your show pig or

pigs healthy, you share the responsibility of keeping all of the pigs in the

United States healthy as well.

A healthy swine herd starts with raising healthy pigs at home. And

raising a healthy pig starts with biosecurity.

Bi - o - se – cu- ri- ty (bahy-oh-si-kyoor-i-tee)

Precautions taken to minimize the risk of introducing • an infectious

disease into an animal population. Source: United States Department

of Agriculture

  • Any of the policies and measures taken for protecting a nation’s

food supply and agricultural resources. Source: Webster’s New

Millennium™ Dictionary of English, Preview Edition (v 0.9.7)

  • The set of preventative measures taken to reduce the risk of disease

Biosecurity begins when you purchase your pigs and is a continuous

process. It involves preventing people, equipment or other animals from

spreading disease to your pigs. For example, you can prevent disease

from spreading by using clean, farm-specific clothes and boots when

working with your animals. Disease can also be prevented by cleaning,

disinfecting and allowing vehicles and show equipment to dry after a

show; and finally, disease can be prevented by isolating animals that

have just been purchased or that are coming back from a show.

This booklet is intended for youth exhibitors of all ages and levels of

experience. In it, you will find recommended biosecurity guidelines to

follow at your farm and when taking pigs to exhibitions.

Remember that your pigs have a better chance of remaining healthy if you

work closely with a veterinarian. A veterinarian can help you adapt the

biosecurity guidelines to the type of production system you have at home

and to the diseases in your area.

In this booklet you also will find a brief description of swine diseases

that you should be familiar with. Discuss this information with your

veterinarian and make sure you understand the routes of transmission

and clinical signs, as well as some ways you can prevent these diseases

in your pigs. If your pigs do get sick, your veterinarian can accurately

diagnose and treat the disease. Following a good biosecurity program is

the best way to control the spread of disease.

Swine Health Biosecurity Control Points:

Consult with your veterinarian to control diseases on your farm and at the swine exhibition. An

ongoing relationship with your swine herd veterinarian is an important part of a good swine

exhibition project. Developing and maintaining a herd biosecurity program is crucial as you work to

control diseases on your farm and to prevent disease transmission as pigs are commingled during

swine exhibitions. Consult with your veterinarian before you enter an exhibition, in order to develop a

vaccination protocol and biosecurity plan specific to your pigs. Continue to discuss any disease problems

or production losses with your veterinarian as you move forward with a biosecurity plan.

Isolation of incoming pigs or pigs returning from a fair or show provides protection against

any new additions to your swine herd. It is important to remember that direct contact between

infected and uninfected pigs is the easiest way to spread disease.

The Sanitation Process Cleaning:

This process involves removing all dirt and manure from

equipment. It is an important step in the overall sanitation process,

because some disinfectant products can be used up or inactivated by

dirt and manure. Hot water and detergents, similar to those used for

dish washing, may make cleaning much easier.

Disinfection:

Disinfectant products are chemical agents that

inactivate or kill pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses, and should be

used only when all visible manure and dirt have been removed. Proper

disinfection reduces the number of pathogens which, in turn, helps to

decrease the risk of infectious disease transmission. Commonly used

disinfectant products can be purchased at a farm supply store. Always

consult the disinfectant label claims regarding proper dilution and

contact times and be sure to work with your veterinarian to make a

decision on which product will work best for your situation.

Drying:

Drying is crucial to the process of equipment cleaning because drying kills many infectious

organisms. Without including a drying step in your cleaning process, the risk of allowing infection to

survive and multiply may increase. Isolation of incoming pigs or pigs returning from a fair or show

provides protection against spread of disease. In addition, isolation allows time for producers to watch

new or returning pigs for signs of disease before those animals enter into your swine herd. Isolation

gives producers the opportunity to test pigs to make sure that they are disease-free and to vaccinate those

animals against diseases that are already in a herd. Consult with your veterinarian to

determine an appropriate isolation strategy for your pigs.

Clean and disinfect all clothing and equipment associated with a swine exhibit before exposing the

same clothing and equipment to a “home herd”. Contact with livestock equipment can expose project

pigs to many types of infectious diseases. Following the exhibition, it is important that all clothing and

equipment associated with the show be cleaned and disinfected. The exhibitor should also be sure

to thoroughly wash his/her hands and arms in warm, soapy water and should shower before coming into

contact with pigs at the home farm. Clothing can simply be washed, but all equipment needs to undergo a

more thorough cleaning process. This procedure should take place in an area that is completely separate

from the home swine herd, to avoid indirect transmission of a pathogen.

The sanitation process should include the cleaning and disinfection process found on page 3.

Minimize the contact between visitors and your swine herd or show pigs. Since people can

transfer infection from their body and/or clothing, to your pigs, limit visitors to only those who have a

reason to be there. Always make sure that visitors wear clean boots and clothing when they are around

your pigs and that they only visit your farm when you are present.

Control birds, wildlife, and rodents that may have exposure to your swine herd and exhibit

swine. Control of birds, wildlife, and rodents is an important part of your biosecurity plan because

infection can be transmitted by these pests. Actions that help control such pests include

controlling the vegetation within and surrounding the unit, cleaning up any feed spills, getting rid of

any debris that may have accumulated on your farm, and removal of dead pigs.

Locate your swine facility at a distance from unrelated swine operations. Aerosol spread of

pathogens has been reported to occur approximately 2 miles around an infected farm. When

possible, locating your facility at least 2 miles from other swine can minimize the risk of infection

through the air.

Minimize employee contact with unrelated swine operations.

Diseases can be transferred from herd to herd by people. Farm

employees can carry bacteria or viruses on their body and/or clothing. It is important to discuss

with any employees or people working with your swine project or herd about what other animals

they have had exposure to in the last week and to talk to them about the potential for disease transmission.

Just as you would be concerned about your pigs being in contact with other pigs, you also should be

concerned about your pigs’ exposure to humans that may have had contact with other swine.

Dispose of swine carcasses in a timely manner, according to state regulations and biosecurity

protocols. In spite of your very best efforts, swine will, at times, die as a result of injury, disease or other

factors. Management of dead pigs is an extremely important aspect of swine production. There are many

different options for the disposal of these carcasses. They include rendering, burial, incineration and

composting. Check with your local animal health officials to determine which method(s) is/are approved for use in your state. Regardless of what that choice may be, keep in mind that disposing of carcasses in a timely manner is important to decrease pest problems associated with the carcass. ∙∙ Incineration: use of a heatgenerating

incinerator to break down swine carcasses. 

Rendering: a process that gives a producer the chance to create

a recyclable feed product by submitting the carcasses to a rendering company.

∙∙ Composting: the process of placing carcasses in layers with a carbon source to allow the natural decomposition process to break down the carcass.

Ensure that any purchased or delivered semen or breeding animals of any sort are the product of “minimal disease” animals. Some infectious diseases can be spread by the process of breeding. When making decisions

involving pig breeding, remember to take into account the health status of the semen-donating or

natural servicing boar and the sow.

Decrease the amount of on-farm traffic by controlling the flow of supply and product deliveries.

Vehicles have the potential to carry infection onto your farm. Because on-farm traffic and product

deliveries are a reality for most producers, it is important to control the areas to which such vehicles

have access. This can be done by designating a specific area for off-farm traffic and attempting to

make such an area one that is not closely associated with your swine herd or projects.

Purchasing Your Swine Project Every exhibitor is looking for the next champion pig. It is important to begin that search by not only evaluating your potential show pigs, but also the person who is providing the pigs.

The performance and health history of the source herd, the facilities in which the pigs are

housed, and the involvement of a veterinarian with the herd are good places to start that evaluation.

You and Your Veterinarian As you complete the process of selecting and acquiring your show

pig, it is important to keep in mind that you also should be working on developing a relationship with

a veterinarian. Before you bring a newly purchased pig to your farm, you and your veterinarian

should have a biosecurity plan in place. A veterinarian is a valuable and important resource for the

development of this plan that he/ she will develop specifically for your operation.

If this is not the only pig arriving at your farm or if you plan to ship pigs on and off of your farm in the

future, plan ahead for your purchase by creating an isolation area for new additions and pigs returning

to your swine herd. The location of this site will vary from farm to farm, but should be remote from

the rest of your herd. Your new pigs should spend a period of time in this isolation area before entering or

re-entering your herd. Important Questions to Ask Information about the performance

of the source herd is helpful as you determine the potential show-ring success of an animal, in addition to

providing insight into the overall health status of the swine herd. A history of high-performing animals

indicates that disease has not been a major problem for the swine herd. The history of a source herd has

serious implications on the future of both your project and your home swine herd. Biosecurity for your Project

The facilities in which your potential show pigs are currently housed will give you a good indication of what diseases they may have been exposed to. When you visit the source farm, look around and ask questions such as

the following: 7 Purchase Do you have a biosecurity

p 1.lan currently in place?

  1. Do you have a herd veterinarian?
  2. Have your pigs experienced any disease problems or production

losses in the past six months?

  1. Have you had to call a veterinarian to your farm for any reason,

other than for a routine visit, over the course of the last six months?

  1. How many pigs have you sold for exhibition purposes?
  2. How well have the pigs you have previously sold performed?
  3. Do you require that pigs entering your herd go through a period

of isolation?

  1. What is the vaccination history of this herd?
  2. Has this animal left this farm for any reason?
  3. Where are pigs entering your herd held for a period of isolation?
  4. Do pigs spend their entire lives in this one site or are they moved

to different sites?

  1. What is your pest control program like?

While you are looking at the swine facilities, be sure to notice such things as the maintenance and upkeep of the farm. Are the equipment and facilities in good working order? Is the grass cut and are the weeds

properly managed? Is there evidence of rodent infestation? Are rodent traps present and maintained?

Preparing for a Swine Exhibition After bringing your show pig home, work with a veterinarian to

establish an appropriate vaccination program that considers the diseases in your area and the vaccinations those pigs have already received. Make sure you and your veterinarian establish a biosecurity

protocol for your herd as well. Before entering a pig in a show or fair, it is important that you take actions to protect that animal and your home swine herd from the spread of infectious disease.

Ensure, before leaving for an event, that all fair animals have been vaccinated according to the veterinarian’s recommendations and any requirements of the show that you will be attending. It is important

to follow the herd biosecurity program you developed with the help of your veterinarian as you prepare your show pigs for competition. A more complete description of items to be included in your biosecurity

protocol can be found in the section, Swine Health. Every show, county, and state has different requirements for swine

exhibitors and their pigs. Before you attend a show, be sure to complete all tests required by that show, county

or state. Make sure to properly complete and submit any required paperwork in a timely manner.

Before you leave your farm with your swine project for a show, be sure to clean and disinfect all transportation

and show-related equipment. Remember that these items have the ability to transmit disease to and

from other pigs. Finally, never bring an animal to a show, fair, or exhibition that is not healthy. Take special care to

thoroughly evaluate your pigs on a daily basis, before leaving for a show.

Leave any unhealthy pigs behind and contact your veterinarian with any health concerns. If it appears that your herd is

experiencing a disease outbreak, it may be possible for your pigs to infect other animals. Even though your pigs may not appear sick, they could still be contagious. Discuss your concern with your veterinarian and together decide

if you and your pigs should attend the show. Always be considerate of protecting the health of all the

animals at the show. At the Show While you are at a swine show, fair, or exhibition, it is very important

to continue to act in a way that will decrease the spread of infectious disease. Because the best way to spread disease is by direct contact with other hogs, the best way to prevent this spread is to decrease any

unnecessary contact with unrelated swine during the exhibition. In addition, decrease unnecessary contact with manure from other animals that are at the event and with the general public present at the show.

Remember to follow the same strict biosecurity protocol while you are at the exhibition as you

would at home. Refrain from sharing equipment with other exhibitors or using equipment that

has come in contact with other swine. Thoroughly wash your hand, arms and any part of your

body that came in contact with pigs with warm, soapy water. Ultimately, it is important to

recognize the vital roles that swine exhibitors play in stopping disease transmission among all

pigs. Work to protect your show pigs and any other pigs from infection by incorporating exhibit

biosecurity safeguards into your overall biosecurity program. Be sure to contact show officials to ask

about any existing show protocols and work with your veterinarian to develop a plan specific to your

operation. Returning Home Adhering to a biosecurity protocol

when you return from a swine show is extremely important. Before returning to work with your home

swine herd, be sure to clean and disinfect all transportation and show-related equipment.

It is also very important that all swine taken to an exhibition be isolated from the rest of the herd

upon return to your home farm. Work with your herd veterinarian to develop a biosecurity program

that addresses the site and length of isolation. The best way to avoid the risk of transmitting an infectious disease

by way of a returning show pig is to limit your participation to terminal shows. A great deal of swine shows are terminal and significantly reduce the risk of disease transmission to a home

swine herd. As you begin to competitively show swine, it is important to fully appreciate the responsibility

that you have as a part of the swine industry. Controlling swine disease is the duty of each member

of our industry. Swine Diseases to Note: The following swine diseases are commonly associated with the

commingling of pigs at swine exhibition events. Disease descriptions have been included in order to provide a framework for disease identification and associated clinical signs. It is important that you

remember that the health status of your herd may change at any time. If you notice any health problems in your pigs, be sure to contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. If you notice any health problems in your

pigs, be sure to contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your veterinarian will work with you to develop a treatment schedule.

Glossary

Breeding stock: boars, gilts and/or sows that are involved in swine reproduction and provide the foundation of a swine herd.

Pre-weaned pigs: pigs that have not yet been taken from the sow.

Finishing pigs: pigs that are in the last stage of the swine production cycle and will continue to be fed until they are

ready to be taken to harvest.

Fomite: any inanimate object or substance capable of carrying infection. Has the ability to transfer infection from one pig to another pig. In the case of a swine operation, fomites may be clothing, boots, vehicles, etc.

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS)

Disease Details

PRRS is a major problem for the swine industry, and, in 2005, was estimated to cost the industry nearly $560 million per year.

Clinical Signs

PRRS is a viral disease that causes a variety of problems in the swine herd. PRRS may cause high abortion rates in breeding stock, death in pre-weaned pigs, and respiratory problems in finishing pigs.

Transmission

Direct transmission (pig-to-pig contact, aerosol, fecal-oral, and venereal), indirect transmission ( fomite contamination), and vector-borne transmission.

Prevention

The best way to prevent PRRS is to practice good biosecurity by quarantining new and returning stock and controlling

equipment, vehicle, and human traffic through your herd. A PRRS vaccination also is available and can be acquired from your local veterinarian.

Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases (PCVAD)

Disease Details

PCVAD have become some of the most significant viral diseases affecting the global swine herd.

Clinical Signs

Symptoms of PCVAD include respiratory, enteric, reproductive and a variety of other diseases.

Transmission

Direct, indirect, and vectorborne transmission (Note: It is extremely difficult to determine the extent of means of

transmission of PCVAD.)

Prevention

Limited pig-to-pig contact, decreased stress levels in your pigs, good hygiene, and good nutrition are the best ways to

prevent and control PCVAD. A vaccine also is available for prevention purpose and can be acquired through your

veterinarian.

Transmissible Gastro-enteritis (TGE)

Disease Details

TGE is a highly infectious disease that may appear in many forms, and can rapidly spread throughout

a herd.

Clinical Signs

Affected animals generally display signs of vomiting, diarrhea, and a lack of desire to eat.

Transmission

Direct transmission (fecal-oral), vector-borne transmission

Prevention

The most important preventative measures involved in managing TGE are biosecurity measures such as traffic and pest control. A vaccine is available for TGE prevention. If you notice any health problems in your pigs, be sure to

contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your veterinarian will work with you to develop a treatment schedule.

Swine Influenza Virus (SIV)

Disease Details

SIV is common in swine herds. It rarely causes disease in humans, but it can create new strains and infections.

Clinical Signs

When this virus enters a herd it is common to observe a rapid, explosive outbreak of respiratory disease. You may see coughing, pneumonia, fever and animals that are unwilling to eat.

Transmission

Direct transmission (pig-to-pig contact, human-to-pig contact, aerosol) and indirect transmission (fomites)

Prevention

Adhere to a strict biosecurity protocol, and reduce the exposure of your pigs to SIV. Don’t buy pigs from sources where SIV is active. Preventative vaccination is available from your veterinarian.

Note: Vaccinating your show pigs for influenza prior to exhibition also may reduce the potential for human illness.

If you notice any health problems in your pigs, be sure to contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your veterinarian will work with you to develop a treatment schedule.

Porcine Parvovirus (PPV)

Disease Details

PPV is a viral disease of pigs that is typically, when present in a swine herd, found in sows.

Clinical Signs

Associated with reproductive problems including abortion, small litters, stillbirths, neonatal deaths and weak piglets.

Generally, no noticeable disease occurs in non-pregnant pigs.

Transmission

Direct transmission (fecal-oral, venereal)

Prevention

Vaccinate gilts prior to breeding. Once a gilt is exposed to PPV, through vaccination, she will become immune. Use good

biosecurity measures.

Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

Disease Details

Hyopneumoniae is a bacterial infection that occurs throughout the world’s pig population, causing varied degrees of respiratory disease.

Clinical Signs

When it occurs as an infection by itself, it has only a mild effect on pigs. When co-infections such as PRRS, PCVAD, SIV, APP, or Haemophilusparasuisalso occur, the respiratory problems result in more serious effects on the infected pig.

Transmission

Direct transmission (pig-to-pig contact, aerosol)

Prevention

Adhere to a strict biosecurity protocol. Quarantine incoming or returning pigs and check to make sure that the herd from which you are purchasing is M. hyopneumoniae-free. Decrease stress levels in your pigs. M. hyopneumoniae vaccinations exist and are regularly used to control infection. 

Actinobacillus pleuro-pneumoniae (APP)

Disease Details

There are multiple strains of the bacterium APP. Some strains do not produce disease; others can

cause severe respiratory distress.

Clinical Signs

The signs of infection with a disease-causing strain of APP can range from severe respiratory difficulty to sudden death with a bloody nose.

Transmission

Direct transmission (pig-topig contact, aerosol), indirect transmission (fomites)

Prevention

Use a good biosecurity protocol. Quarantine new animals before they enter. Decrease the stress level in your herd.

An APP vaccine exists and can be obtained through your veterinarian.

Routes of Transmission:

Direct Transmission: the spread of disease from one host to another host. This type of disease transmission requires direct contact with an infected individual. There are several specific

types of direct transmission:

Contact Transmission ( ∙pig-to-pig): infection as a result of direct contact with an infected individual

∙∙ Aerosol/Droplet Transmission: exposure to airborne droplets from the eye, nose, or mouth and/or contaminated dust

∙∙ Fecal-Oral Transmission: ingestion of pathogens that originated in the digestive system

∙∙ Venereal Transmission: transmission as a result of breeding activity

Indirect Transmission: The spread of disease from host to host by means of a contaminated surface, such as a fomite.

Vector-borne Transmission: The spread of disease by means of an intermediate host animal who is capable of spreading the disease. A vector is typically an invertebrate animal, such as a mosquito or a tick.

©2007 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA This message funded by America’s Pork Checkoff program. #04827

National Pork Board, PO Box 9114, Des Moines, IA 50306

pork.org | 800-456-PORK

American Association of Swine Veterinarians

902 1st Avenue, Perry, IA 50220-1703 | aasv.org | 515-465-5255

References:

Frobose, D. 2001. Swine Resource Handbook for Market and Breeding Projects.

The Ohio State University Extension. 4-H Circular 134R

Indiana State Board of Animal Health. Biosecurity in Swine. Online.

http://www.in.gov/boah/biosecurity/swine.html. Accessed July 2007.

National Pork Board. Biosecurity Guide for Pork Producers. Online.

http://www.pork.org/PorkScience/Documents/final%20biosecurity%20book.pdf.

Accessed July 2007

Purdue Homeland Security Institute. National Biosecurity Resource Center for Animal

Health Emergencies. Online. http://www.biosecuritycenter.org/. Accessed July 2007.

Sanders, D. 2004. Blue Ribbon Guide to a Successful Swine Project.

© 2004 Donald E. Sanders

Shulaw, W. and Bowman, G. Biosecurity for Youth Livestock Exhibitors. The Ohio

State University Extension. Online. http://ohioline.osu.edu/vme-fact/pdf/0007.pdf.

Accessed July 2007.

Market Livestock Sale Committment Form

Printabe verstion of Market Livestock Sale Committment Form 2019-2020 (PDF)

4-H Market Livestock Sale Commitment

  1. Criteria for members to participate in all 4-H livestock projects are as follows:
    • Be in good standing with their club.
      • “good standing” = “in compliance with club by-laws”
    • Comply with all educational expectations.
      • attend Livestock Quality Assurance Training (LQA/Seminar) & as required
      • have animal tagged & weighed by cut-off dates,
      • have current records for livestock and one other project before Aug. 1
      • turn-in all required paperwork (livestock commitment form, drug withdrawal form, buyer’s thank you forms,), and.
    • Must comply with age requirements.
      • Regardless of locality of livestock housing and/or feeding applications, as long as the 4-H member is at least 8yrs old by Oct. 1 of the project year (10yrs old for beef), and no older than 18yrs old or still in high school by Oct. 1 of the project year, they are eligible to participate.

 

  1. All members will attend Livestock Quality Assurance Training (LQA) training during their first registered year as a Junior member in the livestock project and again during their first registered year as a Senior member. LQA training is obtained by attending one of the species specific trainings given throughout the year.
    • In the event that a member receives a white ribbon in Market Class or if the animal is over or under weight at weigh-in, the member shall be required to attend LAQ again before re-enrolling in a market livestock project the following year and meet with the livestock committee of that species.

 

  1. All members are strongly encouraged to regularly attend livestock training events as offered throughout the program year; however, ALL 1st year market project members must attend a Livestock Quality Assurance Training (LQA) specific to their market species.
    • For ex: if you are new to beef this year, you must attend a beef LQA, even if you’ve completed lamb or hog projects during previous years. Anytime you’re working with a species for the first time, you must attend an educational training on that species.

 

  1. The Youth Livestock Program Commitment to Excellence & Drug Withdrawal forms must be signed and returned to the Flathead County Extension Office on or before August 1.

 

  1. A 4-H Project forms & Financial Journal (on market animal) must be completed to date (current) and checked off by your livestock leader or by Extension Office Staff before August 1st. Members will complete records on one other project and turn-in current records on both project to their club organizational leaders before Aug. 1. The club leader will update Extension office regarding both projects before Aug. 1.

 

  1. Project members are required to care for and feed their animals while housed and shown at the NWMT Fair until 6:00 p.m. on the last Sunday of the fair week.

 

  1. On the first Monday of the fair, livestock will be weighed in the Trade Center Building. If a project member is unable to be present with their own animal, arrangements should be made for someone else to take their animal across the scale.

 

  1. Except for in the event of extreme circumstances (and with prior-approval of the 4-H Agent) livestock project members must show their own animals in the Market Class and Showmanship Class in order to sell their animal at the Saturday Livestock Auction. Grand, Reserve, Purple, Blue and Red ribbons sell; white ribbons do not sell.

 

  1. All members are to follow a dress code when showing in Market Class and Showmanship Class of White Shirt and Black Pants.

 

  1. A sale fee must be paid to the Kalispell Chamber of Commerce on weigh-in day at the sale fee table in the Trade Center, before your market animal can be officially weighed. Fee will be determined by the Kalispell Chamber of Commerce and documented in the NWMT Fair book.

 

  1. Lambs must weigh between 110 and 160 pounds. Hogs must weigh between 220 and 295 pounds. Beef must weigh between 1,050 and 1,550 pounds. Under or over weight animals are ineligible for the Market Class and will not be sold at the Market Livestock Auction.
    • Under/overweight animals may be shown in the showmanship class and in the feeder market class at the Fair.

 

  1. Members can tag up to two market animals in their project(s); however, only one of their tagged market animals can be taken to the fair. In all cases, members may tag up to 2 animals in their project. For example: 2 hogs, 2 sheep and/or 2 beef. But they will need to declare their primary and also their secondary animal on the ear tag form. For ex: If a family has 5 kids they are able to tag 2 hogs for each kid; however, if they cannot afford 2 for each, they can tag fewer. If they tag fewer, the kids will need to decide who is going to use which back-up hog.
    • Livestock records should be kept on each primary and back-up animal.

 

  1. Market livestock buyers must be contacted as soon as possible following the sale. At that time the official sale picture and a thank you gift should be presented to your buyer. The Thank You Documentation form must be signed by your buyer and returned to the Flathead County Extension Office by December 1.

 ***Continued participation in the market sale will be greatly influenced by the compliance of the above criteria.***

  I HAVE READ AND AGREE TO FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES OF THIS

MARKET LIVESTOCK SALE COMMITMENT FORM.

 

 

Project Member’s Printed Name                                                        Project Member’s Signature

Drug Withdrawal Form & Committment to Excellence Form

Printable version of Drug Withdrawal Form & Committment to Excellence Form 2019-2020 (PDF)

Youth Livestock Program Commitment to Excellence

Due Saturday, August 1st to Extension Office

 

  • I believe that participation in the Junior Livestock Program should demonstrate my own knowledge, ability, and skill as a feeder and exhibitor of livestock.

 

  • I will do my own work to the fullest extent and will only accept advice and support from others. This project is mine – it will not be done by another person in my place.

 

  • I will not use abusive, fraudulent, illegal, deceptive, or questionable practices in feeding, fitting and showing my animal(s), nor will I allow my parents, my project supervisor, or any other individual to employ such practices with my animal(s).

 

  • I will read, understand, and follow the rules without exception, of all livestock shows in which I am a participant, and ask that my parents and the supervisor of my project do the same.

 

  • I wish for my livestock project to be an example of how to accept what life has to offer, both good and bad, and how to live with the outcome.

 

  • I realize I am responsible for:
    • The proper care and safe, humane treatment of my animals.
    • The production of high quality, safe and wholesome food.
    • Demonstrating strong moral character as an example to others.

 

 

___________________________________________                __________________

Exhibitor’s Printed Name                                                             Phone#

 

 

___________________________________________                __________________

Exhibitor’s Signature                                                                    Date

 

 

___________________________________________                __________________

Project Supervisor OR Parent’s Signature                                   Date

 

These forms must be completed and signed by all parties on both sides and turned into the Extension Office by Saturday, August 1st

Over

Montana 4-H Livestock Drug Withdrawal Form

Due Saturday, August 1st to Extension Office

In regard to the use of animal health aids, growth promotants or other livestock substances,

I am aware that:

 

  • Chemical substances used in livestock production, disease prevention, or disease control have approved withdrawal times before slaughter;

 

  • Information on specific use and withdrawal times can be found on product label instructions for those drugs approved for use on livestock;

 

  • Tranquilizers and other non-approved substances are strictly prohibited for use on food animals;

 

  • Physically tampering with or altering an animal’s muscle tissue is not allowed.

 

Therefore, I certify that the animals I bring to this show have: (check one)

 

______ While in my ownership, never been given any substance which requires a withdrawal time before slaughter;

 

______ Complied with legal withdrawal times in the use of one or more approved chemical substances for animal health, growth promotion, or other livestock management practices and have never used a substance which is not approved for use on animals.

 

Any animals found with evidence of drug residues, evidence of physical tampering or evidence of administration of non-approved substances will be disqualified and dismissed from the Fairgrounds. I understand that a violation of approved usage of animal substances may be prosecuted and that such animals will be disqualified from further exhibition or sale. I further understand that if I am found in violation of these policies, I will forfeit and return all sales receipts and premiums to the sale committee and buyer(s). Further, I understand that ANY animal at the Fair is subject to comprehensive drug tests at the option of the show management. The Fair and its officers and management will not be held legally responsible for violation of these policies.

 

 

____________________________________________                    __________________

Exhibitor’s Printed Name                                                                   Phone#

 

____________________________________________                    __________________

Exhibitor’s Signature                                                                          Date

Over

 

 

____________________________________________                    __________________

Project Supervisor OR Parent’s Signature                                         Date

These forms must be completed and signed by all parties on both sides and turned into the Extension Office by Saturday, August 1st

Market Sale Flyer

Printable version of Market Sale Flyer 2020 (PDF)

Thank You to the following businesses and individuals for your purchases made at the 4-H/FFA Market Stock Sale at the

2019 NWMT Fair 4-H/FFA Market Sale Buyers List

406 Motors of Kalispell

Green Hyundai

Owl View Landing

Badger Excavating

Green Nissan

P.N.P.A.

Big Mountain Organics

Green Valley Sod

Parish Plumbing & Heating

Big Sky Antiques of Whitefish

GT Builders

Pavement Maintenance Solutions

Big Sky Pediatric Dentistry

Hammerquist  Casalegno

Pedersen & Co. Pumping, Inc.

Big Sky Rents

Hansen Excavating, Inc.

Pierce Manufacturing

Bigfork Dental Center

Happy’s Inn

Pioneer Heating & Cooling

Blaine Creek Grill

Harmon Crane

Ponderosa Farms

Brodehl Family

Heart & Hands Midwifery

RDO Equipment

Brooke Johnston/Montana Brooke Real Estate

Jance’s Body Shop

Riebe’s Machine

Buy Sell Montana Real Estate

JLM Services, LLC

Rob Giles Electric

Cherie Hansen/ReMax of Bigfork

John Dudis-Measure Law Firm

Robinson Sand & Gravel

Chick-fil-A

Kalispell Electric Inc.

Ron’s Alignment

CHS Mountain West Co-op

Kalispell Ford

Sandry Construction Co.

CityServiceValcon

Kalispell KIDDS

Sawbuck Pawn & Loan

CM Wiley Inc.

Kalispell Murdoch’s

Schellinger Construction

CMG Engineering

Kalispell Toyota

Schlegel Enterprises

Columbia Falls Murdoch’s

Kalispell Volkswagen

Schlegel Trucking

Converting Equipment International

Kirt Taylor Excavation

Siderius Construction

DA Davidson

LaSalle Equine & Livestock Clinic

Siderius Logging

Dan Siderius Logging

LeBlanc Family Trust

Sliters Lumber

Diamond Plumbing & Heating, Inc.

Leighty Brothers Construction

Smith Valley Shale

Dick Irvin, Inc.

Lemire & Company

Somer’s Bay Café

Doepker Ladscape, Inc.

Les Schwab Tire Center Street

Stebbins Dental Studio

Doni Marie’s Beauty Connection

Les Schwab Tire-Columbia Falls

Stebbins Orthodontics

Dr. Al Olszewski

Les Schwab Tire—Evergreen

Super 1 Foods of Flathead Valley

DSG

Les Schwab Tire—Whitefish

Superior Heating & Cooling, Inc.

Ed Hankinson Trucking

LHC Inc.

Susan Schmid CPA

Eisinger Honda

Lodgepole, Inc.

Swank Enterprises

Eisinger Motors

Loren’s Auto Repair

The Parlor Salon & Spa

Evergreen Liquor Store

Lower Valley Processing

Three Rivers Bank

Express Employment Professionals

M&C Tire

Thurston Orthodontics, PC

Family Law Flathead

McDonald’s/Jahnke Family

Tough Go Logging, Inc.

FH Stoltze Land & Lumber Co.

McManus Transport

Trail West Bank

First Interstate Bank-Kalispell

Michael C. Bowman DDS

Treweek Mini Storage

Flathead Electrical Co-op

Montana CAD

Universal Mechanical

Fraser Management

Montana Helical Piers

Urology Associates

Frontier Builders

MSU Culinary Service

Valley Bank

Gardner’s RV

Norm’s News/Western Outdoor

Vandevanter Meats/Montana Jerky Co.

Glacier Bank-Columbia Falls

North Forty Resort

Vertical Iron Works

Glacier Bank-Kalispell

Northstar Dental

Village Greens

Glacier Bank-Whitefish

Northwest Drywall & Roofing Supply

Water & Environmental Technologies

Glacier Dental Group

NorthWestern Energy

Western Building Center

Glacier Precast Concrete

Ogle Heating & Cooling

Weyerhaeuser

Glacier West Repair

Owens & Bray Trucking

Whitefish Credit Union

 

 

Wilkinson Construction

For further information and questions,

please contact:

4-H & FFA Market Livestock Sale

Kalispell Chamber

of Commerce

406-758-2806

j.cronk@kalispellchamber.com

Online Only: Details on Back

Saturday 8:00 a.m.

August 22, 2020

New!  Online bidding will be available this year through the generous support of Gardner Auction’s bidding platform.  Now you can bid online just like you would in person at the sale!  Online buyers must PRE-REGISTER in order to be able to bid during the auction itself.  Please go to the following link to register for online bidding:

SALE ORDER

Lamb - Beef - Hog

https://gardnerauction.hibid.com/catalog/226706/august-22--2020/

The Kalispell Chamber of Commerce will be providing more information in the coming weeks about this new online bidding platform and how you can be ready to bid from home, your phone, or wherever you may be online!

Sponsored by:

Kalispell Chamber

of Commerce

AGRI Business Committee

(Note virtual sale option on back)

YOU ARE INVITED

   You are invited to the Northwest Montana Fair 4-H/FFA Livestock Sale. The goal of this Sale is to invest in the future of agriculture through Flathead County 4-H and FFA youth; offering an educational experience in selecting, feeding, and marketing a finished product. The Sale is the final step in their livestock project where the educational marketing aspect truly comes to life. Businesses and individuals desiring to support our members and having an appreciation for top quality beef, pork, or lamb should consider becoming a buyer.

BUYER PARTICIPATION

   If possible, you will want to attend the sale in person. Auction committee members and ring volunteers will be on hand to assist with your purchase. If you or your firm cannot attend the sale but wish to participate, you can do so by proxy. Simply contact one of the Livestock Marketing Committee members at the Chamber office at 758-2804 and that person will make the purchase in your name.

WAYS TO BUY

1. Buyers will have their beef, sheep, or hog purchase butchered and graded following the sale. Your animal may then be processed at an establishment of your choice. A nominal charge will be assessed for the butchering, cutting, and wrapping. Friends and neighbors may share and purchase if a whole animal is more than you can use.  If you want part of an animal and have not found another person with whom to share it, contact the marketing committee. Someone there may be able to match you up with someone else who would like to share.

2. Organizations may purchase meat for a club barbecue or fund-raising activity. Purchased meat also may be donated to a favorite charity, 4-H Foundation or FFA Alumni. Part of your purchase may qualify for a tax deduction, check with your accountant.

3. Any buyer may consign his purchase for resale. The buyer then receives a rebate check for market price after animals are sold. Resale information will be provided at the start of the sale.

4. Sale committee will deliver animals to their appropriate destination. Live animals will be released to new owners  Sunday, August 23rd after 6 p.m.

5.     Buy online at https://gardnerauction.hibid.com/catalog/226706/august-22--2020/

AS A BUYER, YOU ARE

RESPONSIBLE FOR:

-Filling out the form at the Sale.

-Make sure you give the form to 4-H/FFA member   or sales personnel at the Sale.

-Having all buyer information on the form.

-Knowing where animal will be processed.

-Having check ready for members when they bring their picture and thank you to your business approximately two to four weeks after sale.

BUYERS REQUEST FORM (Please print)

 

4H/FFA Member

Name: _________________________________________________

Ear Tag Number____________________ Weight ______________

Sale Price______________________________________________

Beef     Hog     Lamb

Name of Individual

Buying: ________________________________________________

Company Buyer is purchasing for:

Business Name _________________________________________

Address_______________________________________________

City ____________________________ State ______Zip _______

Email:_________________________________________________

Phone_____________________

Resale                                   

Process By: (check one)

Lower Valley  Vandevanter Meats Beeman’s Proc.

Other ______________________________________________

 

Donation: If processed, buyer agrees to pay processing costs.

4-H Foundation         Imm. Luth. Home     Salvation Army

Brendan House          Kal. Comm. Kitchen  Samarit. House

CFalls Comm KitchenLuth. Bible Camp      Sparrow’s Nest

FFA Alumni                 Meals on Wheels      Veterans Home

Friendship House      Ray of Hope              Vet. Pantry

Heritage Place           Trinity School              Other

The Lighthouse             Somers Middle School

Ronald McDonald House-Missoula

Food Bank: (check you choice)

      Columbia Falls            Libby

      Flathead (serving: Kalispell, Evergreen, Martin City, Bigfork, Marion)

     Bigfork                          St. Matthews

      North Valley (serving: Whitefish, Stryker, Olney, Eureka)                       NW Veterans  West Shore (serving: Lakeside

 2020 4-H & FFA MARKET

LIVESTOCK SALE

What the Buyer Receives

BEEF

LIVEWEIGHT 1300 LBS.

CUTS                            LBS

T‑Bone/Rib Steak ................. 60

Sirloin s...................................15

Round/Tip Steak ....................50

Assorted Roasts ...................90

Ground Beef & Stew Meat ... 185

Soup Bone & Ribs ..................50

TOTALPRODUCT........450

 

PORK

LIVEWEIGHT 265 LBS.

CUTS                         LBS

Chops ................................. 15

Ham......................................30

Bacon ...................................18

Roast ....................................30

Spare Ribs .............................5

Sausage ................................15

TOTALPRODUCT....... 113

LAMB

LIVEWEIGHT 135 LBS.

CUTS                         LBS

Chop ..................................9

Leg ....................................12

Stew....................................6

Shank................................. 4

Ground ............................... 4

Ribs………………………………………..4

Shoulders……………………….11

TOTALPRODUCT..... 50

Estimated Average Sale Costs

BEEF

LIVE WEIGHT 1300 LBS.

 

Ave. $3.55/lb............$ 4,615.00

Slaughter .......................100.00

Cutting 70¢/lb ................910.00

FinishTotal..........$5,625.00

PORK

LIVE WEIGHT 265 LBS.

 

Ave. $6.75/lb..................... $1,788.75

Slaughter ...............................50.00

Cutting 70¢/lb ........................185.50

Curing 80¢/lb ........................49.20

FinishTotal................ $2,073.45

LAMB

LIVEWEIGHT 135 LBS.

 

Ave. $8.27/lb...................$1,116.45

Slaughter .............................50.00

Cutting/min. ea......................45.00

FinishTotal...............$1,211.45

What Happens If You Resell… (est.)

BEEF

LIVE WEIGHT 1300 LBS.

Ave. Costs $3.55/lb....... $4,615.00

Ave. Resell $1.10 ......... $1,430.00

ActualAnimal

Costto Buyer...........$3,185.00

PORK

LIVE WEIGHT 265 LBS.

Ave. Costs $6.75/lb........$1,788.75

Ave. Resell 65¢ ................$172.25

ActualAnimal

Costto Buyer..........$1,616.50

LAMB

LIVE WEIGHT 135 LBS.

Ave. Costs $8.27/lb......... $1,116.45

Ave. Resell $1.50 .............. $202.50

ActualAnimal

Costto Buyer...............$913.95

Market Carcass Results

Flathead County Steer of Merit 2020

Printable version of Flathead County Steer of Merit 2020 (PDF)

County: Flathead                                                      
                650 min 55.0 min .25 min   11.5 min                                
                950 max 68.0 max .60 max   17.5 max   <1 - 2.99     N     Ch- min   51.00 min            
Required Required Required Required Required Required   Required Required Required Required Required Required   Required   Required Required   Required Required   Required            
                                                         
Tag Exhibitor Breeder Breed Live Place Live Wt Base Price Half/Quarter HCW Dressing % Backfat KPH% REA REA/CWT Yield Gr YG Prem/Disc Maturity Dk Cutter DC Prem/Disc Marb Score Quality Gr QG Prem/Disc % Cutability SOM Price/cwt Carcass Val      
97 Brady Boll Two Creek Calves Club X Red 1,333 $180.39 Half 788 59.1 0.25 2.0 15.7 1.99 1.50 $3.86 A N $0.00 580 Ch 3.89 53.26 Y $188.14 $1,482.54      
96 Kimber Boll Two Creek Calves Club X Red 1,310 $180.39 Half 800 61.1 0.30 3.0 15.5 1.94 1.93 $3.86 A N $0.00 590 Ch 3.89 52.25 Y $188.14 $1,505.12   Marbling Scores
114 Nate Tutvedt OC Cattle Company Black Angus/Club 8-Blue 1,402 $180.39 Half 862 61.5 0.35 2.5 15.8 1.83 2.09 $1.82 A N $0.00 510 Ch 3.89 51.84 Y $186.10 $1,604.18   100 - 199 Practically Devoid
67 Jayla Wise Brad Finch/Sharron Matt Black Angus Red 1,429 $180.39 Half 932 65.2 0.25 3.0 15.9 1.71 2.18 $1.82 A N $0.00 570 Ch 3.89 51.61 Y $186.10 $1,734.45   200 - 299 Traces
76 Ione Plummer Bethany Lyford Black Angus Blue 1,239 $180.39 Half 742 59.9 0.30 2.0 13.0 1.75 2.31 $1.82 A N $0.00 580 Ch 3.89 51.40 Y $186.10 $1,380.86   300 - 399 Slight
95 Chloe Ervin Kimberly Lowry Maine/Red Angus Red 1120 $180.39 Half 688 61.4 0.40 3.0 13.70 1.99 2.33 $1.82 A N $0.00 570 Ch 3.89 51.38 Y $186.10 $1,280.37   400 - 499 Small
98 Hannah Boll Two Creek Calves Club X Red 1,206 $180.39 Half 768 63.7 0.40 3.0 14.6 1.90 2.35 $1.82 A N $0.00 520 Ch 3.89 51.30 Y $186.10 $1,429.25   500 - 599 Modest
64 Hannah Stolfus OC Cattle Company Semmintal/Club Red 1,267 $180.39 Half 774 61.1 0.25 3.0 13.5 1.74 2.35 $1.82 A N $0.00 580 Ch 3.89 51.30 Y $186.10 $1,440.41   600 - 699 Moderate
94 Emma Ervin Kimberly Lowry Maine/Bk Angus Red 1330 $180.39 Half 810 60.9 0.35 2.5 14.10 1.74 2.44 $1.82 A N $0.00 590 Ch 3.89 51.06 Y $186.10 $1,507.41   700 - 799 Slightly Abundant
75 Hayden Hansen Mark Passmore Club Calf Reserve 1,416 $180.39 Half 878 62.0 0.30 1.5 16.5 1.88 1.61 $3.86 A N $0.00 420 Ch- 0.00 52.96 Y $184.25 $1,617.72   800 - 899 Moderately Abundant
74 Harli Hansen Mark Passmore Club Calf 3-Blue 1,360 $180.39 Half 872 64.1 0.30 2.0 16.7 1.92 1.62 $3.86 A N $0.00 470 Ch- 0.00 52.93 Y $184.25 $1,606.66   900 - 999 Abundant
56 Taften Erickson Cobb Charolois Charolais Red 1,253 $180.39 Half 758 60.5 0.30 2.5 15.4 2.03 1.70 $3.86 A N $0.00 470 Ch- 0.00 52.80 Y $184.25 $1,396.62      
85 Carson Parish Mark Passmore Semmintal X 9-Blue 1225 $180.39 Half 742 60.6 0.25 2.5 13.70 1.85 2.06 $1.82 A N $0.00 440 Ch- 0.00 51.98 Y $182.21 $1,352.00      
73 Wyatt White Mark Passmore Black Angus Red 1,189 $180.39 Half 724 60.9 0.30 1.5 12.5 1.73 2.30 $1.82 A N $0.00 440 Ch- 0.00 51.43 Y $182.21 $1,319.20   Grid Pricing $/CWT
57 Chase Olson Cobb Charolois Charolais Red 1,403 $180.39 Half 862 61.4 0.30 3.0 14.8 1.72 2.39 $1.82 A N $0.00 480 Ch- 0.00 51.16 Y $182.21 $1,570.65      
82 Dillon Muth Mark Passmore Simmetal/Blk Angus Blue 1428 $180.39 Half 868 60.8 3.0 17.20 1.98 1.39 $3.86 A N $0.00 520 Ch 3.89 53.45 $188.14 $1,633.06   Base Price $180.39
106 Timber McCracken Dusty Young Charolais/Blk Angus 4-Blue 1,444 $180.39 Half 914 63.3 0.25 2.5 1.95 1.40 $3.86 A N $0.00 520 Ch 3.89 53.41 $188.14 $1,719.60      
59 Bailey Hewitt Cobb Charolois Charolais Blue 1,416 $180.39 Half 932 65.8 3.0 16.1 1.73 1.86 $3.86 A N $0.00 550 Ch 3.89 52.33 $188.14 $1,753.46   Yield Grade Premium/Discount
61 Grace Stolfus Rolling C Ranch Black Angus X Red 1,378 $180.39 Half 858 62.3 0.35 3.0 14.3 1.67 2.66 $1.82 A N $0.00 590 Ch 3.89 $186.10 $1,596.74   1 $3.86
50 Gabriella Johnson Wayne Schlat Maine Anjou X Blue 1,392 $180.39 Half 854 61.4 0.60 3.0 15.3 1.79 2.95 $1.82 A N $0.00 550 Ch 3.89 $186.10 $1,589.29   2 $1.82
80 Noah Buckwalter Lowry Blk Angus/Maine Red 1,229 $180.39 Half 748 60.9 0.50 2.5 12.2 1.63 $0.00 A N $0.00 580 Ch 3.89 $184.28 $1,378.41   3 $0.00
90 Bryor Hankinson Brad Finch/Sharron Matt Black Angus Red 1,398 $180.39 Half 878 62.8 0.30 3.0 12.5 1.42 $0.00 A N $0.00 530 Ch 3.89 $184.28 $1,617.98   4 ($11.21)
130 Carly Tranel Ross Williams Black Angus Red 1,256 $180.39 Half 776 61.8 0.45 2.5 11.7 1.51 $0.00 A N $0.00 570 Ch 3.89 $184.28 $1,430.01   5 ($17.79)
72 Wyatt Daken Cody Morgan Black Angus Red 1,328 $180.39 Half 846 63.7 2.5 14.7 1.74 $0.00 A N $0.00 590 Ch 3.89 $184.28 $1,559.01      
89 Kathryn Lillie Curt Mculln Red Angus Red 1,163 $180.39 Half 742 63.8 2.0 11.6 1.56 $0.00 A N $0.00 580 Ch 3.89 $184.28 $1,367.36   Quality Grade Premium/Discount
62 Evan Heupel Roger Trang Black Angus Red 1369 $180.39 Half 828 60.5 2.5 12.20 1.47 $0.00 A N $0.00 590 Ch 3.89 $184.28 $1,525.84   Prime $12.77
77 Maddie Sutton Mark Passmore Semmintal X Grand 1,423 $180.39 Half 934 65.6 0.25 2.0 1.98 1.15 $3.86 A N $0.00 420 Ch- 0.00 53.97 $184.25 $1,720.90   Ch +/ Ch 0 $3.89
63 Faith Cheff Two Creek Calves Red Angus X Red 1114 $180.39 Half 660 59.2 2.0 14.10 2.14 1.40 $3.86 A N $0.00 430 Ch- 0.00 53.56 $184.25 $1,216.05   Ch - $0.00
83 Dawson Muth Mark Passmore Simmetal/Blk Angus Blue 1,124 $180.39 Half 668 59.4 1.5 12.9 1.93 1.71 $3.86 A N $0.00 420 Ch- 0.00 52.82 $184.25 $1,230.79   Se +/ Se - ($19.00)
103 Keagan McCracken Dusty Young Charolais/Blk Angus Blue 1,386 $180.39 Half 856 61.8 2.5 14.9 1.74 1.98 $3.86 A N $0.00 440 Ch- 0.00 52.09 $184.25 $1,577.18   St ($31.47)
101 Samuel McLean Dusty Young Charolais/Blk Angus Red 1,147 $180.39 Half 694 60.5 2.0 12.6 1.82 2.01 $1.82 A N $0.00 440 Ch- 0.00 52.13 $182.21 $1,264.54      
109 Hayden Braaten Two Creek Calves Blk Angus X Red 1,353 $180.39 Half 754 55.7 2.0 12.9 1.71 2.14 $1.82 A N $0.00 430 Ch- 0.00 51.79 $182.21 $1,373.86   Dark Cutter Premium/Discount
79 Sam Plummer Bethany Lyford Charolais 5-Blue 1,418 $180.39 Half 930 65.6 2.5 15.3 1.65 2.14 $1.82 A N $0.00 480 Ch- 0.00 51.70 $182.21 $1,694.55   Y ($35.71)
99 Elizabeth Dull Terry Kellog Charolais Red 1,433 $180.39 Half 882 61.5 3.0 14.5 1.64 2.31 $1.82 A N $0.00 430 Ch- 0.00 51.33 $182.21 $1,607.09   N $0.00
100 Isaiah McLean Dusty Young Charolais/Blk Angus Red 1,131 $180.39 Half 674 59.6 2.0 1.66 2.38 $1.82 A N $0.00 430 Ch- 0.00 51.28 $182.21 $1,228.10      
87 Matt Glimm Brad Finch/Sharron Matt Black Angus Red 1,434 $180.39 Half 880 61.4 0.35 3.0 15.0 1.70 2.52 $1.82 A N $0.00 450 Ch- 0.00 $182.21 $1,603.45      
110 Brooklyn Young Young Ranch Black Angus Red 1,378 $180.39 Half 772 56.0 0.40 2.5 13.5 1.75 2.61 $1.82 A N $0.00 420 Ch- 0.00 $182.21 $1,406.66      
108 Garret Braaten Two Creek Calves Blk Angus X Red 1,317 $180.39 Half 738 56.0 0.30 2.0 11.7 1.59 2.71 $1.82 A N $0.00 450 Ch- 0.00 $182.21 $1,344.71      
86 Rylee Glimm Brad Finch/Sharron Matt Black Angus Red 1,434 $180.39 Half 886 61.8 0.35 2.5 14.1 1.59 2.73 $1.82 A N $0.00 460 Ch- 0.00 $182.21 $1,614.38      
104 Takeylie McCracken Dusty Young Charolais/Blk Angus Red 1,422 $180.39 Half 880 61.9 0.35 2.5 13.9 1.58 2.77 $1.82 A N $0.00 470 Ch- 0.00 $182.21 $1,603.45      
81 Kali Brubaker Two Creek Calves Black Angus 6-Blue 1,304 $180.39 Half 806 61.8 0.50 3.0 14.4 1.79 2.80 $1.82 A N $0.00 490 Ch- 0.00 $182.21 $1,468.61      
113 Boe Tutvedt Rolling C Ranch Black Angus X Red 1,464 $180.39 Half 940 64.2 0.30 3.5 14.1 1.50 $0.00 A N $0.00 480 Ch- 0.00 $180.39 $1,695.67      
53 Dillon Jewett Jason Gall Charolais X 7-Blue 1409 $180.39 Half 884 62.7 0.60 3.5 15.30 1.73 $0.00 A N $0.00 460 Ch- 0.00 $180.39 $1,594.65      
58 Luke Heupel Roger Trang Black Angus Red 1,345 $180.39 Half 836 62.2 3.0 12.3 1.47 ($11.21) A N $0.00 620 Ch+ 3.89 $173.07 $1,446.87      
55 Reese McQuade Jay Scott Black Angus White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
65 Kaylana Pengelly Bill Bradburry Black Angus White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
66 Madison Wilson Guest Ranch LLC Blk Angus X White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
69 Cody Williamson Jay Scott Black Angus White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
71 Grace Holtmeyer Keith Davis Blk Angus/Baldy White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
88 Kiaunna Green Dan & Amie Warner Black Angus White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
93 Clay Gadeberg Rolling C Ranch Blk Angus X White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
111 Beth Young Young Ranch Black Angus White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      
112 Bowdrie Young Young Ranch Black Angus White   $180.39 Half #DIV/0!   #DIV/0! 2.50 $1.82 A N $0.00   #N/A 51.34 #DIV/0! #N/A #N/A      

 Statewide Certified Lamb Ultrasound Flathead County 2020

Printable version of Statewide Certified Lamb Ultrasound Flathead County 2020 (PFD)

Montana Certified Lamb Ultrasound Contest                
Ranked by: Number of contest criteria met then by estimated amount of boneless retail cuts (%BRC-muscle yield based on carcass weight, backfat, body wall thickness and loineye area).                
High: All 3 critieria met    Medium: 2/3 Criteria Met  Low: 1/3 Criteria Met                
          A macro has been created to auto sort - this can be accessed by pressing Ctrl-L                              
Rank Animal ID Exhibitor County Breeder Live Weight Est. Carcass Weight      12th-13th Rib           Ult. Measurements Calc Yield Grade Body Wall Thickness %BRC Contest Criteria: LEA/CWT in2                
    (Name, Town, State) Backfat Loineye Live Wt  Backfat Loin Eye Total                
First Name Last Name   (52% of LW) in. Area, in2 ≤ 110 BW ≤ 165 .15 ≥ FT ≥ .25 ≥ 2.5 in2                
  843 Jayne McLean Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 142 73.8 0.20 4.08 2.40 0.8 50.00 1 1 1 3 2.87                
  886 Alyssa Gerspach Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 124 64.5 0.19 3.64 2.30 0.8 49.75 1 1 1 3 2.94                
  863 Addyson Morris Flathead Cullis Family Flock, Ronan, MT 140 72.8 0.20 3.91 2.40 0.8 49.67 1 1 1 3 2.79                
  826 Ariah Thomas Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT 129 67.1 0.23 3.55 2.70 0.8 49.14 1 1 1 3 2.75                
  879 Kiel Guffin Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 132 68.6 0.15 3.35 1.90 0.8 48.86 1 1 1 3 2.54                
  860 Cole Roth Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 143 74.4 0.20 3.54 2.40 0.8 48.63 1 1 1 3 2.48                
  816 Rylee Bernier Flathead Cullis Family Flock, Ronan, MT 127 66.0 0.25 3.34 2.90 0.8 48.62 1 1 1 3 2.63                
  827 Ella Rauch Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT 133 69.2 0.22 3.38 2.60 0.8 48.59 1 1 1 3 2.54                
  841 Mckinley Bean Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 133 69.2 0.24 3.39 2.80 0.8 48.52 1 1 1 3 2.55                
  824 Hollie Estey Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT 122 63.4 0.18 3.08 2.20 0.8 48.51 1 1 1 3 2.52                
  845 Caroline Owen Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 136 70.7 0.19 3.31 2.30 0.8 48.41 1 1 1 3 2.43                
  868 Teagan Dixon Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 128 66.6 0.24 3.24 2.80 0.8 48.37 1 1 1 3 2.53                
  819 Bailey Lake Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 141 73.3 0.19 3.36 2.30 0.8 48.32 1 1 1 3 2.38                
  829 Anna Morrison Flathead Cullis Family Flock, Ronan, MT 117 60.8 0.19 2.88 2.30 0.8 48.19 1 1 1 3 2.46                
  835 Kaylee Fritz Flathead Chris Campbell, Corvalis, MT 136 70.7 0.24 3.29 2.80 0.8 48.14 1 1 1 3 2.42                
  846 Kaylei Fant Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 155 80.6 0.21 3.57 2.50 0.8 48.13 1 1 1 3 2.30                
  857 Marian Tuck Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 119 61.9 0.23 2.95 2.70 0.8 48.10 1 1 1 3 2.48                
  810 Shelby Tranel Flathead Isabelle Lowry, Helena, MT 133 69.2 0.19 3.11 2.30 0.8 48.05 1 1 1 3 2.34                
  811 Emma Braaten Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 136 70.7 0.25 3.27 2.90 0.8 48.05 1 1 1 3 2.40                
  844 Mary Owen Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 139 72.3 0.20 3.22 2.40 0.8 48.02 1 1 1 3 2.32                
  834 Miley Fritz Flathead Chris Campbell, Corvalis, MT 135 70.2 0.25 3.20 2.90 0.8 47.92 1 1 1 3 2.37                
  869 Billi Young Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 134 69.7 0.17 3.02 2.10 0.8 47.88 1 1 1 3 2.25                
  892 Lauren Woods Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 147 76.4 0.25 3.34 2.90 0.8 47.74 1 1 1 3 2.27                
  825 Katie Christensen Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT 143 74.4 0.15 3.03 1.90 0.8 47.59 1 1 1 3 2.12                
  872 Mia Guffin Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 146 75.9 0.25 3.21 2.90 0.8 47.46 1 1 1 3 2.20                
  830 Daniel Dixon Flathead Cullis Family Flock, Ronan, MT 141 73.3 0.20 3.03 2.40 0.8 47.46 1 1 1 3 2.15                
  859 Ben Roth Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 126 65.5 0.20 2.72 2.40 0.8 47.36 1 1 1 3 2.16                
  866 Macie Schreckendgust Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 139 72.3 0.19 2.91 2.30 0.8 47.30 1 1 1 3 2.09                
  899 Bodie Rudiger Flathead Morrison Family, Kalispell, MT 118 61.4 0.24 2.56 2.80 0.8 47.15 1 1 1 3 2.17                
  903 Sage Brockman Flathead Cullis Family Flock, Ronan, MT 137 71.2 0.23 2.86 2.70 0.8 47.09 1 1 1 3 2.09                
  910 Kailyn Stutzman Flathead Tim Stutzman, Kalispell, MT 145 75.4 0.21 2.95 2.50 0.8 47.04 1 1 1 3 2.03                
  884 Rayna Mercer Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 126 65.5 0.17 2.53 2.10 0.8 47.03 1 1 1 3 2.01                
  908 Zeke Stutzman Flathead Tim Stutzman, Kalispell, MT 138 71.8 0.22 2.82 2.60 0.8 46.99 1 1 1 3 2.04                
  828 Hailey Long Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT 133 69.2 0.14 3.39 1.80 0.8 48.96 1 0 1 2 2.55                
  900 William Morrison Flathead   112 58.2 0.13 2.87 1.70 0.8 48.65 1 0 1 2 2.56                
  861 Alexis Johnson Flathead Cullis Family Flock, Ronan, MT 131 68.1 0.30 3.49 3.40 0.8 48.59 1 0 1 2 2.66                
  906 Paige Morrison Flathead   122 63.4 0.11 2.98 1.50 0.8 48.57 1 0 1 2 2.44                
  885 Amber Jones Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 122 63.4 0.29 3.26 3.30 0.8 48.47 1 0 1 2 2.67                
  874 Ian Guffin Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 139 72.3 0.28 3.52 3.20 0.8 48.40 1 0 1 2 2.53                
  812 Teigen Braaten Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 142 73.8 0.29 3.53 3.30 0.8 48.25 1 0 1 2 2.49                
  882 Isabel Kerst Flathead Rule Club Lambs, Akron, CO 146 75.9 0.13 3.31 1.70 0.8 48.23 1 0 1 2 2.27                
  889 Madison Brist Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 120 62.4 0.14 2.80 1.80 0.8 48.08 1 0 1 2 2.33                
  842 Jubilee McLean Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 151 78.5 0.27 3.58 3.10 0.8 48.06 1 0 1 2 2.37                
  890 Addyson Reed Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 110 57.2 0.14 2.58 1.80 0.8 47.99 1 0 1 2 2.35                
  894 Isabella Moran Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 143 74.4 0.27 3.39 3.10 0.8 47.95 1 0 1 2 2.37                
  854 Peyton McQuade Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 118 61.4 0.28 2.91 3.20 0.8 47.83 1 0 1 2 2.47                
  847 Shelby Fant Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 147 76.4 0.29 3.35 3.30 0.8 47.59 1 0 1 2 2.28                
  813 Zayne Braaten Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 138 71.8 0.31 3.09 3.50 0.8 47.26 1 0 1 2 2.24                
  856 Annie Gross Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 145 75.4 0.31 3.21 3.50 0.8 47.25 1 0 1 2 2.21                
  875 Westin Daken Flathead   143 74.4 0.28 3.06 3.20 0.8 47.10 1 0 1 2 2.14                
  850 Manny Barone Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 149 77.5 0.29 3.17 3.30 0.8 47.06 1 0 1 2 2.13                
  864 Zoe Guffin Flathead Bailey Lake, Kalispell, MT 142 73.8 0.26 2.99 3.00 0.8 47.06 1 0 1 2 2.11                
  880 Walter Gardener Flathead Connie Mitchell, Kalispell, MT 141 73.3 0.37 3.03 4.10 0.8 46.72 1 0 1 2 2.15                
  896 Cara McQuade Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT 124 64.5 0.19 2.38 2.30 0.8 46.66 1 1 0 2 1.92                
  817 Dejana Ridens Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT   0.0     0.40 0.8 47.11 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
  818 Drezani Ridens Flathead Kalispell FFA, Kalispell, MT   0.0     0.40 0.8 47.11 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
  853 Reese McQuade Flathead Hilltop Club Lambs, Kalispell, MT   0.0     0.40 0.8 47.11 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
    Laila Sargen Flathead     0.0     0.40 1.8 43.58 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
        Flathead     0.0     0.40   49.94 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
        Flathead     0.0     0.40   49.94 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
        Flathead     0.0     0.40   49.94 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
        Flathead     0.0     0.40   49.94 0 0 0 0 #DIV/0!                
Group Averages:       135 70.1 0.21 3.33 2.50   48.43         2.48                
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
*54.127 Specifications for official U.S. standards for grades of carcass lamb, yearling mutton, and mutton (yield). The yield grade of an ovine carcass or side is determined on the basis of the adjusted fat thickness over the ribeye muscle between the 12th and 13th ribs. The adjusted fat thickness range for each yield grade is as follows: Yield Grade 1 -- 0.00 to 0.15 inch; Yield Grade 2 -- 0.16 to 0.25 inch; Yield Grade 3 -- 0.26 to 0.35 inch; Yield Grade 4 -- 0.36 to 0.45 inch; and Yield Grade 5 -- 0.46 inch and greater.                
               
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   

 Flathead County Symbol of Excellence 2020

Printable version of Flathead County Symbol of Excellence 2020 (PDF)

2020 Flathead Report                  
County Name ID Full Name Breeder Final Weight Calculated Carcass Weight Back Fat Loin Eye Area LEA adj to 250lbs Muslce in Total Criteria Met SOE
Flathead 424 Kinzey Davis   268 195.64 0.54 9.21 8.742 60.473 3 SOE
Flathead 615 Tristan Dugan   269 196.37 0.57 8.93 8.436 59.572 3 SOE
Flathead 650 Maggie Reddig   256 186.88 0.6 8.68 8.524 59.558 3 SOE
Flathead 785 Qunidy Gronley   240 175.2 0.67 8.15 8.41 58.694 3 SOE
Flathead 582 Rose Fisher   243 177.39 0.65 8.11 8.292 58.632 3 SOE
Flathead 619 Meeka Krueger   248 181.04 0.63 7.97 8.022 58.239 3 SOE
Flathead 357 Ilah McKenzie   250 182.5 0.49 7.32 7.32 58.18 3 SOE
Flathead 378 Haven Newton   266 194.18 0.71 8.76 8.344 58.06 3 SOE
Flathead 458 Cash   Hadley   241 175.93 0.7 8 8.234 57.981 3 SOE
Flathead 551 Renny Ottosen Big Sky Colony 271 197.83 0.5 7.77 7.224 57.845 3 SOE
Flathead 542 Kellan Manning   276 201.48 0.65 8.59 7.914 57.771 3 SOE
Flathead 673 Makenna Hartle   250 182.5 0.74 8.18 8.18 57.439 3 SOE
Flathead 366 Brookann Lauria   248 181.04 0.5 6.95 7.002 57.4 3 SOE
Flathead 612 Evelyn   Dowler   242 176.66 0.57 7.05 7.258 57.217 3 SOE
Flathead 740 Greg Williamson   262 191.26 0.71 8.23 7.918 57.205 3 SOE
Flathead 543 Katie Manning   277 202.21 0.68 8.27 7.568 56.828 3 SOE
Flathead 580 Sarah Fisher   254 185.42 0.71 7.77 7.666 56.668 3 SOE
Flathead 569 Laney Ervin   255 186.15 0.79 8.02 7.89 56.332 3 SOE
Flathead 780 Trevor Hagadone Elk Creek Colony 245 178.85 0.61 6.91 7.04 56.328 3 SOE
Flathead 432 Joselyn Mordja   273 199.29 0.74 8.2 7.602 56.32 3 SOE
Flathead 748 Miel Newton   267 194.91 0.8 8.27 7.828 56.166 3 SOE
Flathead 444 Kase Braaten   246 179.58 0.8 7.74 7.844 56.086 3 SOE
Flathead 664 Mckinlie Murer   272 198.56 0.65 7.59 7.018 56.025 3 SOE
Flathead 540 Sophia Ochenrider   264 192.72 0.74 7.81 7.446 55.966 3 SOE
Flathead 778 Tracy Hagadone Elk Creek Colony 253 184.69 0.58 6.75 6.672 55.898 3 SOE
Flathead 553 Jessa Morris Deaton Show Pigs 259 189.07 0.69 7.39 7.156 55.837 3 SOE
Flathead 515 Brooke Miner   258 188.34 0.78 7.64 7.432 55.503 3 SOE
Flathead 657 Naomi Becker   254 185.42 0.76 7.42 7.316 55.431 3 SOE
Flathead 534 Ryan Davidson   273 199.29 0.74 7.43 6.832 54.822 3 SOE
Flathead 435 Gracie Mordja   240 175.2 0.74 6.67 6.93 54.669 3 SOE
Flathead 416 Samantha Jones   254 185.42 0.71 6.81 6.706 54.661 3 SOE
Flathead 420 Joe   Karboski Elk Creek Colony 256 186.88 0.76 7.05 6.894 54.572 3 SOE
Flathead 524 Aiden DeLong   263 191.99 0.79 7.3 6.962 54.494 3 SOE
Flathead 622 Cruz Bartholomew   266 194.18 0.78 7.06 6.644 53.99 3 SOE
Flathead 760 Morgan Baker Deaton Show Pigs 232 169.36 0.54 8.28 8.748 60.947 2 MED
Flathead 513 Tristen Herd   220 160.6 0.58 7.96 8.74 60.648 2 MED
Flathead 768 Parker Strohschein   230 167.9 0.51 7.52 8.04 59.677 2 MED
Flathead 598 Charlie Ervin   237 173.01 0.69 8.49 8.828 59.429 2 MED
Flathead 667 Daniel Dorsett Jr MSU Extension 235 171.55 0.54 7.64 8.03 59.281 2 MED
Flathead 671 TJ   Hayek   228 166.44 0.57 7.22 7.792 58.443 2 MED
Flathead 749 Caius Daychild   250 182.5 0.82 8.88 8.88 58.104 2 MED
Flathead 767 Lauryn Siderius   250 182.5 0.87 9.11 9.11 58.079 2 MED
Flathead 675 Molly Sutherland   255 186.15 0.89 9.25 9.12 57.887 2 MED
Flathead 396 Cabella McIntyre Deaton Show Pigs 231 168.63 0.7 7.61 8.104 57.703 2 MED
Flathead 461 Piper Ten Eyck   289 210.97 0.74 8.62 7.606 56.393 2 MED
Flathead 411 Aiden Murphy   273 199.29 0.85 8.71 8.112 56.277 2 MED
Flathead 497 Brayton Fitch   277 202.21 0.87 8.61 7.908 55.719 2 MED
Flathead 437 Vanessa Mordja   234 170.82 0.67 6.61 7.026 55.583 2 MED
Flathead 610 Noah Dowler   222 162.06 0.6 5.99 6.718 55.552 2 MED
Flathead 660 Jordyn Greene   235 171.55 0.75 6.99 7.38 55.517 2 MED
Flathead 438 Bella Zemacke   294 214.62 0.76 8.23 7.086 55.298 2 MED
Flathead 655 Shelby Olsen   232 169.36 0.76 6.84 7.308 55.216 2 MED
Flathead 508 Morgan Piazzola   264 192.72 0.89 8.15 7.786 55.191 2 MED
Flathead 653 Austin Olson   244 178.12 0.86 7.54 7.696 55.12 2 MED
Flathead 737 Blayze McCracken   250 182.5 0.6 6.35 6.35 54.989 2 MED
Flathead 668 Jessica Hanson   275 200.75 0.85 7.94 7.29 54.699 2 MED
Flathead 579 Maggie Giffin   283 206.59 0.65 7.13 6.272 54.683 2 MED
Flathead 487 Piper Brockman Elk Creek Colony 278 202.94 0.63 6.93 6.202 54.683 2 MED
Flathead 792 Silas Martin   283 206.59 0.85 8.05 7.192 54.594 2 MED
Flathead 739 Teagan Flint   274 200.02 0.94 8.28 7.656 54.555 2 MED
Flathead 541 Michael   Manning   269 196.37 0.85 7.74 7.246 54.549 2 MED
Flathead 676 Raney Sutherland   264 192.72 0.99 8.3 7.936 54.52 2 MED
Flathead 402 Madysen Martin   275 200.75 0.83 7.7 7.05 54.422 2 MED
Flathead 479 Fisher Sliter Elk Creek Colony 260 189.8 0.83 7.31 7.05 54.244 2 MED
Flathead 446 Aaron Pheifer   240 175.2 0.81 6.79 7.05 54.186 2 MED
Flathead 600 Wyatt Hewitt   282 205.86 0.74 7.23 6.398 54.09 2 MED
Flathead 766 Trey Rice   225 164.25 0.74 6.11 6.76 54.079 2 MED
Flathead 592 Henry Orem   244 178.12 0.83 6.86 7.016 53.956 2 MED
Flathead 544 Beau Siderius   264 192.72 0.75 6.85 6.486 53.937 2 MED
Flathead 391 Coben Diede   259 189.07 1.01 8.01 7.776 53.936 2 MED
Flathead 469 Isaac Blasdel Big Sky Colony 255 186.15 0.62 6 5.87 53.837 2 MED
Flathead 412 Ethan Bay   272 198.56 0.92 7.76 7.188 53.808 2 MED
Flathead 480 Aubree Gerber Elk Creek Colony 270 197.1 0.6 6.17 5.65 53.799 2 MED
Flathead 442 Coy   Braaten   278 202.94 0.87 7.62 6.892 53.784 2 MED
Flathead 395 Jayden McIntyre Deaton Show Pigs 249 181.77 0.83 6.87 6.896 53.771 2 MED
Flathead 379 Joshua Broughton   261 190.53 0.85 7.18 6.894 53.742 2 MED
Flathead 427 Riley Benson   269 196.37 0.9 7.52 7.026 53.638 2 MED
Flathead 520 Brooklyne Scott   271 197.83 0.62 6.2 5.654 53.631 2 MED
Flathead 441 Bentley Braaten   245 178.85 0.94 7.2 7.33 53.498 2 MED
Flathead 659 Rachelle Becker   269 196.37 0.99 7.87 7.376 53.47 2 MED
Flathead 790 Will Anderson   264 192.72 0.94 7.46 7.096 53.316 2 MED
Flathead 463 Tristen Cheff Kingsbury Colony 248 181.04 0.67 5.82 5.872 53.22 2 MED
Flathead 730 Sawyer Sorensen   278 202.94 0.89 7.4 6.672 53.179 2 MED
Flathead 388 Silas Ypma   269 196.37 0.96 7.53 7.036 53.085 2 MED
Flathead 782 Korbin Baldwin Elk Creek Colony 259 189.07 0.78 6.48 6.246 53.079 2 MED
Flathead 776 Jaden Schreckendgust Elk Creek Colony 281 205.13 0.75 6.7 5.894 53.034 2 MED
Flathead 639 Lane Anello   281 205.13 0.74 6.62 5.814 52.974 2 MED
Flathead 643 Sawyer Kauffman   246 179.58 0.86 6.51 6.614 52.804 2 MED
Flathead 775 Dylann Billington   270 197.1 0.8 6.62 6.1 52.782 2 MED
Flathead 374 Katie Zink   270 197.1 1.09 8.02 7.5 52.777 2 MED
Flathead 658 Daisy Becker   270 197.1 1.03 7.65 7.13 52.62 2 MED
Flathead 450 Joseph Houston   250 182.5 0.8 6.01 6.01 52.212 2 MED
Flathead 599 Adelyn Kerst   280 204.4 1.03 7.48 6.7 51.979 2 MED
Flathead 518 Connley Bean   281 205.13 0.77 6.13 5.324 51.774 2 MED
Flathead 735 Brander Christianson   271 197.83 1.09 7.47 6.924 51.666 2 MED
Flathead 390 Cruz Diede   265 193.45 1.34 7.9 7.51 50.286 2 MED
Flathead 630 Ladahlia Hook   252 183.96 1.27 6.84 6.788 49.105 2 MED
Flathead 733 Octavius Christianson   241 175.93 1.36 6.65 6.884 47.974 2 MED
Flathead 384 Rhett Billington   280 204.4 1.66 7.82 7.04 46.846 2 MED
Flathead 398 Tracen McIntyre Deaton Show Pigs 256 186.88 1.89 6.71 6.554 42.531 2 MED
Flathead 452 Makenna Woody   231 168.63 0.47 5.95 6.444 56.443 1 LOW
Flathead 385 Braidy Billington   229 167.17 0.83 7.53 8.076 56.182 1 LOW
Flathead 631 Alaina Ochenrider   230 167.9 0.56 5.97 6.49 55.54 1 LOW
Flathead 662 Sabrina Phillips   291 212.43 0.85 8.53 7.464 55.171 1 LOW
Flathead 538 Gabriel Ochenrider   229 167.17 0.85 7 7.546 54.728 1 LOW
Flathead 601 Jayven Poole   236 172.28 0.69 6.12 6.484 54.162 1 LOW
Flathead 523 Emma DeLong   236 172.28 0.71 6.03 6.394 53.742 1 LOW
Flathead 654 Dawson Olsen   227 165.71 0.65 5.45 6.048 53.461 1 LOW
Flathead 575 Kait Giffin   295 215.35 0.65 6.58 5.41 53.246 1 LOW
Flathead 753 Nate Skonord   285 208.05 0.86 7.36 6.45 53.142 1 LOW
Flathead 645 Shianne Benson Kingsbury Colony 269 196.37 0.85 6.99 6.496 53.069 1 LOW
Flathead 423 Ruthie Hornbrook Big Sky Colony 282 205.86 0.91 7.3 6.468 52.674 1 LOW
Flathead 474 Teagan Hayek Kingsbury Colony 276 201.48 0.81 6.7 6.024 52.645 1 LOW
Flathead 361 Taylor Newton   229 167.17 0.86 6.13 6.676 52.598 1 LOW
Flathead 574 Charley Gregg   267 194.91 0.89 6.8 6.358 52.376 1 LOW
Flathead 611 Gabriel Dowler   230 167.9 0.76 5.51 6.03 52.245 1 LOW
Flathead 489 Madison Peters   225 164.25 0.74 5.33 5.98 52.238 1 LOW
Flathead 527 Daniel Houston   222 162.06 0.71 5.12 5.848 52.198 1 LOW
Flathead 376 Andrew Hawken   237 173.01 0.89 6.23 6.568 52.197 1 LOW
Flathead 504 Elizabeth Holmes   274 200.02 0.92 6.95 6.326 52.164 1 LOW
Flathead 618 Brooke-Lynn Hankinson   260 189.8 0.87 6.42 6.16 52.031 1 LOW
Flathead 499 Jolisa Pond   243 177.39 0.82 5.91 6.092 52.028 1 LOW
Flathead 795 Michael Reed   295 215.35 1.07 7.81 6.64 51.804 1 LOW
Flathead 389 Levi Ypma   288 210.24 1.2 8.3 7.312 51.746 1 LOW
Flathead 511 Sage Harapat   274 200.02 0.94 6.77 6.146 51.628 1 LOW
Flathead 502 Zion Poole   266 194.18 0.91 6.38 5.964 51.377 1 LOW
Flathead 788 Sophie Bailey   284 207.32 1.01 7.01 6.126 51.164 1 LOW
Flathead 413 Patience Bain Big Sky Colony 254 185.42 0.82 5.56 5.456 50.935 1 LOW
Flathead 628 Mark Ahner   265 193.45 1.04 6.66 6.27 50.707 1 LOW
Flathead 532 AJ   Opperman   256 186.88 1.03 6.47 6.314 50.66 1 LOW
Flathead 669 Serena Keil   274 200.02 1.03 6.7 6.076 50.649 1 LOW
Flathead 576 Addy Giffin   276 201.48 0.93 6.01 5.334 50.201 1 LOW
Flathead 475 Michaela Anderson Elk Creek Colony 264 192.72 1.07 6.49 6.126 50.1 1 LOW
Flathead 531 Annie Bois   242 176.66 1.07 6.21 6.418 50.068 1 LOW
Flathead 491 Macey McIlhargey   245 178.85 1.03 6 6.13 49.954 1 LOW
Flathead 509 Abner Holmes   287 209.51 1.3 7.79 6.828 49.935 1 LOW
Flathead 506 Autumn Holmes   284 207.32 1.05 6.34 5.456 49.55 1 LOW
Flathead 533 Aiden Sawyer   276 201.48 1.07 6.24 5.564 49.341 1 LOW
Flathead 454 Joseph Barone   245 178.85 1.08 5.87 6 49.148 1 LOW
Flathead 738 Cassius Christianson   270 197.1 1.14 6.21 5.69 48.741 1 LOW
Flathead 401 Espen Erickson   230 167.9 1.25 6.36 6.88 48.736 1 LOW
Flathead 367 Eli   Crockett   279 203.67 1.09 6.02 5.266 48.677 1 LOW
Flathead 494 Joslyn Crofts   257 187.61 1.1 5.82 5.638 48.59 1 LOW
Flathead 393 Maverick Diede   265 193.45 1.21 6.42 6.03 48.579 1 LOW
Flathead 752 Josie Elgin   277 202.21 1.23 6.59 5.888 48.508 1 LOW
Flathead 549 Brooke   Lynch   280 204.4 1.22 6.47 5.69 48.321 1 LOW
Flathead 525 Kaj   Haagerup   275 200.75 1.14 6.02 5.37 48.283 1 LOW
Flathead 532 Celia Fetterhoff   276 201.48 1.11 5.86 5.184 48.238 1 LOW
Flathead 644 Kindi Benson Kingsbury Colony 274 200.02 1.03 5.43 4.806 48.187 1 LOW
Flathead 591 Evelynne Dorr   256 186.88 1.04 5.32 5.164 48.174 1 LOW
Flathead 448 Taylsen Pond   242 176.66 1.19 5.89 6.098 48.092 1 LOW
Flathead 770 Dylan Benson   283 206.59 1.16 6.01 5.152 47.953 1 LOW
Flathead 410 Abby Fritz   238 173.74 1.61 7.74 8.052 47.762 1 LOW
Flathead 608 Grayce Siderius   267 194.91 1.4 6.94 6.498 47.75 1 LOW
Flathead 636 Joselyn Hawbaker   265 193.45 1.32 6.25 5.86 47.172 1 LOW
Flathead 354 Isaac Crockett   274 200.02 1.27 5.94 5.316 46.926 1 LOW
Flathead 648 TY   Anderson Elk Creek Colony 255 186.15 1.25 5.69 5.56 46.847 1 LOW
Flathead 547 Millie Hook   264 192.72 1.28 5.77 5.406 46.609 1 LOW
Flathead 510 Dylan Harapat   260 189.8 1.07 4.66 4.4 46.461 1 LOW
Flathead 784 Raya Gronley   260 189.8 1.45 6.33 6.07 46.119 1 LOW
Flathead 595 Zoey Wirth   267 194.91 1.41 5.93 5.488 45.644 1 LOW
Flathead 530 Torin Ottosen Big Sky Colony 262 191.26 1.39 5.51 5.198 45.026 1 LOW
Flathead 756 Wylee Berglund   250 182.5 1.6 5.92 5.92 43.804 1 LOW
Flathead 593 Cecelia Wirth   283 206.59 1.7 4.4 3.542 40.032 1 LOW
Flathead 417 Ryker Sutton   289 210.97 0.89 6.9 5.886 51.899 0 NO
Flathead 483 Abby Sliter Elk Creek Colony 293 213.89 0.92 6.97 5.852 51.651 0 NO
Flathead 536 Matthew Ahner   289 210.97 1.09 7.49 6.476 51.207 0 NO
Flathead 405 Olivia Martin   291 212.43 0.87 6.33 5.264 50.979 0 NO
Flathead 571 Kati Crockett   233 170.09 0.96 5.59 6.032 50.113 0 NO
Flathead 769 Linea' Benson   292 213.16 1.05 6.54 5.448 49.753 0 NO
Flathead 428 Emily Benson   287 209.51 1.13 6.71 5.748 49.458 0 NO
Flathead 429 Kirsten Benson   292 213.16 1.16 6.47 5.378 48.659 0 NO
Flathead 577 Clara Giffin   286 208.78 1 5.2 4.264 47.841 0 NO
Flathead 594 Elaina Dorr   234 170.82 1.04 4.87 5.286 47.573 0 NO
Flathead 729 Landry Christianson   223 162.79 1.11 5.11 5.812 47.53 0 NO
Flathead 578 Caroline Rennie   292 213.16 1.58 6.57 5.478 45.147 0 NO
Flathead 570 Aaron Ramsey   227 165.71 1.32 5.04 5.638 44.923 0 NO
Flathead 652 Kylie Mercer   222 162.06 0.4 7.02 7.748 60.329 0 DQ